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Electrical and Computer Engineering


Undergraduate Program in Computer Engineering (AECPEBASC)

Undergraduate Office

Professor Ravi Adve, Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies
Leanne Dawkins, Program Manager & Academic Advisor
Lina McDonald, Undergraduate Program & Payroll Officer
Karen Irving, Studetn Advisor
Neena Peterson, Information Services Assistant

Room B600, Sandford Fleming Building
416-946-7179
askece@ecf.utoronto.ca

The Computer Engineering undergraduate program is distinctive as it is based on the broad areas of electrical engineering and computer science. These foundations are used in the design and organization of computer systems, design of programs that turn these systems into useful applications and the use of computers in communication and control systems. Design includes hardware, operating systems and software. Computer engineering students will learn how computer systems work and how they can be integrated into larger systems that serve a wide range of users and businesses. As a result, the program also ensures that our students will gain experience in communications, problem-solving and team management.

A computer engineer may be involved in the design of computers and computer systems. They may also be engaged in the design of computer-based communications and control systems or in the design of microelectronic circuits, including computer-aided design and manufacturing. Computer system analysis and the design of both hardware and software for applications, such as artificial intelligence and expert systems, database systems, wireless networks, computer security and robotics, are included in the scope of the computer engineer’s work.

The first two years of study provide the essential background in basic science and mathematics and introduce students to important concepts in electrical and computer engineering, such as circuits, digital systems, electronics and communication systems. These two years of study are identical to those in electrical engineering.

In third and fourth year, the curriculum allows flexibility in students' course selections, subject to the program and accreditation requirements. An online program called "Magellan" helps students facilitate the course selection process. All second-year students have access to Magellan by the end of their fall term. If students have questions regarding their curriculum, they should contact the Department's undergraduate office. 

Graduates may decide to go directly into the workforce or pursue studies at the graduate level. Detailed information on graduate studies in the Department can be found online at  http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/graduates-home/

Graduate Programs in Computer Engineering

Graduate study and research in computer engineering may be pursued through either the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering or the Department of Computer Science. Both theoretical and applied topics are encouraged. Programs lead to the MEng or MASc degrees in engineering or the MSc in computer science and PhD in either department. Prospective graduate students should consult the appropriate department (ECE or Computer Science) early to determine the most appropriate department to register in.

 

 

Undergraduate Program in Electrical Engineering (AEELEBASC)

Undergraduate Office

Professor Ravi Adve, Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies
Leanne Dawkins, Program Manager and Academic Advisor
Lina McDonald, Undergraduate Program & Payroll Officer
Karen Irving, Student Advisor
Neena Peterson, Information Services Assistant

Room B600, Sandford Fleming Building
416-946-7179
askece@ecf.utoronto.ca

Electrical engineering is an exciting and extensive field that applies the principles of science and mathematics with engineering fundamentals which are then used to develop a student’s skills needed to analyze, design and build electrical, electronic and photonics systems. The program includes diverse areas of study such as microelectronics, digital communications, wireless systems, photonics systems, signal processing, control, microprocessors, computer technology, energy systems and electronic device fabrication. This breadth is unique to electrical engineering and opens a wide range of career opportunities. As a result, the program also ensures that through their course work, students gain experience in communications, problem-solving and team management.

An electrical engineer may be involved in the design, development and testing of electrical and electronic equipment such as telecommunication systems, industrial process controls, signal processing, navigation systems, power generation, transmission systems, wireless and optical communications and integrated circuit engineering.

The first two years of study provide the essential background in basic science and mathematics and also introduce students to the important concepts in electrical and computer engineering, such as circuits, digital systems, electronics and communication systems. These two years of study are identical to those in computer engineering.

In third and fourth year, the curriculum allows flexibility in students' course selections, subject to the program and accreditation requirements. An online program called "Magellan" helps students facilitate the course selection process. All second-year students have access to Magellan by the end of their fall term. If students have questions regarding their curriculum, they should contact the Department's undergraduate office. 

Graduates may decide to go directly into the workforce or pursue studies at the graduate level. Detailed information on graduate studies in the Department can be found online at  http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/graduates-home/

Graduate Programs in Electrical Engineering

Graduate study and research in electrical engineering may be pursued in either the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering or the Department of Computer Science. Both theoretical and applied topics are encouraged. Programs lead to the MEng or MASc degrees in engineering or the MSc in computer science and the PhD in either department. Prospective graduate students should consult the appropriate department (ECE or Computer Science) early to determine the most appropriate department to register in.