Materials Science and Engineering


Undergraduate Program in Materials Engineering (AEMMSBASC)

Academic Advisor
Agnes Hsin
Room 140, Wallberg Building
416-978-7308
mse.undergraduate@utoronto.ca

The goal of the materials engineering undergraduate curriculum is to provide an understanding of the underlying principles of synthesis, characterization and processing of materials and the interrelationships among structure, properties and processing. The program prepares students for professional careers in a wide variety of industries, as well as for advanced study in this field. It also provides students with the opportunity to broaden their education in engineering and science or to expand their knowledge in a particular technical area by offering course foundations in four core areas: biomaterials, manufacturing with materials, sustainable materials processing and design of materials (including nanomaterials).

The first year of the program establishes fundamentals in math, chemistry, and physics with an introduction to design, communications and societal issues in Engineering. In second year, students are introduced to the structural and analytical characterization of materials, mechanics of solids, thermodynamics, diffusion and kinetics, fundamentals and processing of organic materials, and engineering statistics. Third-year is devoted to core courses in electrical and quantum mechanical properties of matter, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, phase transformations, process design, mechanical behaviour along with a full year materials manufacturing and design laboratory. Fourth-year has core courses in environmental degradation of materials and materials selection in design plus technical electives in the four core areas (for technical electives outside the calendar list provided please consult with the Associate Chair, Undergraduate). The fourth year of study also culminates in a senior design course, which integrates what students have learned in their prior studies. The technical aspects of the curriculum are complemented by communications, humanities and social sciences courses and by materials on leadership, ethics, team building and environmental responsibility which are distributed throughout the curriculum.

For students interested in pursuing an engineering minor, review the information in the Calendar on minors. By selecting courses that meet both MSE requirements and the requirements of the respective minor, a student can complete a minor during their studies.

Students interested in pursuing the Jeffrey Skoll BASc / MBA (SKOLL) Program should review the information on the program in the Calendar.

Graduate Programs in Materials Science and Engineering

The Graduate Department of Materials Science & Engineering offers MEng, MASc, and PhD degrees in extractive and physical metallurgy, materials science, nanomaterials, electronic and photonic materials and biomaterials. Admission information is available from the Graduate Advisor.

Research equipment includes modern facilities for optical, electron and X-ray microscopy, mechanical testing, particle characterization, the production of high temperatures and controlled atmospheres, calorimetric and other thermodynamic measurements at high temperatures, crystal growth, etc.

Research interests in the Department include process development, computer-aided materials engineering, physical chemistry of metal extraction, mineral processing, hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, powder metallurgy, solidification and crystal growth, welding, structure and mechanical properties of metallic, ceramic and composite materials, high strength polymers, nuclear materials, battery and super-capacitor materials, biomimetic materials, electronic and photonic materials, nanostructured materials and synthesis and design of biomaterials.

MATERIALS ENGINEERING (AEMMSBASC)

MATERIALS ENGINEERING (AEMMSBASC)

FIRST YEAR MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 1   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
APS100H1: Orientation to Engineering F 1 - 1 0.25
APS110H1: Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science F 3 1 1 0.50
APS111H1: Engineering Strategies & Practice I F 3 1 1 0.50
CIV100H1: Mechanics F 3 - 2 0.50
MAT186H1: Calculus I F 3 - 1 0.50
MAT188H1: Linear Algebra F 3 1 1 0.50
Winter Session - Year 1   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
APS106H1: Fundamentals of Computer Programming S 3 2 1 0.50
APS112H1: Engineering Strategies & Practice II S 2 2 - 0.50
ECE110H1: Electrical Fundamentals S 3 1 2 0.50
MAT187H1: Calculus II S 3 - 1 0.50
MSE120H1: Materials Engineering, Processing and Application S 3 1a 1 0.50
MSE191H1: Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering S 1 - - 0.15

Approved Course Substitutions

  1. Students are able to substitute MAT186H1 with the online calculus course APS162H1.
  2. Students are able to substitute MAT187H1 with the online calculus course APS163H1.
  3. Students are able to substitute APS110H1 with the online course APS164H1.
  4. Students are able to substitute CIV100H1 with the online course APS160H1.

SECOND YEAR MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 2   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MAT294H1: Calculus and Differential Equations F 3 - 2 0.50
MSE202H1: Thermodynamics I F 3 - 2 0.50
MSE219H1: Structure and Characterization of Materials F 3 3 1 0.50
MSE244H1: Inorganic Materials Chemistry and Processing F 3 3 1 0.50
MSE294H1: Communications I F 1 1a 1 0.25
MSE296H1: Materials Paradigm at a Glance I F 1a - - 0.15
Humanities/Complementary Studies Elective F - - - 0.50
Winter Session - Year 2   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MSE217H1: Diffusion and Kinetics S 3 - 2 0.50
MSE218H1: Phase Transformations S 3 2 1 0.50
MSE222H1: Mechanics of Solid Materials S 3 1.50 1.50 0.50
MSE238H1: Engineering Statistics and Numerical Methods S 3 2 2 0.50
MSE245H1: Organic Materials Chemistry and Properties S 3 3 1 0.50
MSE295H1: Communications II S 1 1a 1 0.25
MSE297H1: Materials Paradigm at a Glance II S 1a - - 0.15

Practical Experience Requirement - As described in the beginning pages of this chapter, students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience, before graduation, (normally acquired during summer vacation periods).

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR

Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enroll and participate in the Professional Experience Year Co-Op Program (PEY Co-Op). The PEY Co-op program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating industry. Details are described in the beginning of this chapter. More information can be found in the PEY Co-op section of the calendar. 

THIRD YEAR MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Fall Session – Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MIE258H1: Engineering Economics and Accounting F 3 - 1 0.50
MSE302H1: Thermodynamics II F 3 2 1 0.50
MSE316H1: Mechanical Behaviour of Materials F 3 2 1 0.50
MSE351H1: Design and Sim of Materials Processes F 3 2 1 0.50
MSE396H1: Materials Manufacturing and Design I F 3 1 2 0.50
CS/HSS or Technical Elective F - - - 0.50
Winter Session – Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MSE332H1: Heat and Mass Transfer for Materials Processing S 3 - 2 0.50
MSE335H1: Materials Physics S 3 - 1 0.50
MSE355H1: Materials Production S 3 - 1 0.50
MSE397H1: Materials Manufacturing and Design II S 3 1 2 0.50
CS/HSS or Technical Elective S - - - 0.50
CS/HSS or Technical Elective S - - - 0.50

3rd Year Technical Electives

The flexibility for students to choose 1 course in each of the third year terms from the categories: Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS), Complementary Studies (CS) or Technical Electives (TE) offers the opportunity for early streamlining of individual course selections to accommodate students’ preferences for areas of specialization. For example, the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering offers several Minors and Certificate Programs which require third year Technical Electives courses in various programs. Similarly, students who wish to specialize in eligible 4th year subject areas offered by other programs should consult the calendar for third year prerequisite courses.

The MSE Department Technical Electives can be categorized into four theme areas: Biomaterials, Sustainable Materials Processing, Manufacturing with Materials and Design of Materials. The tables below list the third year Technical Electives, organized by theme areas. Students can choose to take courses from different themes. A total of 5 Technical Electives are required for graduation and can be taken between Years 3 and 4, and of the 5 Technical Electives, at least two of which must be from the 400-/500- level. Other courses can also be considered and students should consult with the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies for approval. Students who do not select HSS/CS courses in third year must take these in fourth year to meet the minimum number of HSS/CS weight units required by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB).


Biomaterials Theme - Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
BME331H1: Physiological Control Systems S 3 1 1 0.50
CHE353H1: Engineering Biology F 2 - 2 0.50
CHE354H1: Cellular and Molecular Biology S 3 1 2 0.50
MSE343H1: Biomaterials F 3 - 1 0.50

Design of Materials Theme – Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHM325H1: Introduction to Inorganic and Polymer Materials Chemistry S 3 - - 0.50
MSE459H1: Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials F 3 2 - 0.50

Sustainable Materials Processing Theme – Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE324H1: Process Design F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE332H1: Reaction Kinetics F 3 - 2 0.50
MSE437H1: Process Metallurgy of Iron and Steel F 2 - 1 0.50
CHE333H1: Chemical Reaction Engineering S 3 - 2 0.50
MSE301H1: Mineral Processing S 3 1.50 1 0.50

Manufacturing with Materials Theme – Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MIE221H1: Manufacturing Engineering S 3 2 1 0.50
MIE243H1: Mechanical Engineering Design F 3 2 2 0.50
MIE304H1: Introduction to Quality Control S 3 1 2 0.50
MIE311H1: Thermal Energy Conversion S 3 3 - 0.50
MIE320H1: Mechanics of Solids II S 3 1.50 2 0.50
MIE342H1: Circuits with Applications to Mechanical Engineering Systems F 3 1.50 1 0.50
MIE364H1: Quality Control and Improvement S 3 1 2 0.50

CS/HSS Requirement - In order to fulfill degree and Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) requirements, each student must take a total of 4 half year (or 2 full year) Complementary Studies (CS) Electives. Two of those CS electives must be Humanities/Social Sciences (HSS) courses. In MSE, these courses are taken in 2nd and 3rd years. (Note: Students may choose to take technical electives in 3rd year instead; and, then take their CS/HSS courses in 4th year.) Since students are responsible for ensuring that each CS/HSS elective taken is an approved course, be sure to consult the electives list on the Faculty of Engineering's Registrar’s Office website.

Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) Requirements

In order to complete the MSE Program of Study, students are responsible for ensuring that they have taken all the required core courses, the correct number of Technical Electives, HSS/CS electives (total 1.0 credit of each) and a Free Elective.

To satisfy the CEAB requirements, students must accumulate, during their studies, a minimum total number of "accreditation units" (AUs) as well as a minimum number of AUs in six specific categories: complementary studies, mathematics, natural science, engineering science, engineering design, and combined engineering science & design.

FOURTH YEAR MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Fall Session – Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MSE415H1: Environmental Degradation of Materials F 3 - 2 0.50
MSE443H1: Composite Materials Engineering F 3 - - 0.50
MSE498Y1: Capstone Project: Design of Materials Processes Y 2a 1 2 1.00
Technical Elective F - - - 0.50
CS/HSS or Technical Elective F - - - 0.50
Winter Session – Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MSE490H1: Professional Ethics and Practice S 2 - - 0.25
MSE498Y1: Capstone Project: Design of Materials Processes Y 2a 1 2 1.00
Technical Elective S - - - 0.50
Technical Elective S - - - 0.50
CS/HSS or Technical Elective S - - - 0.50
Free Elective S - - - 0.50

4th Year Technical Electives

The MSE Department Technical Electives can be categorized into four theme areas: Biomaterials, Sustainable Materials Processing, Manufacturing with Materials and Design of Materials. The tables below list the third year Technical Electives, organized by theme areas. Students can choose to take courses from different themes. A total of 5 Technical Electives are required for graduation and can be taken between Years 3 and 4, and of the 5 Technical Electives, at least two of which must be from the 400-/500- level. Other courses can be considered and students should consult with the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies for approval. Students who do not select HSS/CS courses in third year must take these in fourth year to meet the minimum number of HSS/CS weight units required by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB). Please note that all fourth-year technical electives may not be offered every year.

Students are able to substitute MSE498Y1 with one of the following courses: APS490Y1, BME498Y1, or BME499Y1.

Thesis Electives - Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MSE492H1: Research Thesis I F - 4 1 0.50
MSE493H1: Research Thesis II S - 4 1 0.50

Biomaterials Theme – Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE353H1: Engineering Biology F 2 - 2 0.50
CHE354H1: Cellular and Molecular Biology S 3 1 2 0.50
CHE562H1: Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering F 3 - - 0.50
MSE438H1: Computational Materials Design F 3 1 - 0.50
MSE440H1: Biomaterial Processing and Properties F 3 - 1 0.50

Design of Materials Theme – Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MSE401H1: Materials Information in Design F 3 2 1 0.50
MSE403H1: Data Sciences and Analytics for Materials Engineers S 3 2 1 0.50
MSE430H1: Electronic Materials F 2 - 1 0.50
MSE435H1: Optical and Photonic Materials S 3 2 2 0.50
MSE438H1: Computational Materials Design F 3 1 - 0.50
MSE458H1: Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems S 3 - 2 0.50
MSE459H1: Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials F 3 2 - 0.50
MSE462H1: Materials Physics II S 2 - 1 0.50
MSE465H1: Application of Artificial Intelligence in Materials Design F 2 1 - 0.50
MSE467H1: Multiscale Modeling of Materials Failure S 2 1 - 0.50
MSE468H1: Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Engineering Materials   - - - 0.50

Sustainable Materials Processing Theme - Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE565H1: Aqueous Process Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
FOR424H1: Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials S 2 - 1 0.50
MSE301H1: Mineral Processing S 3 1.50 1 0.50
MSE438H1: Computational Materials Design F 3 1 - 0.50

Manufacturing with Materials Theme - Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MSE403H1: Data Sciences and Analytics for Materials Engineers S 3 2 1 0.50
MSE419H1: Fracture and Failure Analysis F 3 - 1 0.50
MSE431H1: Forensic Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
MSE438H1: Computational Materials Design F 3 1 - 0.50
MSE461H1: Engineered Ceramics F 3 - 2 0.50
MSE465H1: Application of Artificial Intelligence in Materials Design F 2 1 - 0.50
MSE467H1: Multiscale Modeling of Materials Failure S 2 1 - 0.50
MSE468H1: Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Engineering Materials   - - - 0.50

Materials Science and Engineering Courses

Applied Science and Engineering (Interdepartmental)

APS100H1 - Orientation to Engineering

APS100H1 - Orientation to Engineering
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/12.8T

This course is designed to help students transition into first-year engineering studies and to develop and apply a greater understanding of the academic learning environment, the field of engineering, and how the fundamental mathematics and sciences are used in an engineering context. Topics covered include: study skills, time management, problem solving, successful teamwork, effective communications, exam preparation, stress management and wellness, undergraduate research, extra- and co-curricular involvement, engineering disciplines and career opportunities, and applications of math and science in engineering.

Total AUs: 17.7 (Fall), 19.2 (Winter), 36.9 (Full Year)

APS106H1 - Fundamentals of Computer Programming

APS106H1 - Fundamentals of Computer Programming
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

An introduction to computer systems and software. Topics include the representation of information, algorithms, programming languages, operating systems and software engineering. Emphasis is on the design of algorithms and their implementation in software. Students will develop a competency in the Python programming language. Laboratory exercises will explore the concepts of both Structure-based and Object-Oriented programming using examples drawn from mathematics and engineering applications.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

APS110H1 - Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science

APS110H1 - Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course is structured around the principle of the structure-property relationship. This relationship refers to an understanding of the microstructure of a solid, that is, the nature of the bonds between atoms and the spatial arrangement of atoms, which permits the explanation of observed behaviour. Observed materials behaviour includes mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical, and corrosive behaviour. Topics covered in this course include: structure of the atom, models of the atom, electronic configuration, the electromagnetic spectrum, band theory, atomic bonding, optical transparency of solids, magnetic properties, molecular bonding, hybridized orbitals, crystal systems, lattices and structures, crystallographic notation, imperfections in solids, reaction rates, activation energy, solid-state diffusion, materials thermodynamics, free energy, and phase equilibrium.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

APS111H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice I

APS111H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for understanding problem solving and developing communications skills. This first course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to the process of engineering design, to strategies for successful team work, and to design for human factors, society and the environment. Students write team and individual technical reports.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

APS112H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice II

APS112H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6P

This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process, problem solving and project management. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for practicing team skills and developing communications skills. Building on the first course, this second course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to project management and to the design process in greater depth. Students work in teams on a term length design project. Students will write a series of technical reports and give a team based design project presentation.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering

BME331H1 - Physiological Control Systems

BME331H1 - Physiological Control Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Introduces physiological concepts and selected physiological control systems present in the human body, and proposes quantitative modeling approaches for these systems. Topics covered will include (1) the endocrine system and its subsystems, including glucose regulation and the stress response, (2) the cardiovascular system and related aspects such as cardiac output, venous return, control of blood flow by the tissues, and nervous regulation of circulation, and (3) the nervous and musculoskeletal systems, including the control of voluntary motion. Linear control theory will be used to develop skills in system modeling and examine concepts of system response and system control in the context of a healthy human body.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

CHE332H1 - Reaction Kinetics

CHE332H1 - Reaction Kinetics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The rates of chemical processes. Topics include: measurement of reaction rates, reaction orders and activation energies; theories of reaction rates; reaction mechanisms and networks; development of the rate law for simple and complex kinetic schemes; approach to equilibrium; homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. Performance of simple chemical reactor types.

Prerequisite: CHE210H1, CHE222H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE333H1 - Chemical Reaction Engineering

CHE333H1 - Chemical Reaction Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Covers the basics of simple reactor design and performance, with emphasis on unifying the concepts in kinetics, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. Topics include flow and residence time distributions in various reactor types as well as the influence of transport properties (bulk and interphase) on kinetics and reactor performance. The interplay of these facets of reaction engineering is illustrated by use of appropriate computer simulations.

Prerequisite: CHE323H1, CHE324H1, CHE332H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE353H1 - Engineering Biology

CHE353H1 - Engineering Biology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

Using a quantitative, problem solving approach, this course will introduce basic concepts in cell biology and physiology. Various engineering modelling tools will be used to investigate aspects of cell growth and metabolism, transport across cell membranes, protein structure, homeostasis, nerve conduction and mechanical forces in biology.

Exclusion: BME205H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE354H1 - Cellular and Molecular Biology

CHE354H1 - Cellular and Molecular Biology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

This course will cover the principles of molecular and cellular biology as they apply to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics will include: metabolic conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; nucleic acids; enzymology; structure and function relationships within cells; and motility and growth. Genetic analysis, immunohistochemistry, hybridomis, cloning, recombinant DNA and biotechnology will also be covered. This course will appeal to students interested in environmental microbiology, biomaterials and tissue engineering, and bioprocesses.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

CHE562H1 - Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering

CHE562H1 - Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course serves as an introduction to concepts in polymer chemistry, polymer science and polymer engineering. This includes a discussion of the mechanisms of step growth, chain growth and ring-opening polymerizations with a focus on industrially relevant polymers and processes. The description of polymers in solution as well as the solid state will be explored. Several modern polymer characterization techniques are introduced including gel permeation chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis and others.

Exclusion: CHM426H1
Recommended Preparation: CHE213H1, CHE220H1 or equivalents
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE565H1 - Aqueous Process Engineering

CHE565H1 - Aqueous Process Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Application of aqueous chemical processing to mineral, environmental and industrial engineering. The course involves an introduction to the theory of electrolyte solutions, mineral-water interfaces, dissolution and crystallization processes, metal ion separations, and electrochemical processes in aqueous reactive systems. Applications and practice of (1) metal recovery from primary (i.e. ores) and secondary (i.e. recycled) sources by hydrometallurgical means, (2) treatment of aqueous waste streams for environmental protection, and (3) production of high-value-added inorganic materials.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Civil Engineering

CIV100H1 - Mechanics

CIV100H1 - Mechanics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The principles of statics are applied to composition and resolution of forces, moments and couples. The equilibrium states of structures are examined. Throughout, the free body diagram concept is emphasized. Vector algebra is used where it is most useful, and stress blocks are introduced. Shear force diagrams, bending moment diagrams and stress-strain relationships for materials are discussed. Stress and deformation in axially loaded members and flexural members (beams) are also covered.

Exclusion: APS160H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Electrical and Computer Engineering

ECE110H1 - Electrical Fundamentals

ECE110H1 - Electrical Fundamentals
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

An overview of the physics of electricity and magnetism: Coulomb's law, Gauss' law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law. Physics of capacitors, resistors and inductors. An introduction to circuit analysis: resistive circuits, nodal and mesh analysis, 1st order RC and RL transient response and sinusoidal steady-state analysis.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

ECE335H1 - Introduction to Electronic Devices

ECE335H1 - Introduction to Electronic Devices
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Electrical behaviour of semiconductor structures and devices. Metal-semiconductor contacts; pn junctions, diodes, photodetectors, LED's; bipolar junction transistors, Ebers-Moll and hybrid-pi models; field effect transistors, MOSFET, JFET/MESFET structures and models; thyristors and semiconductor lasers.

Prerequisite: MAT291H1 and ECE221H1 and ECE231H1
Exclusion: MSE335H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Forestry

FOR424H1 - Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials

FOR424H1 - Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

Sustainable materials are a mandate for sustainable societies. This course will explore the manufacturing, engineering principles and design fundamentals for creating sustainable materials from renewable resources. Special emphasis will be on bioplastics, biofibre, nanobiofibre, biocomposites and nanobiocomposites. Written communication and design skills will be developed through tutorials and assignments.

Exclusion: FOR423H1
Recommended Preparation: Basic knowledge of materials science.
Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

Mathematics

MAT186H1 - Calculus I

MAT186H1 - Calculus I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Topics include: limits and continuity; differentiation; applications of the derivative - related rates problems, curve sketching, optimization problems, L'Hopital's rule; definite and indefinite integrals; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications of integration in geometry, mechanics and other engineering problems.

Exclusion: APS162H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MAT187H1 - Calculus II

MAT187H1 - Calculus II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Topics include: techniques of integration, an introduction to mathematical modeling with differential equations, infinite sequences and series, Taylor series, parametric and polar curves, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, and application to mechanics and other engineering problems.

Prerequisite: APS162H1/MAT186H1
Exclusion: APS163H1/MAT197H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MAT188H1 - Linear Algebra

MAT188H1 - Linear Algebra
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course covers systems of linear equations and Gaussian elimination, applications; vectors in Rn, independent sets and spanning sets; linear transformations, matrices, inverses; subspaces in Rn, basis and dimension; determinants; eigenvalues and diagonalization; systems of differential equations; dot products and orthogonal sets in Rn; projections and the Gram-Schmidt process; diagonalizing symmetric matrices; least squares approximation. Includes an introduction to numeric computation in a weekly laboratory.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MAT294H1 - Calculus and Differential Equations

MAT294H1 - Calculus and Differential Equations
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Partial differentiation, grad, div, curl, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, differential equations, first order differential equations, homogeneous linear differential equations, boundary conditions. Formulation of various problems relevant to materials and mining engineering - the concepts above are used.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

MIE221H1 - Manufacturing Engineering

MIE221H1 - Manufacturing Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

Production Fundamentals: Metal casting; metal forming - rolling, forging, extrusion and drawing, and sheet-metal forming; plastic/ceramic/glass forming; metal removal - turning, drilling/ boring/reaming, milling, and grinding; non-traditional machining - ECM, EDM and laser cutting; welding; surface treatment; metrology. Environmental issues in manufacturing processes, recycling of materials. Automation Fundamentals: Automation in material processing and handling - NC, robotics and automatically-guided vehicles; flexible manufacturing - group technology, cellular manufacturing and FMS; and computer-aided design - geometric modelling, computer graphics, concurrent engineering and rapid prototyping.

Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE243H1 - Mechanical Engineering Design

MIE243H1 - Mechanical Engineering Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/25.6P

Introduction to basic mechanical parts and mechanisms: gears, cams, bearings, linkages, actuators and motors, chain and belt drives, brakes and clutches, hydraulics and pneumatics. Tutorials on engineering drawing, sketching, and CAD/CAM in SolidWorks: views and drawing types, 2D sketching, 3D modeling and engineering drawing generation, modeling of assembly and motion analysis/animation. Conceptual design examples and mechanical engineering design process, including selection and applications of mechanisms. Dissection and reverse engineering of selected mechanical devices, mechanisms, and subsystems. Competitive group design project including technical report and 3D printing.

Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.

Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

MIE258H1 - Engineering Economics and Accounting

MIE258H1 - Engineering Economics and Accounting
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Engineering economic and accounting concepts needed in the design of engineering systems. Financial analysis topics include: financial statements, depreciation, income tax, and basic accounting techniques. Project analysis topics includes: time value of money, evaluation of cash flows, defining alternatives, analysis of independent projects, acceptance criteria, buy or lease, make or buy, replacement analysis, economic analysis in the public sector, project risk and uncertainty. Inflation concepts.

Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent
Exclusion: CHE249H1, CHE374H1, CME368H1, ECE472H1, MIE358H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE304H1 - Introduction to Quality Control

MIE304H1 - Introduction to Quality Control
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

Introduction to quality engineering. Quality standards and certification. TQM. Modeling processes with simulation. Making inferences about product quality from real or simulation output data. Introduction to statistical process control. Control charts for variables and attributes. Process capability analysis. Lot Acceptance Sampling.

Prerequisite: MIE231 or equivalent
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE311H1 - Thermal Energy Conversion

MIE311H1 - Thermal Energy Conversion
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

Engineering applications of thermodynamics in the analysis and design of heat engines and other thermal energy conversion processes within an environmental framework. Steam power plants, gas cycles in internal combustion engines, gas turbines and jet engines. Refrigeration, psychrometry and air conditioning. Fossil fuel combustion and advanced systems includes fuel cells.

Prerequisite: MIE210H1, MIE313H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE364H1 - Quality Control and Improvement

MIE364H1 - Quality Control and Improvement
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

In manufacturing and service industries alike, quality is viewed as an important strategic tool for increasing competitiveness. Continuous quality improvement is a key factor leading to a company's success. With more emphasis on quality, the cost and the product cycle time are reduced and the communication between producer and customer is improved. The course focuses on the following topics: introduction to quality engineering, TQM, quality standards, supplier-producer relations and quality certification, costs of quality, statistical process control for long and short production runs, process capability analysis and acceptance sampling, quality certification, six sigma quality, quality improvement using designed experiments and an overview of the Taguchi Methods.

Prerequisite: MIE236H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

Materials Science and Engineering

MSE120H1 - Materials Engineering, Processing and Application

MSE120H1 - Materials Engineering, Processing and Application
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/6.4T/12.8P

This course covers an introduction to the field of materials science and engineering following a design-led approach. Application areas such as stiffness-limited design, fracture-limited design, strength-limited design will be used to guide further investigations into elements of the processing-structure-properties-performance paradigm. Topics covered will include material property charts, computer-aided design and materials selection, crystallographic planes and directions, crystal structures, stiffness, strength, plasticity, yielding, ductility, fracture and fracture toughness, cyclic loading and fatigue, friction and wear, thermal properties of materials, electrical properties, optical properties, materials corrosion, and materials processing.

Total AUs: 44.3 (Fall), 48 (Winter), 92.3 (Full Year)

MSE191H1 - Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

MSE191H1 - Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering
Credit Value: 0.15
Hours: 12.8L

This is a seminar series that will introduce students to the community, upper-year experience, and core fields of Materials Science and Engineering. Seminar presenters will represent the major areas in Materials Science and Engineering and will also be drawn from an array of groups, including students, staff, faculty, and alumni. The format will vary and may include application examples, case studies, career opportunities, and research talks. The purpose of the seminar series is to provide first year students with some understanding of the various options within the Department to enable them to make educated choices as they progress through the program. This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis.

Total AUs: 11.8 (Fall), 12.8 (Winter), 24.6 (Full Year)

MSE202H1 - Thermodynamics I

MSE202H1 - Thermodynamics I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The three laws of thermodynamics, Heat capacity theory and Debye's law. Calculations of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of pure materials and reactions. Reversible and irreversible processes. Gibbs free energy, chemical equilibria, and phase rule. Introduction of Ellingham, Pourbaix, and pre-dominance area diagrams. Treatment of ideal and non-ideal solutions with the introduction of the concept of activity and activity coefficient. Binary and ternary phase diagrams and their applications to materials processing and materials properties. Thermodynamics of electrochemical systems.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE217H1 - Diffusion and Kinetics

MSE217H1 - Diffusion and Kinetics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Topics in the Diffusion part include: diffusion mechanisms, steady-state and non-steady-state diffusion, Fick's first and second laws, Kirkendall effect, short-circuit diffusions, diffusion in metallic, polymeric, ionic and semiconducting materials, Darken's first and second equations, marker's velocity, thin film diffusion. Topics in the Kinetics part include: experimental rate laws, reaction orders, determination of order of reaction (integral, differential, and half-life methods), Arrhenius equation, elucidation of mechanism, fluid-particle reactions, kinetic models (progressive-conversion, unreacted core, shrinking core model), reactor design (batch, plug flow, and mixed flow reactors).

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE218H1 - Phase Transformations

MSE218H1 - Phase Transformations
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/13T/20P

A key part of MSE is focused on explaining how material systems transform from one condensed phase to another. These phase transformations are a critical aspect of understanding the behaviour of a material. MSE 218 builds on the thermodynamics and phase stability of MSE 202 and runs in parallel to the rates of transformation seen in MSE 217. In MSE 218 we will consider phase transformations in one component, two component, and multicomponent systems. We will look at both diffusional and diffusionless transformations, focusing on the nucleation and growth aspects of each case. Specific examples will include: solidification, precipitation, recrystallization, spinodal, massive, and order-disorder transformations. Both experimental and computational labs will be used to outline specific transformations in more depth.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE219H1 - Structure and Characterization of Materials

MSE219H1 - Structure and Characterization of Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/13T/39P

Introduction to two and three-dimensional crystallography and crystal structures of solids. Topics include: Pearson and Hermann-Mauguin symbols, reciprocal space, point group and space group symmetry analysis, stereographic projections. Introduction to tensor analysis of crystalline material properties, and symmetry breakdown by imperfections in crystals. Experimental techniques used to interpret structure and chemistry of solids and their defects will be covered theoretically and in the laboratory including: X-ray diffractometry, optical, electron and scanning probe microscopy, and surface/bulk spectroscopies based on optical, X-ray, electron and ion-beam analysis methods.

Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

MSE222H1 - Mechanics of Solid Materials

MSE222H1 - Mechanics of Solid Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/19.2T/19.2P

Principles of stress and strains; Axial loading; Torsion; Shear forces and bending moments; Stresses in Beams; Plane stresses and strains; Pressure vessels; Deflection of beams; Introduction to Finite Element Analysis

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MSE238H1 - Engineering Statistics and Numerical Methods

MSE238H1 - Engineering Statistics and Numerical Methods
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/25.6P

This course will teach engineering statistics and numerical methods with Python. Topics on statistics will include probability theory, hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous distribution, analysis of variance, sampling distributions, parameter estimation, regression analysis, statistical quality control and six-sigma. The topics on numerical methods will include curve fitting and interpolation, solving linear and nonlinear equations, numerical differentiation and integration, solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, initial and boundary value problems.

Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

MSE244H1 - Inorganic Materials Chemistry and Processing

MSE244H1 - Inorganic Materials Chemistry and Processing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/38.4P

Basic materials processing flowsheet including priIntroduction to atomic and molecular structures, acid-base and redox reactions, transition metal complexes, and detailed chemical properties of the main group elements in the periodic table. Examples of industrial practice in metal processing industry and energy generation/storage technologies. Hands-on qualitative and quantitative analyses of inorganic compounds, by both classical "wet" volumetric and instrumental methods.mary processing and recycling of materials. Materials and energy balance of individual units and of overall process flowsheets. Use of computer software for flowsheet evaluation. Translating process flowsheets to resource and utility requirements, capital/operating cost, and environmental impact of processing operations. Basics of equipment sizing, operation scheduling, and plant layout.

Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

MSE245H1 - Organic Materials Chemistry and Properties

MSE245H1 - Organic Materials Chemistry and Properties
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/38.4P

Introduction to organic chemistry and organic materials. Naming, bonding and shapes of organic molecules. Properties and reactions of organic compounds. Key mechanisms including electrophilic addition, nucleophilic aliphatic substitution, β-elimination reactions and electrophilic aromatic substitution. Syntheses of polymers (step-growth and radical chain growth polymerization) and processing methods. Structure and properties of polymeric materials (amorphous, crystalline, elastomeric). Thermo-transition properties of polymers. Life-cycle of polymers, mechanisms of degradation and strategies of polymer recycle. Hands-on organic syntheses and separation experiments.

Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

MSE294H1 - Communications I

MSE294H1 - Communications I
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/12.8T/6.4P

This is part I of two laboratory, tutorial, and lecture courses building on the communication principles students learned in first year. Students will work in teams on open-ended design projects, and scaffolded assignments will provide students the opportunity to report on their projects in written reports, podium presentations, and poster presentations. The projects in this course are supported by laboratory exercises and tutorial activities.

Exclusion: MSE298Y1H
Recommended Preparation: APS111H1, APS112H1
Total AUs: 20.7 (Fall), 22.4 (Winter), 43.1 (Full Year)

MSE295H1 - Communications II

MSE295H1 - Communications II
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/12.8T/6.4P

This is part II of two laboratory, tutorial, and lecture courses building on the communication principles students learned in first year. Students will work in teams on open-ended design projects, and scaffolded assignments will provide students the opportunity to report on their projects in written reports, podium presentations, and poster presentations. The projects in this course are supported by laboratory exercises and tutorial activities.

Prerequisite: MSE294H1
Exclusion: MSE298Y1
Recommended Preparation: APS111H1, APS112H1
Total AUs: 20.7 (Fall), 22.4 (Winter), 43.1 (Full Year)

MSE296H1 - Materials Paradigm at a Glance I

MSE296H1 - Materials Paradigm at a Glance I
Credit Value: 0.15
Hours: 6.4L

Materials come in all sorts of forms and exhibit a wide range of behaviors, yet there is more in common to their explanation than there is difference. MSE296 & MSE297 will put the threads from the second year curriculum into a common informational framework more reflective of the emerging state-space based materials paradigm. This course will meet on a biweekly basis. Credit is obtained by participating in in-class exercises.

Total AUs: 5.9 (Fall), 6.4 (Winter), 12.3 (Full Year)

MSE297H1 - Materials Paradigm at a Glance II

MSE297H1 - Materials Paradigm at a Glance II
Credit Value: 0.15
Hours: 6.4L

Materials come in all sorts of forms and exhibit a wide range of behaviors, yet there is more in common to their explanation than there is difference. MSE296 & MSE297 will put the threads from the second year curriculum into a common informational framework more reflective of the emerging state-space based materials paradigm. This course will meet on a biweekly basis. Credit is obtained by participating in in-class exercises.

Total AUs: 5.9 (Fall), 6.4 (Winter), 12.3 (Full Year)

MSE301H1 - Mineral Processing

MSE301H1 - Mineral Processing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Introduction to the theory and practice of mineral beneficiation. Topics covered include comminution, sizing, froth flotation, gravity separation, magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, dewatering and tailings management. The course also covers relevant aspects of sampling, particle size measurement, metallurgical accounting, material balances, surface chemistry and the movement of solid particles in liquid media. Open to 3rd and 4th year Minerals, Materials, and Chemical Engineering students, or with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: MIN225H1 or MSE244H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

MSE302H1 - Thermodynamics II

MSE302H1 - Thermodynamics II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

Introduction to statistical thermodynamics. The concept of chemical potential and its application in solution thermodynamics. Solution models. Equilibrium in multi-component, multi-phase systems. Thermodynamics of surfaces and interfaces. Applied thermodynamics with examples of industrial applications. Computational thermodynamics.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MSE316H1 - Mechanical Behaviour of Materials

MSE316H1 - Mechanical Behaviour of Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

The mechanical behaviour of engineering materials including metals, alloys, ceramics and polymeric materials. The following topics will be discussed: macro- and micro-structural response of materials to external loads; load-displacement and stress-strain relationships, processes and mechanisms of elastic, visco-elastic, plastic and creep deformation, crystallographic aspects of plastic flow, effect of defects on mechanical behaviour, strain hardening theory, strengthening mechanisms and mechanical testing.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MSE332H1 - Heat and Mass Transfer for Materials Processing

MSE332H1 - Heat and Mass Transfer for Materials Processing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Fundamental concepts of heat and mass transfer as applied in materials engineering. Steady state and transient analysis in slabs, cylinders and spheres through solutions of problems in metallurgy and material processing. Similarity between heat and mass transfer. Concepts of momentum, mass and thermal boundary layers. Coupled problems.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE335H1 - Materials Physics

MSE335H1 - Materials Physics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/13T

Application of solid state physics to describe properties of materials. Thermal properties of solids: lattice vibrations (phonons), heat capacity, thermal conductivity. Electrical properties of metals: simple circuits, resistivity of metals (classical and quantum descriptions), Seebeck, Peltier, and Thomson effects. Electrical properties of semiconductors: band structure and occupancy, conductivity, Hall effect, simple devices. Electrical properties of insulators: polarization, capacitance, optical properties, ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Magnetic properties: diamagnetism and paramagnetism, ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic materials, magnetic domains, B-H curves.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE343H1 - Biomaterials

MSE343H1 - Biomaterials
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 26L/13P

Provides an overview of the field of biomaterials, introducing fundamental biological and materials design and selection concepts, and is open to CHE students. Key applications of materials for biomedical devices will be covered, along with an introduction to the expected biological responses. The concept of biocompatibility will be introduced along with the essential elements of biology related to an understanding of this criterion for biomaterial selection and implant design. In addition, structure-property relationships in both biological and bio-inspired materials will be highlighted.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE351H1 - Design and Sim of Materials Processes

MSE351H1 - Design and Sim of Materials Processes
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 36L/12T/24P

An overview of computer modeling approaches to analyze various macro-scale phenomena involved in materials processing, product design, and manufacturing. These approaches will include weighted residual methods, finite element and finite difference methods, computational fluid dynamics, and multiphysics simulations. The students will apply these methods to study heat transfer, fluid flow, stress analysis, structural dynamics, and coupled behavior. Practical experience will be provided on commercial finite element (FE) and computer-aided design (CAD) packages such as ANSYS and SOLIDWORKS.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MSE355H1 - Materials Production

MSE355H1 - Materials Production
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Materials life cycle, primary and secondary resources, resource life and sustainability. Technologies and unit operations used in the production of light metals, non-ferrous and ferrous metals. Energy use and conservation in production of materials. Benefits and technologies of recycling. Treatment of waste streams for value recovery and safe disposal

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE396H1 - Materials Manufacturing and Design I

MSE396H1 - Materials Manufacturing and Design I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

Bringing together concepts from across our entire curriculum, including Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Phase Transformations, Heat and Mass Transport, and Thermodynamics, this course explains the processing-microstructure-properties-performance paradigm underlying several manufacturing techniques. This part I of two courses connecting materials selection, CAD drawing (and simulation) and the basics of manufacturing methods for component and product design. The course culminates in a project in which students complete the design, prototyping, simulation, cost modelling and validation for product design of their own choosing.

Exclusion: MSE398Y1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MSE397H1 - Materials Manufacturing and Design II

MSE397H1 - Materials Manufacturing and Design II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

Bringing together concepts from across our entire curriculum, including Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Phase Transformations, Heat and Mass Transport, and Thermodynamics, this course explains the processing-microstructure-properties-performance paradigm underlying several manufacturing techniques. This part II of two courses connecting materials selection, CAD drawing (and simulation) and the basics of manufacturing methods for component and product design. The course culminates in a project in which students complete the design, prototyping, simulation, cost modelling and validation for product design of their own choosing.

Prerequisite: MSE396H1
Exclusion: MSE398Y1Y
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MSE401H1 - Materials Information in Design

MSE401H1 - Materials Information in Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/25.6P

This course presents approaches to composite and structural design, and optimization, for components and products. Tools for optimization, material property data analytics, and structural simulation will be used. We will apply advanced materials selection (and the CES materials database) to product and component design, and hybrid (composite) materials design. Composite mechanics theory and topology optimization will be developed for structural optimization. Finally, modern techniques including AI and machine learning will be presented for aspects of materials selection, composite design and structural optimization. Component design decisions will include both material properties and the capabilities of applicable fabrication processes, to identify the material and process which best satisfy the design requirements.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE403H1 - Data Sciences and Analytics for Materials Engineers

MSE403H1 - Data Sciences and Analytics for Materials Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6P

Introduces the elements of data sciences, materials informatics and data analytics in materials science and engineering. The focus will be on the applications of this emerging field for accelerated materials development. The students will also be exposed to machine learning approaches such as supervised and unsupervised learning; linear, non-linear, and logistic regression, decision trees, and artificial neural networks. They will also be trained on programming these algorithms in python and applying them for a set of case studies pertaining to structure-property relations in materials science, alloy design, additive manufacturing, and green energy technologies.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE415H1 - Environmental Degradation of Materials

MSE415H1 - Environmental Degradation of Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course deals with four major areas: electrochemistry of low temperature aqueous solvents, the corrosion of materials, mechano-chemical effects in materials and corrosion prevention in design. Electrochemistry deals with thermodynamics of material-electrolyte systems involving ion-solvent, ion-ion interactions, activity coefficients, Nernst equation and Pourbaix diagrams, and rate theory through activation and concentration polarization. Corrosion of metallic, polymeric, ceramic, composite, electronic and biomaterials will be explored along with mechano-chemical effects of stress corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion fatigue. Corrosion prevention in terms of case histories and the use of expert systems in materials selection.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE419H1 - Fracture and Failure Analysis

MSE419H1 - Fracture and Failure Analysis
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Fracture mechanisms and mechanics of solid materials. Topics include: nature of brittle and ductile fracture, macro-phenomena and micro-mechanisms of failure of various materials, mechanisms of fatigue; crack nucleation and propagation, Griffith theory, stress field at crack tips, stress intensity factor and fracture toughness, crack opening displacement, energy principle and the J-integral, fracture mechanics in fatigue, da/dN curves and their significance. Practical examples of fatigue analysis and fundamentals of non-destructive testing.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE430H1 - Electronic Materials

MSE430H1 - Electronic Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 26L/13T

Materials parameters and electronic properties of semiconductors are discussed as basic factors in the engineering of semiconductor devices. Materials parameters are related to preparation and processing methods, and thus to the electronic properties. The implications of materials parameters and properties on selected simple devices are discussed.

Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

MSE431H1 - Forensic Engineering

MSE431H1 - Forensic Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The course provides participants with an understanding of scientific and engineering investigation methods and tools to assess potential sources, causes and solutions for prevention of failure due to natural accidents, fire, high and low speed impacts, design defects, improper selection of materials, manufacturing defects, improper service conditions, inadequate maintenance and human error. The fundamentals of accident reconstruction principles and procedures for origin and cause investigations are demonstrated through a wide range of real world case studies including: medical devices, sports equipment, electronic devices, vehicular collisions, structural collapse, corrosion failures, weld failures, fire investigations and patent infringements. Compliance with industry norms and standards, product liability, sources of liability, proving liability, defense against liability and other legal issues will be demonstrated with mock courtroom trial proceedings involving invited professionals to elucidate the role of an engineer as an expert witness in civil and criminal court proceedings.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE435H1 - Optical and Photonic Materials

MSE435H1 - Optical and Photonic Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/25.6P

Optical and photonic materials play a central role in a variety of application fields including telecommunications, metrology, manufacturing, medical surgery, computing, spectroscopy, holography, chemical synthesis, and robotics - to name a few. The properties of light and its interaction with matter lie at the heart of this ever-expanding list of applications. The syllabus comprises the nature of light, wave motion, lasers, interference, coherence, fibre optics, diffraction, polarized light, photonic crystals, metamaterials, plasmonic materials, and practical design applications.

Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

MSE437H1 - Process Metallurgy of Iron and Steel

MSE437H1 - Process Metallurgy of Iron and Steel
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

The production and refining of liquid iron in the iron blast furnace, the production and refining of liquid steel, secondary refining operations, continuous casting and thermomechanical processing (hot rolling). Specialty steels and newly emerging technologies (e.g. thin slab casting, direct ironmaking) are also discussed in terms of process/environment and productivity. Downstream topics will include cold rolling, batch and continuous annealing, and coating operations.

Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

MSE438H1 - Computational Materials Design

MSE438H1 - Computational Materials Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/25.6P

Introduces computational design of materials at atomic scale by focusing on two of the most powerful techniques - density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD). At the heart of both these techniques lies atomistic understanding originating from quantum mechanics; thus the initial lectures will review basics of quantum mechanics to inspire the foundational principles of modern-day DFT approaches. Thereafter theoretical background of DFT and its implementation and application for materials design will be covered. Specific topics on DFT will include Kohn-Sham equations, plane-wave basis sets, exchange and correlation, and nudged-elastic band calculations. Topics concerning MD will include foundational principles, Born-Oppenheimer hypothesis, time integration schemes such as velocity-verlet scheme, and interatomic potential functions. Finally, students will be exposed to the concepts and case-studies pertaining to multi-scale modeling. A particular emphasis of the course is providing hands-on training on open source software packages such as VESTA, Quantum-ESPRESSO, and LAMMPS.

Prerequisite: MSE335H1/PHY356H1/PHY452H1/ECE330H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE440H1 - Biomaterial Processing and Properties

MSE440H1 - Biomaterial Processing and Properties
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/13T

Currently used biomaterials for formation of surgical implants and dental restorations include selected metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites. The selection and processing of these materials to satisfy biocompatibility and functional requirements for applications in selected areas will be presented. Materials used for forming scaffolds for tissue engineering, and strategies for repair, regeneration and augmentation of degenerated or traumatized tissues will be reviewed with a focus on biocompatibility issues and required functionality for the intended applications.

Prerequisite: MSE343H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE443H1 - Composite Materials Engineering

MSE443H1 - Composite Materials Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course is designed to provide an integrated approach to composite materials design, and provide a strong foundation for further studies and research on these materials. Topics include: structure, processing, and properties of composite materials; design of fillers reinforcements and matrices reinforcements, reinforcement forms, nanocomposites systems, manufacturing processes, testing and properties, micro and macromechanics modeling of composite systems; and new applications of composites in various sectors.

Exclusion: CHE461H1 and MSE330H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

MSE455H1 - Process Simulation and Computer Design

MSE455H1 - Process Simulation and Computer Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Various production processes use simulation software to shorten the route from the initial design to finished product. Simulation software provides the designer and practicing engineer with a powerful tool in the tasks of improving and optimizing the industrial processes. Expensive trials can be avoided and the quality of the finished product secured from the beginning of production. First, this course will cover the basics of the process simulation used in industrial setting. Subsequently, the course will focus on industrial process simulation software used extensively in foundry industry worldwide. Essential elements of CAD/CAM techniques will be covered. Numerical simulation of the filling and solidification in castings will be presented. Calculation of foundry processes with multiple production cycles will be analyzed. Another course feature will be the graphical presentation of the results on the screen. Limited enrolment.

Total AUs: 51.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 102.4 (Full Year)

MSE458H1 - Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems

MSE458H1 - Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The unique surface properties and the ability to surface engineer nanocrystalline structures renders these materials to be ideal candidates for use in corrosion, catalysis and energy conversion devices. This course deals with the fabrication of materials suitable for use as protective coatings, and their specific exploitation in fields of hydrogen technologies (electrolysis, storage, and fuel cells) linked to renewables. These new devices are poised to have major impacts on power generation utilities, the automotive sector, and society at large. The differences in observed electrochemical behavior between amorphous, nanocrystalline and polycrystalline solid materials will be discussed in terms of their surface structure and surface chemistry. A major team design project along with demonstrative laboratory exercises constitutes a major portion of this course. Limited Enrolment.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE459H1 - Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials

MSE459H1 - Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/26P

Various synthesis techniques to produce nanostructured materials will be introduced. These include methods involving the vapor phase (physical and chemical vapor deposition, organometallic chemical vapor deposition), the liquid phase (rapid solidification, spark erosion), the solid phase, (mechanical attrition, equal channel deformation) as well techniques producing these structures from solution (electrodeposition, electroless processing, precipitation). Secondary processing techniques to produce final products or devices will also be discussed.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE461H1 - Engineered Ceramics

MSE461H1 - Engineered Ceramics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/24T

The unique combinations of physical, electrical, magnetic, and thermomechanical properties exhibited by advanced technical ceramics has led to a wide range of applications including automobile exhaust sensors and fuel cells, high speed cutting tool inserts and ball bearings, thermal barrier coatings for turbine engines, and surgical implants. This course examines the crystal and defect structures which determine the electrical and mass transport behaviours and the effects of microstructure on optical, magnetic, dielectric, and thermomechanical properties. The influence of these structure-property relations on the performance of ceramic materials in specific applications such as sensors, solid oxide fuel cells, magnets, and structural components is explored.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE462H1 - Materials Physics II

MSE462H1 - Materials Physics II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

Electron quantum wave theory of solid-state materials will be introduced. Quantum phenomena in various materials systems, in particular nano materials, will be discussed. Electronic properties of materials such as charge transport, dielectric properties, optical properties, magnetic properties, and thermal properties will be discussed using appropriate quantum theory. Materials systems to be studied may include metals, semiconductors, organics, polymers, and insulators.

Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

MSE465H1 - Application of Artificial Intelligence in Materials Design

MSE465H1 - Application of Artificial Intelligence in Materials Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8P

In this course students will be exposed to the applications of machine learning for materials design, including physical metallurgy, catalysis and mechanics of materials. We will begin by conducting a review of statistical and numerical methods, and programming in R and Python. Then, the most important machine learning techniques of relevance to materials science will be described. This will include linear, nonlinear and logistic regression, decision trees, artificial neural networks, deep learning, supervised and unsupervised learning. Thereafter, the students will be provided hands-on experience on analyzing data and apply ML approaches through a set of case studies, pertaining to alloy design, additive manufacturing, and catalyst design. Finally, students will apply these skills through a term project on materials science problem of their interest.

Due to the broad nature of course topics, we encourage students from Chem Eng, MIE, Chemistry, and other departments.

Enrolment Limits: 30
Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

MSE467H1 - Multiscale Modeling of Materials Failure

MSE467H1 - Multiscale Modeling of Materials Failure
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8P

Understanding how different materials fail is a key design consideration in materials science. In this course students will be exposed to the mechanisms leading to the damage and failure of engineering materials, and modeling of failure at atomic and continuum levels. First, we will describe different mechanisms by which various materials fail, including metals, alloys, ceramics, composite materials, and nanomaterials; and the nature of failure – brittle vs. ductile. Then, various approaches to model and analyze damage and failure in materials will be discussed, including finite element-based failure analysis at the macroscale, and molecular dynamics at the atomic scale. Hands-on practice will be provided through practical case studies using softwares. Finally, students will apply these skills through a term project on a materials science problem of their interest.

Enrolment Limits: 25
Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

MSE468H1 - Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Engineering Materials

MSE468H1 - Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Engineering Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 17.5L/20P

The one-week intensive course includes additive manufacturing (AM) process fundamentals, material properties, design rules, qualification methods, cost and value analysis, and industrial and consumer applications of AM. Particular emphasis will be placed on AM technologies for metals and other advanced materials (ceramics and composites), and related design principles and part performance. The AM techniques introduced in this course include, but are not limited, to selective laser melting, direct metal deposition, wire arc deposition, cold spray, powder binder jetting, electroplating, fused deposition modeling (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA).

Lab activities (virtual / hands-on) involving both desktop and industrial-grade 3D printers for metals, ceramics and composites, addressing the full workflow from design to characterization. Several interactive case studies which deploy quantitative analysis tools discussed in lecture to solve a real or imagined market or business need. Virtual / in-person visits to local AM startups and an AM equipment provider/integrator. A multidisciplinary team of speakers including industry experts, and special guest speakers (some are U of T Alumni). This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of AM technology, its applications, and its implications both now and in the future.

Enrolment Limits: 10
Total AUs: 1.8 (Fall), 2 (Winter), 3.8 (Full Year)

MSE490H1 - Professional Ethics and Practice

MSE490H1 - Professional Ethics and Practice
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 25.6L

The various roles of a practicing engineer in industry and society will be presented through a series of seminars. The lecturers will include practicing engineers from local companies and consulting firms and representatives from professional and technical societies.

Total AUs: 23.6 (Fall), 25.6 (Winter), 49.2 (Full Year)

MSE492H1 - Research Thesis I

MSE492H1 - Research Thesis I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8T/51.2P

The course offers an opportunity to carry out an independent research under the supervision of an academic staff for the students interested in expanding their research capabilities. The students will submit a proposal in the beginning of the course that describes the problem and work plan together with an estimate of the level of effort (hours of work). The grading will be based on a final report and presentation, assessed by a minimum of two faculty members. Students may take this as a half-credit course in the F semester or complement it with the equivalent S semester course for a full credit, in the case of more extensive thesis projects in consultation with the supervising faulty.

Prerequisite: MSE398Y1
Total AUs: 0 (Fall), 0 (Winter), 0 (Full Year)

MSE493H1 - Research Thesis II

MSE493H1 - Research Thesis II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8T/51.2P

The course offers an opportunity to carry out an independent research under the supervision of an academic staff for the students interested in expanding their research capabilities. The students will submit a proposal in the beginning of the course that describes the problem and work plan together with an estimate of the level of effort (hours of work). The grading will be based on a final report and presentation, assessed by a minimum of two faculty members. Students may take this as a half-credit course in the S semester or complement it with the equivalent F semester course for a full credit, in the case of more extensive thesis projects, in consultation with the supervising faulty.

Prerequisite: MSE398Y1
Total AUs: 0 (Fall), 0 (Winter), 0 (Full Year)

MSE498Y1 - Capstone Project: Design of Materials Processes

MSE498Y1 - Capstone Project: Design of Materials Processes
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8L/25.6T/12.8P

The students, working in small groups complete a project involving design of a materials processing plant, leading to a design report delivered at the conclusion of the course. The topics covered in the lectures and design process include basic materials processing flowsheet for primary processing and recycling of materials, materials and energy balance of individual units and of overall process flowsheets, use of computer software for flowsheet evaluation, translating process flowsheets to resource and utility requirements, energy analysis, capital/operating cost, basics of equipment sizing, operation scheduling, safety and HAZOP, plant layout, and design for sustainability.

Exclusion: CHM499Y1
Total AUs: 94.4 (Fall), 102.4 (Winter), 196.8 (Full Year)

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