Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry


Undergraduate Program and Chemical Engineering (AECHEBASC)

Associate Chair, Undergraduate Student Experience and Associate Professor, Teaching Stream Jennifer Farmer, Ph.D.
Room 201A Wallberg Building
416-978-6561
jennifer.farmer@utoronto.ca  

Professor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate Curriculum Development
William R. Cluett, B.Sc. (Queen’s), Ph.D. (Alberta), P.Eng. (Ontario), F.C.I.C., F.A.A.A.S., F.E.C.
416-978-5889
will.cluett@utoronto.ca

Undergraduate Advisor (Acting)
Tracey Peters
Room 216A, Wallberg Building
416-978-5336
ugrad.chemeng@utoronto.ca

Chemical engineering is the primary engineering discipline that is based on the fundamental sciences of chemistry, physics, biochemistry and mathematics, in which processes are conceived, designed and operated to effect compositional changes in materials of all kinds. Chemical engineers play an important role in the development of a healthier environment and safer and healthier industrial workplaces. They develop new industrial processes that are more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly and create products that improve quality of life. Chemical engineers are responsible for improvements in technologies and in evaluating and controlling hazards. In addition to the basic sciences, chemical engineers use a well-defined body of knowledge in the application of the conservation laws that determine mass flow and energy relations; thermodynamics and kinetics which determine whether or not reactions are feasible and the rate at which they occur; and the chemical engineering rate laws that determine limits to the transfer of heat, mass and momentum.

Students who graduate from the chemical engineering program are skilled problem solvers. A strong background in applied chemistry furnishes the chemical engineer with the knowledge to participate in the broadest range of engineering activities and pursue other professional careers in management, medicine, law, teaching and government. Instruction in important aspects of economic analysis is also included. In the Fall Term of fourth year, students participate in small teams in the design of a chemical plant. Fourth-year students may undertake individual full-year research projects. These projects, the culmination of which is a thesis, serve, in many cases, as an introduction to research, and provides opportunities to apply the principles developed during the first three years of the program to problems of engineering interest. A thesis project may, for example, concern an experimental laboratory investigation, the design of a process, or a computer study of a complex chemical system.

The technical elective subjects available in years three and four cover a wide range of fundamental and application areas of chemical engineering and applied chemistry. By choosing electives from a restricted list, it is possible for students to complete the requirements for an engineering minor. A minor signifies that a student has gained an enhanced understanding of a specific field of study. For more information on the various minors, please see the sections of the Calendar relating to these programs.

Graduate Programs in Chemical Engineering

The Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry provides exciting opportunities for students who would like to pursue advanced studies beyond the undergraduate level toward the MEng, MASc or PhD degrees. The Department offers more than 20 graduate-level courses toward the study requirements of the degree programs. Financial support is provided to graduate students through research grants and/or fellowships, together with some undergraduate teaching in the laboratories. Undergraduate students interested in postgraduate programs are invited to discuss research activities and graduate studies in the Department with any staff member at any stage of their undergraduate programs. Further information may also be obtained from the Coordinator of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Room 212, Wallberg Building, and from the Calendar of the School of Graduate Studies.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (AECHEBASC)

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (AECHEBASC)

First Year Chemical Engineering

Fall Session - Year 1   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
APS100H1: Orientation to Engineering F 1 - 1 0.25
APS110H1: Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science F 3 - 2 0.50
APS111H1: Engineering Strategies & Practice I F 3 1 1 0.50
CIV100H1: Mechanics F 3 - 2 0.50
MAT186H1: Calculus I F 3 - 1 0.50
MAT188H1: Linear Algebra F 3 1 1 0.50
Winter Session - Year 1   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
APS106H1: Fundamentals of Computer Programming S 3 2 1 0.50
APS112H1: Engineering Strategies & Practice II S 2 2 - 0.50
CHE112H1: Physical Chemistry S 3 1 1 0.50
CHE113H1: Concepts in Chemical Engineering S 3 2 2 0.50
CHE191H1: Introduction to Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry S 1 - - 0.15
MAT187H1: Calculus II S 3 - 1 0.50

Approved Course Substitution

  1. Students are able to substitute MAT186H1 with the online calculus course APS162H1.
  2. Students are able to substitute MAT187H1 with the online calculus course APS163H1.
  3. Students are able to substitute APS110H1 with the online course APS164H1.
  4. Students are able to substitute CIV100H1 with the online course APS160H1.

Second Year Chemical Engineering

Fall Session - Year 2   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE204H1: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory I F 2 6 - 0.25
CHE208H1: Process Engineering F 3 - 2 0.50
CHE211H1: Fluid Mechanics F 3 - 2 0.50
CHE220H1: Applied Chemistry I - Inorganic Chemistry F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE221H1: Calculus III F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE223H1: Statistics F 2 - 1 0.50
CHE299H1: Communication F 1 - 1 0.25
Winter Session - Year 2   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE205H1: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory II S 2 6 - 0.25
CHE210H1: Heat and Mass Transfer S 3 - 2 0.50
CHE213H1: Applied Chemistry II - Organic Chemistry S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE222H1: Process Dynamics: Modeling, Analysis and Simulation S 3 2 1 0.50
CHE230H1: Environmental Chemistry S 3 - 2 0.50
CHE249H1: Engineering Economic Analysis S 3 - 1 0.50

Practical Experience Requirement

  • As described in the beginning of this chapter, students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience before graduation (normally during their summer vacation periods).

Third Year Chemical Engineering

Fall Session - Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE304H1: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory III F - 6 - 0.50
CHE323H1: Engineering Thermodynamics F 3 - 2 0.50
CHE324H1: Process Design F 3 - 2 0.50
CHE332H1: Reaction Kinetics F 3 - 2 0.50
CHE399H1: Professional Engineering Consultancy F 1 - 2 0.25
Technical Elective F       0.50
Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences Elective F       0.50
Winter Session - Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE305H1: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory IV S - 6 - 0.50
CHE311H1: Separation Processes S 3 - 2 0.50
CHE322H1: Process Control S 3 - 2 0.50
CHE333H1: Chemical Reaction Engineering S 3 - 2 0.50
CHE334H1: Team Strategies for Engineering Design S 1 - 2 0.50
and one of:          
Technical Elective S       0.50
Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences Elective S       0.50

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR

Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enroll and participate in the Professional Experience Year Co-Op Program (PEY Co-Op). The PEY Co-op program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating industry. Details are described in the beginning of this chapter. More information can be found in the PEY Co-op section of the calendar. 

Fourth Year Chemical Engineering

Fall Session - Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE430Y1: Chemical Plant Design F 2 - 6 1.00
Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences Elective F       0.50
Technical Elective F/S/Y       0.50
and one of:          
CHE499Y1: Thesis Y - 7 - 1.00
Technical Elective F       0.50
Winter Session - Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE403H1: Professional Practice S 2 - - 0.00
Technical Elective S       0.50
Technical Elective S       0.50
Free Elective S       0.50
Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences Elective S       0.50
and one of:          
CHE499Y1: Thesis Y - 7 - 1.00
Technical Elective S       0.50
  1. In years 3 and 4, students must complete a total of 6 Technical Electives (or 4 Technical Electives and CHE499Y1: Thesis). See section below for more information.
  2. In years 3 and 4, students must complete a total of 4 Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences (CS/HSS) Electives, at least 2 of which must be Humanities and Social Sciences. Refer to the Registrar's Office website for a list of pre-approved CS/HSS Electives.
  3. In years 3 and 4, students must complete 1 Free Elective. A Free Elective has few restrictions: any degree credit course listed in the current calendars of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, the Faculty of Arts and Science, and the School of Graduate Studies is acceptable as a Free Elective provided it does not duplicate material covered in courses taken or to be taken.

THESIS

The thesis (CHE499Y1) is a full-year (Fall and Winter Sessions) thesis that requires approval from the department and research project supervisor.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

Students may take any of the Technical Elective courses listed in the table below, or from any of the technical Engineering Minors (excluding the Minor in Engineering Business). Students wishing to pursue an Engineering Minor should take their core courses as technical electives in terms 3F and 3S. For more information on the various Minors, please see the sections of the Calendar relating to these programs.

Technical Electives

Courses Offered in Fall    Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
APS360H1: Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning F/S 3 - 1 0.50
APS502H1: Financial Engineering F/S 3 - - 0.50
BME440H1: Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation F 2 4 - 0.50
BME455H1: Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering II F 3 1.5 1 0.50
BME595H1: Medical Imaging F 2 3 3 0.50
CHE353H1: Engineering Biology F 2 - 2 0.50
CHE441H1: Engineering Materials F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE450H1: Bioprocess Technology and Design F 3 0.66 1 0.50
CHE451H1: Petroleum Processing F 3 - - 0.50
CHE467H1: Environmental Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE470H1: Special Topics in Chemical Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE562H1: Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering F 3 - - 0.50
CHE565H1: Aqueous Process Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE566H1: Elements of Nuclear Engineering F 3 - 2 0.50
CHM416H1: Separation Science F 2 - - 0.50
CHM456H1: Organic Materials Chemistry F 2 - - 0.50
CHM457H1: Polymer Chemistry F 2 - 1 0.50
CIV220H1: Urban Engineering Ecology F 2 2 - 0.50
CIV300H1: Terrestrial Energy Systems F 3 - 2 0.50
CIV375H1: Building Science F 3 0.33 2 0.50
CIV531H1: Transport Planning F 3 - 1 0.50
CIV550H1: Water Resources Engineering F 3 - 2 0.50
CME549H1: Groundwater Flow and Contamination F 3 - 1 0.50
ECE345H1: Algorithms and Data Structures F/S 3 - 2 0.50
ECE421H1: Introduction to Machine Learning F/S 3 - 2 0.50
ECE446H1: Sensory Communication F 3 1.5 1 0.50
IMM250H1: The Immune System and Infection Disease F/S 2 - - 0.50
MGY377H1: Microbiology I: Bacteria F 3 - - 0.50
MIE515H1: Alternative Energy Systems F 3 - 1 0.50
MIE516H1: Combustion and Fuels F 3 - 1 0.50
MSE440H1: Biomaterial Processing and Properties F 3 - 1 0.50
PCL302H1: Pharmacodynamic Principles F 3 - - 0.50
PSL300H1: Human Physiology I F 3 - 1a 0.50
Courses Offered in Winter   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
BME330H1: Patents in Biology and Medical Devices S 3 - - 0.50
BME331H1: Physiological Control Systems S 3 1 1 0.50
BME412H1: Introduction to Biomolecular Engineering S 3 - - 0.50
BME530H1: Human Whole Body Biomechanics S 2 2 - 0.50
CHE354H1: Cellular and Molecular Biology S 3 1 2 0.50
CHE412H1: Advanced Reactor Design S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE460H1: Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment S 3 - 2 0.50
CHE462H1: Food Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE469H1: Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion Devices S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE470H1: Special Topics in Chemical Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE471H1: Modelling in Biological and Chemical Systems S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE475H1: Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE507H1: Data-based Modelling for Prediction and Control S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE561H1: Risk Based Safety Management S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE564H1: Pulp and Paper Processes S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE568H1: Nuclear Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
CHM415H1: Topics in Atmospheric Chemistry S 2 - - 0.50
CIV250H1: Hydraulics and Hydrology S 3 1.5 1 0.50
CIV300H1: Terrestrial Energy Systems S 3 - 2 0.50
CIV440H1: Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment S 3 - 1 0.50
ECE368H1: Probabilistic Reasoning S 3 - 1 0.50
FOR310H1: Bioenergy from Sustainable Forest Management S 2 - 1 0.50
FOR424H1: Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials S 2 - 1 0.50
FOR425H1: Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology S 2 - 2 0.50
HMB201H1: Introduction to Fundamental Genetics and its Applications S 2 - 1 0.50
MIE304H1: Introduction to Quality Control S 3 1 2 0.50
MIE408H1: * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors S 3 - 2 0.50
MIE517H1: Fuel Cell Systems S 3 - 1 0.50
MIE519H1: * Advanced Manufacturing Technologies S 3 - - 0.50
MSE438H1: Computational Materials Design S 2 2 1 0.50
MSE458H1: Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems S 3 - 2 0.50
PCL201H1: Introduction to Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetic Principles S 3 - 1a 0.50

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Courses

Applied Science and Engineering (Interdepartmental)

APS100H1 - Orientation to Engineering

APS100H1 - Orientation to Engineering
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/12.8T

This course is designed to help students transition into first-year engineering studies and to develop and apply a greater understanding of the academic learning environment, the field of engineering, and how the fundamental mathematics and sciences are used in an engineering context. Topics covered include: study skills, time management, problem solving, successful teamwork, effective communications, exam preparation, stress management and wellness, undergraduate research, extra- and co-curricular involvement, engineering disciplines and career opportunities, and applications of math and science in engineering.

Total AUs: 17.7 (Fall), 19.2 (Winter), 36.9 (Full Year)

APS106H1 - Fundamentals of Computer Programming

APS106H1 - Fundamentals of Computer Programming
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

An introduction to computer systems and software. Topics include the representation of information, algorithms, programming languages, operating systems and software engineering. Emphasis is on the design of algorithms and their implementation in software. Students will develop a competency in the Python programming language. Laboratory exercises will explore the concepts of both Structure-based and Object-Oriented programming using examples drawn from mathematics and engineering applications.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

APS110H1 - Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science

APS110H1 - Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course is structured around the principle of the structure-property relationship. This relationship refers to an understanding of the microstructure of a solid, that is, the nature of the bonds between atoms and the spatial arrangement of atoms, which permits the explanation of observed behaviour. Observed materials behaviour includes mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical, and corrosive behaviour. Topics covered in this course include: structure of the atom, models of the atom, electronic configuration, the electromagnetic spectrum, band theory, atomic bonding, optical transparency of solids, magnetic properties, molecular bonding, hybridized orbitals, crystal systems, lattices and structures, crystallographic notation, imperfections in solids, reaction rates, activation energy, solid-state diffusion, materials thermodynamics, free energy, and phase equilibrium.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

APS112H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice II

APS112H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6P

This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process, problem solving and project management. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for practicing team skills and developing communications skills. Building on the first course, this second course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to project management and to the design process in greater depth. Students work in teams on a term length design project. Students will write a series of technical reports and give a team based design project presentation.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

APS360H1 - Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning

APS360H1 - Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

A basic introduction to the history, technology, programming and applications of the fast evolving field of deep learning. Topics to be covered may include neural networks, autoencoders/decoders, recurrent neural networks, natural language processing, and generative adversarial networks. Special attention will be paid to fairness and ethics issues surrounding machine learning. An applied approach will be taken, where students get hands-on exposure to the covered techniques through the use of state-of-the-art machine learning software frameworks.

Prerequisite: APS105H1/APS106H1/ESC180H1/CSC180H1; APS163/MAT187H1/ESC195H1; MAT185H1/MAT188H1
Recommended Preparation: CHE223H1/CME263H1/ECE302H1/MIE231H1/MIE236H1/MSE238H1/STA286H1/ECE286H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

APS502H1 - Financial Engineering

APS502H1 - Financial Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course will focus on capital budgeting, financial optimization, and project evaluation models and their solution techniques. In particular, linear, non-linear, and integer programming models and their solutions techniques will be studied. The course will give engineering students a background in modern capital budgeting and financial techniques that are relevant in practival engineering and commercial settings.

Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT187H1, MAT188H1, MIE236H1, MIE237H1, or equivalent.
Exclusion: MIE375H1
Total AUs: 17.7 (Fall), 19.2 (Winter), 36.9 (Full Year)

Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering

BME330H1 - Patents in Biology and Medical Devices

BME330H1 - Patents in Biology and Medical Devices
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

The emphasis of the course is on applying the logic of patents to diverse cases of products through biology and biomedical engineering. A commercial context will be ever present the case studies. Students will work in teams on these problems in class. Students will learn to apply tests for obviousness, inventiveness, novelty and enablement based on the use of these tests in technology patents in the past. Claim construction will be introduced towards the end of the course to learn how technologies can be protected in considering a patent. There will be papers for reading in this course but no textbook. This course is designed for senior undergraduate students (3-4 year).

Prerequisite: CHE353H1 or BME205H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

BME331H1 - Physiological Control Systems

BME331H1 - Physiological Control Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Introduces physiological concepts and selected physiological control systems present in the human body, and proposes quantitative modeling approaches for these systems. Topics covered will include (1) the endocrine system and its subsystems, including glucose regulation and the stress response, (2) the cardiovascular system and related aspects such as cardiac output, venous return, control of blood flow by the tissues, and nervous regulation of circulation, and (3) the nervous and musculoskeletal systems, including the control of voluntary motion. Linear control theory will be used to develop skills in system modeling and examine concepts of system response and system control in the context of a healthy human body.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

BME412H1 - Introduction to Biomolecular Engineering

BME412H1 - Introduction to Biomolecular Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Introduces the mechanics and dynamics of the operation of life at the molecular level by teaching how to design new proteins, DNA, and RNA. Introduces the fundamentals of biomolecular structure, function, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Covers a broad range of computational and experimental techniques, including atomistic simulations, bioinformatics, machine learning, high-throughput screening, and gene editing.
Enrolment Limits: 30
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

BME440H1 - Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation

BME440H1 - Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/51.2P

Fundamental biomedical research technologies with specific focus on cellular and molecular methodologies. Examples include DNA and protein analysis and isolation, microscopy, cell culture and cellular assays. Combines both theoretical concepts and hand-on practical experience via lectures and wet labs, respectively. Specific applications as applied to biotechnology and medicine will also be outlined and discussed.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

BME455H1 - Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering II

BME455H1 - Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Engineering and biophysical tools are used to integrate and enhance our understanding of animal cell behaviour from the molecular to the tissue level. Quantitative methods are used to mathematically model the biology of cell growth, division and differentiation to tissue formation. Specific topics include receptor-ligand interactions, cell adhesion and migration, signal transduction, cell growth and differentiation. Examples from the literature are used to highlight applications in cellular and tissue engineering.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1 and CHE354H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

BME530H1 - Human Whole Body Biomechanics

BME530H1 - Human Whole Body Biomechanics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6P

An introduction to the principles of human body movement. Specific topics include the dynamics of human motion and the neural motor system, with a focus on the positive/negative adaptability of the motor system. Students will experience basic techniques of capturing and analyzing human motion. Engineering applications and the field of rehabilitation engineering will be emphasized using other experimental materials. This course is designed for senior undergraduate and graduate students.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

BME595H1 - Medical Imaging

BME595H1 - Medical Imaging
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/38.4P

An introductory course to medical imaging and is designed as a final year course for engineers. The main clinical imaging modalities are covered: magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, x-ray and computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and clinical optical imaging. Emphasis is placed on the underlying physical and mathematical concepts behind each modality, and applications are discussed in the context of how different modalities complement one another in the clinical setting. Early year engineering concepts are extensively used, including: basic electromagnetics theory, fields and waves, signals and systems, digital signal processing, differential equations and calculus, and probability and random processes. The laboratories involve image reconstruction and analysis for the various imaging modalities and a live animal imaging session.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

CHE112H1 - Physical Chemistry

CHE112H1 - Physical Chemistry
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

A course in physical chemistry. Topics discussed include systems and their states, stoichiometry, the properties of gases, the laws of chemical thermodynamics (calculations involving internal energy, enthalpy, free energy, and entropy), phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, acids and bases, solutions, colligative properties, electrochemistry, and corrosion.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE113H1 - Concepts in Chemical Engineering

CHE113H1 - Concepts in Chemical Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/25.6P

This course provides first year students with an overview of the chemical industry, the chemical engineering profession, and introduces key concepts for the upcoming years of study. The chemical industry is the interface between natural resources (minerals, oil, gas, agricultural products, etc.) and the consumers of the higher value products derived therefrom. This diverse industry has both high volume-low unit value and low volume-high unit value products, and the manufacture of each type of product has its own challenges. The chemical engineering profession applies the scientific fundamentals through two key concepts: Unit Operations as well as Flux. The fundamental elements of stoichiometry and reaction kinetics are further extended to cover the concepts of yield, conversion and their specific applications to continuous and batch reactor systems. Analysis of electrical circuits is introduced, leading to nodal analysis of circuits. The application of resistance in series and capacitance is extended into chemical engineering problems involved, heat transfer, mass transfer and momentum transfer, as well as reaction engineering. The laboratory will reinforce these key chemical engineering principles.

Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

CHE191H1 - Introduction to Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

CHE191H1 - Introduction to Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Credit Value: 0.15
Hours: 12.8L

This is a seminar series that will introduce students to the community, upper-year experience, and core fields of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry. Seminar presenters will represent the major areas in Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry and will also be drawn from an array of groups, including students, staff, faculty, and alumni. The format will vary and may include application examples, case studies, career opportunities, and research talks. The purpose of the seminar series is to provide first year students with some understanding of the various options within the Department to enable them to make educated choices as they progress through the program. This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis.

Total AUs: 11.8 (Fall), 12.8 (Winter), 24.6 (Full Year)

CHE204H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory I

CHE204H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory I
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/37.6P

This laboratory course surveys aspects of inorganic and analytical chemistry from a practical point of view in a comprehensive laboratory experience. In this course, students learn how to analyze known and unknown samples using qualitative and quantitative analysis. Emphasis is placed on primary standards, instrumental techniques (e.g., spectroscopy), classical volumetric techniques (e.g., titration), statistical treatment of data, and reliability and repeatability (i.e., accuracy and precision). The course includes elements of process and industrial chemistry and practice. Theory, where applicable, is interwoven within the laboratories or given as self-taught modules.

Prerequisite: APS110H1, CHE112H1
Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32.0 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

CHE205H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory II

CHE205H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory II
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/37.6P

This laboratory course surveys aspects of organic chemistry from a practical point of view in a comprehensive laboratory experience. In this course, students explore the syntheses of different chemical reactions (substitution, elimination, condensation

and hydrolysis), analyzing and characterizing the intermediates and major products formed using established processes and laboratory techniques (e.g., IR, RI, GC, TLC). The course includes elements of process and industrial chemistry and practice (including Green Chemistry).

Prerequisite: CHE204H1
Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

CHE208H1 - Process Engineering

CHE208H1 - Process Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

An introduction to mass and energy (heat) balances in open systems. A quantitative treatment of selected processes of fundamental industrial and environmental significance involving phase equilibria, reaction and transport phenomena under both steady state and unsteady state conditions. Examples will be drawn from the chemical and materials processing industries, the energy and resource industries and environmental remediation and waste management.

Prerequisite: CHE112H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE210H1 - Heat and Mass Transfer

CHE210H1 - Heat and Mass Transfer
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Fundamentals of heat and transfer, including conduction, convective heat transfer, natural convection, design of heat exchangers, Fick's law of diffusion, analysis of mass transfer problems using Fick's law and mass balances, and effect of chemical reactions on mass transfer. Particular attention is focused on convective heat and mass transfer coefficients as obtained in laminar flow, or from turbulent heat transfer correlations and analogies.

Prerequisite: CHE211H1, CHE221H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE211H1 - Fluid Mechanics

CHE211H1 - Fluid Mechanics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Fundamentals of fluid mechanics including hydrostatics, manometry, Bernoulli's equation, integral mass, linear momentum and energy balances, engineering energy equation, Moody chart, pipe flow calculations, flow measurement instruments and pumps, dimensional analysis, differential analysis of laminar viscous flow, and brief introductions to particle systems, turbulent 1low, non-Newtonian fluids and flow in porous systems.

Prerequisite: CIV100H1, MAT187H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE213H1 - Applied Chemistry II - Organic Chemistry

CHE213H1 - Applied Chemistry II - Organic Chemistry
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Topics include the structure, bonding and characteristic reactions of organic compounds including additions, eliminations, oxidations, reductions, radical reactions, condensation/hydrolysis and rearrangements. The chemical relationships and reactivities of simple functional groups are discussed with an emphasis placed on reaction mechanisms involving the formation of organic intermediates, chemicals and polymers. An introduction will be given on biologically relevant compounds such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Examples will be discussed which outline the usefulness of these reactions and chemicals within the broader chemical industry.

Prerequisite: APS110H1, CHE112H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE220H1 - Applied Chemistry I - Inorganic Chemistry

CHE220H1 - Applied Chemistry I - Inorganic Chemistry
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The Chemistry and physical properties of inorganic compounds are discussed in terms of atomic structure and molecular orbital treatment of bonding. Topics include acid-base and donor-acceptor chemistry, crystalline solid state, chemistry of main group elements and an introduction to coordination chemistry. Emphasis is placed on second row and transition metal elements.

Prerequisite: CHE112H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE221H1 - Calculus III

CHE221H1 - Calculus III
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 37.8L/12.8T

This course introduces the basic concepts of multivariable calculus (partial derivatives, gradients, multiple integrals and vector analysis, etc.) and methods of solution of ordinary differential equations. The course places a strong emphasis on the application of these concepts to practical design and modeling problems in chemical engineering.

Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT187H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE222H1 - Process Dynamics: Modeling, Analysis and Simulation

CHE222H1 - Process Dynamics: Modeling, Analysis and Simulation
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

Introduces concepts used in developing mathematical models of common chemical engineering processes, concepts of process dynamics and methods for analyzing the process response to different perturbations, and the numerical methods required for solving and analyzing the mathematical models. The course will also introduce applications of modeling to biochemical engineering.

Prerequisite: CHE208H1, CHE221H1, MAT188H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

CHE223H1 - Statistics

CHE223H1 - Statistics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Analysis of data using statistics and design of experiments. Topics include probability, properties of the normal distribution, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, fitting equations to data, analysis of variance and design of experiments. The tutorial involves, in part, the application of commercial software to interpret experimental data, as obtained in Chemical Engineering laboratories.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE230H1 - Environmental Chemistry

CHE230H1 - Environmental Chemistry
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The chemical phenomena occurring in environmental systems are examined based on fundamental principles of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry. The course is divided into sections describing the chemistry of the atmosphere, natural waters and soils. The principles applied in the course include reaction kinetics and mechanisms, complex formation, pH and solubility equilibria and adsorption phenomena. Molecules of biochemical importance and instrumental methods of analysis relevant to environmental systems are also addressed. (formerly EDC230H1S)

Prerequisite: CHE112H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE249H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis

CHE249H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Engineering analysis and design are not ends in themselves, but they are a means for satisfying human wants. Thus, engineering concerns itself with the materials used and forces and laws of nature, and the needs of people. Because of scarcity of resources and constraints at all levels, engineering must be closely associated with economics. It is essential that engineering proposals be evaluated in terms of worth and cost before they are undertaken. In this course we emphasize that an essential prerequisite of a successful engineering application is economic feasibility. Hence, investment proposals are evaluated in terms of economic cost concepts, including break even analysis, cost estimation and time value of money. Effective interest rates, inflation and deflation, depreciation and income tax all affect the viability of an investment. Successful engineering projects are chosen from valid alternatives considering such issues as buy or lease, make or buy, cost and benefits and financing alternatives. Both public sector and for-profit examples are used to illustrate the applicability of these rules and approaches.

Prerequisite: CHE221H1, CHE223H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE299H1 - Communication

CHE299H1 - Communication
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/25.6T

Each student will learn to identify the central message they wish to communicate. They will learn to articulate this message through effective argumentation. Students will analyze their audience and purpose to select the most effective mode of communication. Students will summarize and synthesize information from external sources and effectively organize information and prioritize it in each mode of communication. They will apply effective strategies to the design of text, visuals and oral presentations.

Total AUs: 11.8 (Fall), 12.8 (Winter), 24.6 (Full Year)

CHE304H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory III

CHE304H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory III
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8L/37.6P

This laboratory course involves experiments investigating thermodynamics and kinetics, complimenting two courses this term. Thermodynamic experiments include phase equilibrium and calorimetry, and kinetics experiment include investigations of rate constants and Arrhenius behvaiour. Experimental applications of physical and chemical principles using pilot scale equipment. Experiments illustrating major unit operations: distillation; absorption; reactors; extraction; humidification; heat exchange.

Prerequisite: CHE205H1, CHE208H1, CHE210H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE305H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory IV

CHE305H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory IV
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8L/37.6P

This laboratory course involves experiments investigating thermodynamics and kinetics, complimenting two courses this term. Thermodynamic experiments include phase equilibrium and calorimetry, and kinetics experiment include investigations of rate constants and Arrhenius behvaiour. Experimental applications of physical and chemical principles using pilot scale equipment. Experiments illustrating major unit operations: distillation; absorption; reactors; extraction; humidification; heat exchange.

Prerequisite: CHE304H1, CHE323H1, CHE324H1, CHE332H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE311H1 - Separation Processes

CHE311H1 - Separation Processes
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Staged equilibrium and rate governed separation processes for gases and liquids. Topics include equilibrium stage calculations, cascade separation, binary distillation, gas absorption and stripping, liquid-liquid extraction, membrane processes, adsorption and ion exchange. Experiments in fluid mechanics, heat transfer and related unit operations.

Prerequisite: CHE208H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE322H1 - Process Control

CHE322H1 - Process Control
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The major goal of this course is to teach students how to design control strategies for chemical processes. The first part of the course focuses on the types of interconnections encountered in chemical engineering, namely feedback, parallel and series connections, and their effect on the process dynamics. The second part of the course looks at the design of feedback, feedforward, cascade and multivariable control strategies for these processes and interprets these types of engineered interconnections in terms of the effect they have on the performance of the overall system. This course makes extensive use of active learning through computer simulation based on MATLAB/Simulink and Aspen Plus Dynamics software.

Prerequisite: APS106H1, CHE222H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE323H1 - Engineering Thermodynamics

CHE323H1 - Engineering Thermodynamics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Classical thermodynamics and its applications to engineering processes are introduced. Topics include: the concepts of energy, work and entropy; the first and second laws of thermodynamics; properties of pure substances and mixtures; the concepts of thermal equilibrium, phase equilibrium and chemical equilibrium; and heat engines and refrigeration cycles.

Prerequisite: CHE112H1, CHE221H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE324H1 - Process Design

CHE324H1 - Process Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course presents the philosophy and typical procedures of chemical engineering design projects. The course begins at the design concept phase. Material and energy balances are reviewed along with the design of single unit operations and equipment specification sheets. The impact of recycles on equipment sizing is covered. Safety, health and environmental regulations are presented. These lead to the development of safe operating procedures. The systems for developing Piping and Instrumentation diagrams are presented. Process safety studies such as HAZOPS are introduced. Typical utility systems such as steam, air and vacuum are discussed. Project economics calculations are reviewed.

Prerequisite: CHE208H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE332H1 - Reaction Kinetics

CHE332H1 - Reaction Kinetics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The rates of chemical processes. Topics include: measurement of reaction rates, reaction orders and activation energies; theories of reaction rates; reaction mechanisms and networks; development of the rate law for simple and complex kinetic schemes; approach to equilibrium; homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. Performance of simple chemical reactor types.

Prerequisite: CHE210H1, CHE222H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE333H1 - Chemical Reaction Engineering

CHE333H1 - Chemical Reaction Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Covers the basics of simple reactor design and performance, with emphasis on unifying the concepts in kinetics, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. Topics include flow and residence time distributions in various reactor types as well as the influence of transport properties (bulk and interphase) on kinetics and reactor performance. The interplay of these facets of reaction engineering is illustrated by use of appropriate computer simulations.

Prerequisite: CHE323H1, CHE324H1, CHE332H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE334H1 - Team Strategies for Engineering Design

CHE334H1 - Team Strategies for Engineering Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8L/25.6T

In this course, team strategies including how teams work, how to lead and manage teams, and decision making methodologies for successful teams will be taught in the context of engineering design. The development of problem solving and design steps will be undertaken. This course will be taught with an emphasis on team development and problem solving as it relates to the practice of process safety management in engineering and engineering design. The teams will develop a PFD and P&ID's, as well as an operating procedure for a portion of the process. Thus, environmental and occupational health and safety becomes the vehicle through which the teamwork is performed.

Prerequisite: CHE249H1, CHE324H1, CHE332H1
Total AUs: 23.6 (Fall), 25.6 (Winter), 49.2 (Full Year)

CHE353H1 - Engineering Biology

CHE353H1 - Engineering Biology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

Using a quantitative, problem solving approach, this course will introduce basic concepts in cell biology and physiology. Various engineering modelling tools will be used to investigate aspects of cell growth and metabolism, transport across cell membranes, protein structure, homeostasis, nerve conduction and mechanical forces in biology.

Exclusion: BME205H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE354H1 - Cellular and Molecular Biology

CHE354H1 - Cellular and Molecular Biology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

This course will cover the principles of molecular and cellular biology as they apply to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics will include: metabolic conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; nucleic acids; enzymology; structure and function relationships within cells; and motility and growth. Genetic analysis, immunohistochemistry, hybridomis, cloning, recombinant DNA and biotechnology will also be covered. This course will appeal to students interested in environmental microbiology, biomaterials and tissue engineering, and bioprocesses.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

CHE399H1 - Professional Engineering Consultancy

CHE399H1 - Professional Engineering Consultancy
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8L/25.6T

Students are provided with an open-ended and iterative learning experience through a consulting engineering project. Students tackle an authentic design challenge with limited background knowledge, while being guided by instructors who simulate the client-consultant relationship. The project brings together technical and professonal competencies from across eight graduate attributes to enable holistic learning: problem analysis; investigation; design; individual and team work; communication skills; professionalism; economics and project management; lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: CHE299H1
Total AUs: 23.6 (Fall), 25.6 (Winter), 49.2 (Full Year)

CHE403H1 - Professional Practice

CHE403H1 - Professional Practice
Credit Value: 0.00
Hours: 25.6L

In this course, lectures and seminars will be given by practicing engineers who will cover the legal and ethical responsibility an engineer owes to an employer, a client and the public with particular emphasis on environmental issues.

Total AUs: 23.6 (Fall), 25.6 (Winter), 49.2 (Full Year)

CHE408H1 - Data Analytics for Prediction, Control, and Optimization of Chemical Processes

CHE408H1 - Data Analytics for Prediction, Control, and Optimization of Chemical Processes
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8P

This course provides an industry-oriented approach of data analytics for chemical process engineers, including data acquisition methods and data sources, exploratory data analysis and sensitivity analysis, data-based modelling for prediction, data-based modelling for monitoring and control, and data-based optimization.

Prerequisite: APS106H1, CHE223H1, CHE322H1, CHE324H1
Recommended Preparation: CHE507H1
Enrolment Limits: 200
Total AUs: 0 (Fall), 0 (Winter), 0 (Full Year)

CHE412H1 - Advanced Reactor Design

CHE412H1 - Advanced Reactor Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Heterogeneous reactors. Mass and heat transport effects including intraparticle transport effects (Thiele modulus). Stability for various rate laws, transport regimes. Time dependent issues - deactivation/regeneration strategies. Emerging processes.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE416H1 - Chemical Engineering in Human Health

CHE416H1 - Chemical Engineering in Human Health
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Life expectancy has consistently increased over the past 70 years due to advances in healthcare and sanitation. Engineers have played key roles in developing technologies and processes that enabled these critical advances in healthcare to occur. This course will provide an overview of areas in which chemical engineers directly impacted human health. We will study established processes that had transformative effects in the past as well as new emerging areas that chemical engineers are developing today to impact human health. Emphasis will be placed on quantitative approaches. Engineering tools, especially derived from transport phenomena and chemical kinetics will be used. Required readings, including scientific papers, will be assigned. Industrial visit and/or a hands-on project will be included.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1, CHE354H1/MIE331H1; BME205H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE430Y1 - Chemical Plant Design

CHE430Y1 - Chemical Plant Design
Credit Value: 1.00
Hours: 25.6L/76.8T

Students work in teams to design plants for the chemical and process industries and examine their economic viability. Lectures concern the details of process equipment and design.

Prerequisite: CHE249H1, CHE324H1, and two of CHE311H1, CHE322H1, CHE333H1 or equivalent)
Exclusion: APS490Y1
Total AUs: 93.7 (Fall), 101.6 (Winter), 195.3 (Full Year)

CHE441H1 - Engineering Materials

CHE441H1 - Engineering Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course advances the understanding of the use of materials in engineering design, with special emphasis on corrosion and the effect of chemical environment on long term failure modes. Students will learn how to apply material property data to specify materials for load bearing applications, thermal and other non-structural applications, and chemical containment and transport. Topics will include strength of materials concepts, an introduction to computerized materials databases, material failure modes and criteria, principles of corrosion, and practical applications of corrosion prediction and mitigation. Students are required to design a component of their choice and do a detailed materials selection as a major design project.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE450H1 - Bioprocess Technology and Design

CHE450H1 - Bioprocess Technology and Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/8.448P

Building upon CHE353 and CHE354, the aim of this course is to learn and apply engineering principles relevant to bioprocess engineering, including energetics and stoichiometry of cell growth, cell and enzyme kinetics, metabolic modeling, bioreactor design, and bioseparation processes. In addition to course lectures, students will complete two laboratory exercises that will provide hands-on learning in bioreactor set-up and use.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1 and CHE354H1
Total AUs: 45.2 (Fall), 49 (Winter), 94.2 (Full Year)

CHE451H1 - Petroleum Processing

CHE451H1 - Petroleum Processing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course is aimed at surveying the oil industry practices from the perspective of a block flow diagram. Oil refineries today involve the large scale processing of fluids through primary separation techniques, secondary treating plus the introduction of catalyst for molecular reforming in order to meet the product demands of industry and the public. Crude oil is being shipped in increasing quantities from many parts of the world and refiners must be aware of the properties and specifications of both the crude and product slates to ensure that the crude is a viable source and that the product slate meets quality and quantity demands thus assuring a profitable operation. The course content will examine refinery oil and gas operations from feed, through to products, touching on processing steps necessary to meet consumer demands. In both course readings and written assignments, students will be asked to consider refinery operations from a broad perspective and not through detailed analysis and problem solving.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE460H1 - Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment

CHE460H1 - Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Review of the nature, properties and elementary toxicology of metallic and organic contaminants. Partitioning between environmental media (air, aerosols, water, particulate matter, soils, sediments and biota) including bioaccumulation. Degradation processes, multimedia transport and mass balance models. Regulatory approaches for assessing possible effects on human health and ecosystems.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE462H1 - Food Engineering

CHE462H1 - Food Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The quantitative application of chemical engineering principles to the large-scale production of food. Food processing at the molecular and unit operation levels. The chemistry and kinetics of specific food processes. The application of chemical engineering unit operations (distillation, extraction, drying) and food specific unit operations such as extrusion, thermal processing refrigeration/freezing.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE467H1 - Environmental Engineering

CHE467H1 - Environmental Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor A course which treats environmental engineering from a broad based but quantitative perspective and covers the driving forces for engineering activities as well as engineering principles. Models which are used for environmental impact, risk analysis, health impact, pollutant dispersion, and energy system analysis are covered.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE469H1 - Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion Devices

CHE469H1 - Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion Devices
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The objective of this course is to provide a foundation for understanding the field of electrochemical conversion devices with particular emphasis on fuel cells. The topics will proceed from the fundamental thermodynamic in-system electodics and ionic interaction limitations to mass transfer and heat balance effects,t o the externalities such as economics and system integration challenges. Guest lecturers from the fuel cell industry will be invited to procide an industrial perspective. Participants will complete a paper and in-class presentation.

Exclusion: MIE517H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE470H1 - Special Topics in Chemical Engineering

CHE470H1 - Special Topics in Chemical Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

A course covering selected topics in Chemical Engineering, not covered in other electives. Different topics may be covered each year depending on the interest of the Staff and students. May not be offered every year. Limited enrolment: permission of the Department required.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE471H1 - Modelling in Biological and Chemical Systems

CHE471H1 - Modelling in Biological and Chemical Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course outlines the methodology for the modelling of biological systems and its applications. Topics will include a review of physical laws, selection of balance space, compartmental versus distributed models, and applications of the conservation laws for both discrete and continuous systems at the level of algebraic and ordinary differential equations. The course covers a wide range of applications including environmental issues, chemical and biochemical processes and biomedical systems.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE475H1 - Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration

CHE475H1 - Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

An overview on structure, processing and application of natural and biological materials, biomaterials for biomedical applications, and fibre-reinforced eco-composites based on renewable resources will be provided. Fundamental principles related to linear elasticity, linear viscoelasticity, dynamic mechanical response, composite reinforcement mechanics, and time-temperature correspondence will be introduced. Novel concepts in comparative biomechanics, biomimetic and bio-inspired material design, and materials' ecological and environmental impact will be discussed. In addition, key material processing methods and testing and characterization techniques will be presented. Structure-property relationships for materials broadly ranging from natural materials, including wood, bone, cell, and soft tissue, to synthetic composite materials for industrial and biomedical applications will be covered.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

CHE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1, MIE488H1, MSE488H1 and CIV488H1.)

*Complementary Studies Elective

Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE499Y1 - Thesis

CHE499Y1 - Thesis
Credit Value: 1.00
Hours: 89.6P

The course consists of a research project conducted under the supervision of a senior staff member. The project may have an experimental, theoretical or design emphasis. Each thesis will contain a minimum 60% combined Engineering Science and Engineering Design (with a minimum of 10% in each component). This course is open to students with permission of the Department and research project supervisor.

Total AUs: 93.7 (Fall), 101.6 (Winter), 195.2 (Full Year)

CHE504H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry – Laboratory V

CHE504H1 - Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry – Laboratory V
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 76.8P

This laboratory course involves experimental investigation in the application of physical chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, chemical pilot scale-up, chemical separation, chemical purification, data acquisition, etc. in chemical production.

The course involves the operation of pilot-scale equipment to investigate common chemical process problems. Experimental investigation Students need to apply and integrate core engineering concepts/principles including fluid statics/dynamics and mechanical systems, thermodynamics and phase equilibria, thermochemistry and kinetics, and separation techniques to solve common unit operation/chemical process issues. In addition, common process design software including Aspen Plus, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Distributed Control Systems such as Delta-V, and Computer Aided Design are used for problem solving and scale-up design process. Students will work as teams to complete projects involving the use of bench and pilot scale equipment, and simulation programs. Course projects will continue developing student’s experimental and design skills; communication skills; critical thinking, problem-solving, and analysis skills.

Prerequisite: If an Undergraduate Student of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry: CHE204, CHE205, CHE304, CHE305 If a Graduate Student of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry: no prerequisite
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE507H1 - Data-based Modelling for Prediction and Control

CHE507H1 - Data-based Modelling for Prediction and Control
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course will teach students how to build mathematical models of dynamic systems and how to use these models for prediction and control purposes. The course will deal primarily with a system identification approach to modelling (using observations from the system to build a model). Both continuous time and discrete time representations will be treated along with deterministic and stochastic models. This course will make extensive use of interactive learning by having students use computer based tools available in the Matlab software package (e.g. the System Identification Toolbox and the Model Predictive Control Toolbox).

Prerequisite: CHE322H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE561H1 - Risk Based Safety Management

CHE561H1 - Risk Based Safety Management
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course provides an introduction to Process Safety Management. The historical drivers to improve safety performance are reviewed and the difference between safety management and occupational health and safety is discussed. National and international standards for PSM are reviewed. Risk analysis is introduced along with techniques for process hazard analysis and quantification. Consequence and frequency modelling is introduced. Rsik based decision making is introduced, and the course concludes with a discussio of the key management systems required for a successful PSM system.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE562H1 - Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering

CHE562H1 - Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course serves as an introduction to concepts in polymer chemistry, polymer science and polymer engineering. This includes a discussion of the mechanisms of step growth, chain growth and ring-opening polymerizations with a focus on industrially relevant polymers and processes. The description of polymers in solution as well as the solid state will be explored. Several modern polymer characterization techniques are introduced including gel permeation chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis and others.

Exclusion: CHM426H1
Recommended Preparation: CHE213H1, CHE220H1 or equivalents
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE564H1 - Pulp and Paper Processes

CHE564H1 - Pulp and Paper Processes
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The processes of pulping, bleaching and papermaking are used to illustrate and integrate chemical engineering principles. Chemical reactions, phase changes and heat, mass and momentum transfer are discussed. Processes are examined on four scales: molecular, diffusional, unit operations and mill. In the tutorial each student makes several brief presentations on selected topics and entertains discussion.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE565H1 - Aqueous Process Engineering

CHE565H1 - Aqueous Process Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Application of aqueous chemical processing to mineral, environmental and industrial engineering. The course involves an introduction to the theory of electrolyte solutions, mineral-water interfaces, dissolution and crystallization processes, metal ion separations, and electrochemical processes in aqueous reactive systems. Applications and practice of (1) metal recovery from primary (i.e. ores) and secondary (i.e. recycled) sources by hydrometallurgical means, (2) treatment of aqueous waste streams for environmental protection, and (3) production of high-value-added inorganic materials.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE566H1 - Elements of Nuclear Engineering

CHE566H1 - Elements of Nuclear Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A first course in nuclear engineering intended to introduce students to all aspects of this interdisciplinary field. Topics covered include nuclear technology, atomic and nuclear physics, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission, nuclear reactor theory, nuclear power plants, radiation protection and shielding, environment and nuclear safety, and the nuclear fuel cycle.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE568H1 - Nuclear Engineering

CHE568H1 - Nuclear Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Fundamental and applied aspects of nuclear engineering. The structure of the nucleus; nuclear stability and radioactive decay; the interaction of radiation with matter including radiological health hazards; the interaction of neutrons including cross-sections, flux, moderation, fission, neutron diffusion and criticality. Poison buildup and their effects on criticality. Nuclear engineering of reactors, reactor accidents, and safety issues.

Exclusion: MIE414H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Civil Engineering

CIV220H1 - Urban Engineering Ecology

CIV220H1 - Urban Engineering Ecology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor Basic concepts of ecology within the context of urban environments. Response of organisms, populations, dynamic predator-prey and competition processes, and ecosystems to human activities. Thermodynamic basis for food chains, energy flow, biodiversity and ecosystem stability. Biogeochemical cycles, habitat fragmentation and bioaccumulation. Introduction to industrial ecology and life cycle assessment principles. Urban metabolism and material flow analysis of cities. Response of receiving waters to pollution and introduction to waste water treatment. Emphasis is on identifying the environment/engineering interface and minimizing environmental impacts.

Prerequisite: CHE112H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV250H1 - Hydraulics and Hydrology

CIV250H1 - Hydraulics and Hydrology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

The hydrologic processes of precipitation and snowmelt, evapotranspiration, ground water movement, and surface and subsurface runoff are examined. Water resources sustainability issues are discussed, including water usage and water shortages, climate change impacts, land use impacts, and source water protection. Conceptual models of the hydrologic cycle and basics of hydrologic modelling are developed, including precipitation estimation, infiltration and abstraction models, runoff hydrographs, the unit hydrograph method and the Rational method. Methods for statistical analysis of hydrologic data, concepts of risk and design, and hydrological consequences of climate change for design are introduced. Principles of open channel hydraulics are introduced. Energy and momentum principles are studied with application to channel transitions, critical flow, choked flow, and hydraulic jumps.

Prerequisite: CME270H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

CIV300H1 - Terrestrial Energy Systems

CIV300H1 - Terrestrial Energy Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Core Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.

Exclusion: ENV346H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV375H1 - Building Science

CIV375H1 - Building Science
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/4.224000168P

The fundamentals of the science of heat transfer, moisture diffusion, and air movement are presented. Using these fundamentals, the principles of more sustainable building enclosure design, including the design of walls and roofs are examined. Selected case studies together with laboratory investigations are used to illustrate how the required indoor temperature and moisture conditions can be maintained using more durable and more sustainable designs.

Exclusion: CIV575H1
Total AUs: 49.1 (Fall), 53.3 (Winter), 102.5 (Full Year)

CIV440H1 - Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment

CIV440H1 - Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor. The process and techniques for assessing and managing the impacts on and risks to humans and the ecosystem associated with engineered facilities, processes and products. Both biophysical and social impacts are addressed. Topics include: environmental assessment processes; environmental legislation; techniques for assessing impacts; engineering risk analysis; health risk assessment; risk management and communication; social impact assessment; cumulative impacts; environmental management systems; the process of considering alternative methods for preventing and controlling impacts; and stakeholder involvement and public participation. Examples are drawn from various engineering activities and facilities such as energy production, chemical production, treatment plants, highways and landfills.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV531H1 - Transport Planning

CIV531H1 - Transport Planning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course is intended to provide the student with the following: the ability to design and execute an urban transportation planning study; a working knowledge of transportation planning analysis skills including introductions to travel demand modelling, analysis of environmental impacts, modelling transportation - land use interactions and transportation project evaluation; an understanding of current transportation planning issues and policies; and an understanding of the overall process of transportation planning and its role within the wider context of transportation decision-making and the planning and design of urban areas. Person-based travel in urban regions is the focus of this course, but a brief introduction to freight and intercity passenger transportation is also provided. A "systems" approach to transportation planning and analysis is introduced and maintained throughout the course. Emphasis is placed throughout on designing transportation systems for long-run environmental, social, and economic sustainability.

Prerequisite: CME368H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV550H1 - Water Resources Engineering

CIV550H1 - Water Resources Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Global and national water problems, law and legislation. Hydraulic structures. Reservoir analysis. Urban drainage and runoff control: meteorologic data analysis, deterministic and stochastic modelling techniques. Flood control: structural and nonstructural alternatives. Power generation: hydro and thermal power generation. Low flow augmentation. Economics and decision making.

Prerequisite: CIV250H1, CIV340H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Electrical and Computer Engineering

ECE345H1 - Algorithms and Data Structures

ECE345H1 - Algorithms and Data Structures
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Design and analysis of algorithms and data structures that are essential to engineers in every aspect of the computer hardware and software industry. Recurrences, asymptotics, summations, trees and graphs. Sorting, search trees and balanced search trees, amortized analysis, hash functions, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, basic graph algorithms, minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, introduction to NP completeness and new trends in algorithms and data structures.

Prerequisite: ECE244H1 or equivalent with the permission of the Chair of the AI certificate/minor.
Total AUs: 46.5 (Fall), 50.4 (Winter), 96.9 (Full Year)

ECE368H1 - Probabilistic Reasoning

ECE368H1 - Probabilistic Reasoning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course will focus on different classes of probabilistic models and how, based on those models, one deduces actionable information from data. The course will start by reviewing basic concepts of probability including random variables and first and second-order statistics. Building from this foundation the course will then cover probabilistic models including vectors (e.g., multivariate Gaussian), temporal (e.g., stationarity and hidden Markov models), and graphical (e.g., factor graphs). On the inference side topics such as hypothesis testing, marginalization, estimation, and message passing will be covered. Applications of these tools cover a vast range of data processing domains including machine learning, communications, search, recommendation systems, finance, robotics and navigation.

Prerequisite: ECE286H1/ECE302H1
Exclusion: CSC412H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

ECE421H1 - Introduction to Machine Learning

ECE421H1 - Introduction to Machine Learning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

An Introduction to the basic theory, the fundamental algorithms, and the computational toolboxes of machine learning. The focus is on a balanced treatment of the practical and theoretical approaches, along with hands on experience with relevant software packages. Supervised learning methods covered in the course will include: the study of linear models for classification and regression, neural networks and support vector machines. Unsupervised learning methods covered in the course will include: principal component analysis, k-means clustering, and Gaussian mixture models. Theoretical topics will include: bounds on the generalization error, bias-variance tradeoffs and the Vapnik-Chervonenkis (VC) dimension. Techniques to control overfitting, including regularization and validation, will be covered.

Prerequisite: ECE286H1/STA286H1, ECE302H1/MIE231H1/CHE223H1/MIE236H1/MSE238H1
Exclusion: CSC411H1, ECE521H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ECE446H1 - Sensory Communication

ECE446H1 - Sensory Communication
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Physical acoustics, acoustic measurements, electroacoustic transducers, and physiological acoustics. Speech processing, speech recognition algorithms and signal processing by the auditory system. Engineering aspects of acoustic design. Electrical models of acoustic systems. Noise, noise-induced hearing loss, and noise control. Introduction to vision and other modalities. Musical and psychoacoustics.

Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

Forestry

FOR424H1 - Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials

FOR424H1 - Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

Sustainable materials are a mandate for sustainable societies. This course will explore the manufacturing, engineering principles and design fundamentals for creating sustainable materials from renewable resources. Special emphasis will be on bioplastics, biofibre, nanobiofibre, biocomposites and nanobiocomposites. Written communication and design skills will be developed through tutorials and assignments.

Exclusion: FOR423H1
Recommended Preparation: Basic knowledge of materials science.
Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

FOR425H1 - Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology

FOR425H1 - Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

Technological advances and approaches in deriving biofuels, chemical feedstocks from forest and other biomass resources. Fundamental chemical attributes of biomass, as they affect the fuel value and potential for deriving liquid, solid and gaseous fuels and valuable chemicals for other applications will be explored.

Exclusion: FOR410H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

Mathematics

MAT186H1 - Calculus I

MAT186H1 - Calculus I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Topics include: limits and continuity; differentiation; applications of the derivative - related rates problems, curve sketching, optimization problems, L'Hopital's rule; definite and indefinite integrals; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications of integration in geometry, mechanics and other engineering problems.

Exclusion: APS162H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MAT187H1 - Calculus II

MAT187H1 - Calculus II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Topics include: techniques of integration, an introduction to mathematical modeling with differential equations, infinite sequences and series, Taylor series, parametric and polar curves, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, and application to mechanics and other engineering problems.

Prerequisite: APS162H1/MAT186H1
Exclusion: APS163H1/MAT197H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MAT188H1 - Linear Algebra

MAT188H1 - Linear Algebra
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course covers systems of linear equations and Gaussian elimination, applications; vectors in Rn, independent sets and spanning sets; linear transformations, matrices, inverses; subspaces in Rn, basis and dimension; determinants; eigenvalues and diagonalization; systems of differential equations; dot products and orthogonal sets in Rn; projections and the Gram-Schmidt process; diagonalizing symmetric matrices; least squares approximation. Includes an introduction to numeric computation in a weekly laboratory.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

MIE304H1 - Introduction to Quality Control

MIE304H1 - Introduction to Quality Control
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

Introduction to quality engineering. Quality standards and certification. TQM. Modeling processes with simulation. Making inferences about product quality from real or simulation output data. Introduction to statistical process control. Control charts for variables and attributes. Process capability analysis. Lot Acceptance Sampling.

Prerequisite: MIE231 or equivalent
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE408H1 - * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors

MIE408H1 - * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course covers the basic principles of the thermo-mechanical design and analysis of nuclear power reactors. Topics include reactor heat generation and removal, nuclear materials, diffusion of heat in fuel elements, thermal and mechanical stresses in fuel and reactor components, single-phase and two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transport in nuclear reactors, and core thermo-mechanical design.

Prerequisite: MIE407H1/MIE222H1, MIE312H1, MIE313H1 or equivalents
Recommended Preparation: CHE566H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE515H1 - Alternative Energy Systems

MIE515H1 - Alternative Energy Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course covers the basic principles, current technologies and applications of selected alternative energy systems. Specific topics include solar thermal systems, solar photovoltaic systems, wind, wave, and tidal energy, energy storage, and grid connections issues. Limited enrolment.

Prerequisite: MIE210H1,MIE312H1 and MIE313H1 (or equivalent courses).
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE516H1 - Combustion and Fuels

MIE516H1 - Combustion and Fuels
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Introduction to combustion theory. Chemical equilibrium and the products of combustion. Combustion kinetics and types of combustion. Pollutant formation. Design of combustion systems for gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The use of alternative fuels (hydrogen, biofuels, etc.) and their effect on combustion systems.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE517H1 - Fuel Cell Systems

MIE517H1 - Fuel Cell Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Thermodynamics and electrochemistry of fuel cell operation and testing; understanding of polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy; common fuel cell types, materials, components, and auxiliary systems; high and low temperature fuel cells and their applications in transportation and stationary power generation, including co-generation and combined heat and power systems; engineering system requirements resulting from basic fuel cell properties and characteristics.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE519H1 - * Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

MIE519H1 - * Advanced Manufacturing Technologies
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course is designed to provide an integrated multidisciplinary approach to Advanced Manufacturing Engineering, and provide a strong foundation including fundamentals and applications of advanced manufacturing (AM). Topics include: additive manufacturing, 3D printing, micro- and nano-manufacturing, continuous & precision manufacturing, green and biological manufacturing. New applications of AM in sectors such as automotive, aerospace, biomedical, and electronics.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

Materials Science and Engineering

MSE438H1 - Computational Materials Design

MSE438H1 - Computational Materials Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/25.6P

Introduces computational design of materials at atomic scale by focusing on two of the most powerful techniques - density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD). At the heart of both these techniques lies atomistic understanding originating from quantum mechanics; thus the initial lectures will review basics of quantum mechanics to inspire the foundational principles of modern-day DFT approaches. Thereafter theoretical background of DFT and its implementation and application for materials design will be covered. Specific topics on DFT will include Kohn-Sham equations, plane-wave basis sets, exchange and correlation, and nudged-elastic band calculations. Topics concerning MD will include foundational principles, Born-Oppenheimer hypothesis, time integration schemes such as velocity-verlet scheme, and interatomic potential functions. Finally, students will be exposed to the concepts and case-studies pertaining to multi-scale modeling. A particular emphasis of the course is providing hands-on training on open source software packages such as VESTA, Quantum-ESPRESSO, and LAMMPS.

Prerequisite: MSE335H1/PHY356H1/PHY452H1/ECE330H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE440H1 - Biomaterial Processing and Properties

MSE440H1 - Biomaterial Processing and Properties
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/13T

Currently used biomaterials for formation of surgical implants and dental restorations include selected metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites. The selection and processing of these materials to satisfy biocompatibility and functional requirements for applications in selected areas will be presented. Materials used for forming scaffolds for tissue engineering, and strategies for repair, regeneration and augmentation of degenerated or traumatized tissues will be reviewed with a focus on biocompatibility issues and required functionality for the intended applications.

Prerequisite: MSE343H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE458H1 - Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems

MSE458H1 - Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The unique surface properties and the ability to surface engineer nanocrystalline structures renders these materials to be ideal candidates for use in corrosion, catalysis and energy conversion devices. This course deals with the fabrication of materials suitable for use as protective coatings, and their specific exploitation in fields of hydrogen technologies (electrolysis, storage, and fuel cells) linked to renewables. These new devices are poised to have major impacts on power generation utilities, the automotive sector, and society at large. The differences in observed electrochemical behavior between amorphous, nanocrystalline and polycrystalline solid materials will be discussed in terms of their surface structure and surface chemistry. A major team design project along with demonstrative laboratory exercises constitutes a major portion of this course. Limited Enrolment.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

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