Engineering Minors


Assistant Director
Sharon Brown
416-978-3532
s.brown@utoronto.ca

Program Assistant
Donna Lee
416-978-7890
engineering.minors@utoronto.ca

Cross-Disciplinary Programs Office
44 St. George St.
www.minors.engineering.utoronto.ca  

Engineering Minors

Students wishing to pursue an Engineering minor must take a minimum of six courses.

Completion of an Engineering Minor is subject to the following constraints:

  1. Students must ensure they meet the requirements of their chosen engineering-degree program or Major therein;
  2. Of the 6 (half-year) courses required for the minor, one (half-year) course can also be a core course in a student’s Program or Major, if applicable;
  3. No course that is counted for degree credit can be counted towards more than one minor or certificate;
  4. In some minor programs where indicated, either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to two (half year) electives towards the elective requirements IF the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to the subject area of the minor. This requires approval of the Director of the Minor;
  5. Availability of the courses to complete an engineering minor (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable;
  6. Students must secure approval from their home department before selecting any elective outside their home department.

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING MINOR - UOFT SUSTAINABILITY SCHOLAR (AEMINENV)

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING MINOR - UOFT SUSTAINABILITY SCHOLAR (AEMINENV)

Environmental Engineering Minor (U of T Sustainability Scholar)

Students interested in learning more about ecology, sustainable design, risk assessment and environmental impact may be interested in this minor. Our definition of environmental engineering is broad, reaching to all areas at the interface of engineering and the environment. This includes ecology and ecological impacts, waste management, water and wastewater treatment, environmental microbiology, water resources engineering, hydrology, preventive engineering, life cycle analysis, design for the environment, and extends to the social and environmental impacts of technology.

Students who complete the requirements of the Environmental Engineering Minor are considered University of Toronto Sustainability Scholars.

All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible to participate in this minor course of study.

Course Requirements for the Minor in Environmental Engineering

The requirements for an Environmental Engineering Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses.

  1. One (1) courses from the following:
    1. CME259H1
    2. ESC203H1
    3. ENV221H1
    4. GGR223H1
  2. One (1) courses from the following:
    1. CIV220H1
    2. CIV440H1
    3. CHE460H1
    4. CHE467H1
  3. Four (4) other electives from the list of Environmental Engineering designated courses or departmental thesis and design courses subject to the following constraints:
    1. Of the 6 half year environmental engineering courses required, one half year course can also be a core course in a student’s Program, if applicable.
    2. Of the 4 elective courses, at least 2 must be from the Advanced category.
    3. Either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to 2 half year electives towards the 6 required courses if the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to environmental engineering. This requires approval by the Environmental Engineering Minor Director.
    4. Some Departments may require students to select their electives from a pre-approved subset. Please contact your Departmental Advisor for details.
    5. Faculty of Arts and Science courses listed below may be considered eligible electives for students taking the Environmental Engineering Minor, subject to the student meeting any prerequisite requirements. Students must also seek the approval of their home program to ensure that they meet their degree requirements. In situations where these courses don't meet those of their home program, students can elect to take these as extra courses.
Courses Offered in the Fall   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses          
CHE467H1: Environmental Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
CIV220H1: Urban Engineering Ecology F 3 - 1 0.50
CME259H1: Technology in Society and the Biosphere I F 3 - 1 0.50
ENV221H1: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Environment F - - - 0.50
ESC203H1: Engineering and Society F 2 - 2 0.50
Introductory Courses          
CHM210H1: Chemistry of Environmental Change F 2 - 1 0.50
CIV300H1: Terrestrial Energy Systems F 3 - 2 0.50
CIV375H1: Building Science F 3 0.33 2 0.50
ENV234H1: Environmental Biology-Structure & Function of Ecosystems F - - - 0.50
ENV350H1: Energy Policy & Environment F - - - 0.50
FOR308H1: Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development F 3 - 1 0.50
Advanced Courses          
CHE565H1: Aqueous Process Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
CIV531H1: Transport Planning F 3 - 1 0.50
CIV536H1: Urban Activity, Air Pollution, and Health F 3 - - 0.50
CIV541H1: Environmental Biotechnology F 3 - - 0.50
CIV550H1: Water Resources Engineering F 3 - 2 0.50
CIV575H1: Studies in Building Science F 3 - 2 0.50
CIV578H1: Design of Building Enclosures F 3 - 2 0.50
CME549H1: Groundwater Flow and Contamination F 3 - 1 0.50
FOR421H1: Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City Forests F 2 - - 0.50
MIE515H1: Alternative Energy Systems F 3 - 1 0.50
MIN511H1: Integrated Mine Waste Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
MSE415H1: Environmental Degradation of Materials F 3 - 1 0.50

Courses Offered in the Winter   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses          
CHE460H1: Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment S 3 - 2 0.50
CIV440H1: Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment S 3 - 1 0.50
GGR223H1 (formerly GGR222H1): Environment, Society, and Resources S 2 - 1 0.50
Introductory Courses          
APS330H1: Interdisciplinary Stuides for Sustainability & Innovation S 3 - - 0.5
CHE230H1: Environmental Chemistry S 3 - 2 0.50
CHM310H1: Environmental Fate and Toxicity of Organic Contaminants S 2 - - 0.50
CIV250H1: Hydraulics and Hydrology S 3 1.50 1 0.50
CIV300H1: Terrestrial Energy Systems S 3 - 2 0.50
ENV222H1: Pathways to Sustainability-An Interdisciplinary Approach S - - - 0.50
GGR314H1: Global Warming S 3 - - 0.50
MIE315H1: Design for the Environment S 3 - 1 0.50
Advanced Courses          
APS530H1: Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development S 3 - - 0.50
CHE471H1: Modelling in Biological and Chemical Systems S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE475H1: Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE564H1: Pulp and Paper Processes S 3 - 1 0.50
CHM410H1: Analytical Environmental Chemistry S 2 4 - 0.50
CHM415H1: Topics in Atmospheric Chemistry S 2 - - 0.50
CIV576H1: Sustainable Buildings S 3 - 0 0.50
CIV577H1: Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities S 3 - 1 0.50
CME500H1: Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage S 3 2 1 0.50
FOR424H1: Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials S 2 - 1 0.50
MIN330H1: Mining Environmental Management S 3 - 1 0.50
APS420H1: Technology, Engineering and Global Development S 3 - - 0.50

MINOR IN ADVANCED MANUFACTURING (AEMINADVM)

MINOR IN ADVANCED MANUFACTURING (AEMINADVM)

Manufacturing is the most intensive research and development economic sector in Canada, accounting for 75 per cent of all private sector research expenditures. The courses in this minor draw on an array of engineering skills, leadership and multi-disciplinary knowledge, all of which can be leveraged in a wide range of sectors, including biomedical, automotive, aviation, aerospace, energy and others. The minor provides a strong foundation in advanced manufacturing which can lead to a career in industry or graduate degrees.

The requirements for the Minor in Advanced Manufacturing in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

  1. Choose one (1) of the following foundational courses:
    1. CHE324H1: Process Design
    2. MIE221H1: Manufacturing Engineering
    3. MIE304H1: Introduction to Quality Control
    4. MIE364H1: Methods of Quality Control and Improvement
    5. MSE351H1: Design and Simulation of Materials Processes
  2. MIE519H1: Advanced Manufacturing Technologies
  3. Choose one of the following business management/leadership courses:
    1. TEP343H1: Engineering Leadership
    2. TEP442H1: Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership
    3. CHE488H1/CIV488H1/ECE488H1/MIE488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
    4. JRE420H1: People Management and Organizational Behaviour
  4. Three (3) other electives from the list of designated courses below or departmental thesis and design courses subject to the following constraints:
    1. Of the 6 half year courses required for the minor, only one half year course can be a core course in the student’s degree program, including courses listed in requirement #1.
    2. Of the 3 elective courses, at least 2 must be from the Advanced category.
    3. Either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to two half year Advanced elective courses towards the 4 elective courses IF the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to advanced manufacturing. This requires approval by the Advanced Manufacturing Minor Director.
    4. Some Departments may require students select their electives from a pre-approved subset. Please contact your Departmental Advisor for details.
Introductory Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE441H1: Engineering Materials F 3 - 1 0.50
MIE243H1: Mechanical Engineering Design F 3 2 2 0.50
MIE304H1: Introduction to Quality Control S 3 1 2 0.50
MIE342H1: Circuits with Applications to Mechanical Engineering Systems F 3 1.50 1 0.50
MIE354H1: Business Process Engineering F 3 2 - 0.50

Advanced Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
AER525H1: Robotics F 3 1.50 1 0.50
CHE462H1: Food Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE562H1: Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering F 3 - - 0.50
CHE475H1: Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE561H1: Risk Based Safety Management S 3 - 1 0.50
ECE470H1: Robot Modeling and Control F/S 3 1.50 1 0.50
FOR424H1: Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials S 2 - 1 0.50
MIE368H1: Analytics in Action F 3 2 - 0.50
MIE410H1: *Finite Element Analysis in Engineering Design F 2 2 - 0.50
MIE422H1: Automated Manufacturing F 2 3 - 0.50
MIE440H1: * Design of Innovative Products F 2 2 1 0.50
MIE441H1: * Design Optimization S 3 2 - 0.50
MIE443H1: * Mechatronics Systems: Design and Integration S 2 5 - 0.50
MIE469H1: Reliability and Maintainability Engineering S 3 - 2 0.50
MIE540H1: * Product Design S 3 - 1 0.50
MIE562H1: Scheduling F 3 - 2 0.50
MIE566H1: Decision Making Under Uncertainty F 3 - 2 0.50
MSE419H1: Fracture and Failure Analysis F 3 - 1 0.50
MSE431H1: Forensic Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
MSE438H1: Computational Materials Design F 3 1 - 0.50
MSE443H1: Composite Materials Engineering F 3 - - 0.50
MSE455H1: Process Simulation and Computer Design S 3 - 2 0.50
MSE461H1: Engineered Ceramics F 3 - 2 0.50
Thesis or Design Project courses with approval of the Director of the Minor          

MINOR IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ENGINEERING (AEMINAIEN)

MINOR IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ENGINEERING (AEMINAIEN)

Artificial intelligence (AI) and Machine learning (ML) have exploded in importance in recent years and garnered attention in a wide variety of application areas, including computer vision (e.g., image recognition), game playing (e.g., AlphaGo), autonomous driving, speech recognition, customer preference elicitation, bioinformatics (e.g., gene analysis) and others. While the topics may appear primarily to reside in the disciplines of computer engineering and computer science, the topics of AI and ML now apply to all disciplines of engineering, such as projection of future road-traffic patterns, applications in industrial automation and robotic control, or the use of AI/ML drug discovery, to name just a few examples.

All U of T Engineering undergraduates (except students in the Engineering Science Machine Learning Major) are eligible to participate in this minor. Note that Engineering Science students in the Robotics Major will have to take additional courses due to the number of core courses that overlap with their degree program.

The requirements for the Minor in Artificial Intelligence Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

Required Courses

Fall Session - Year 1   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Required:          
APS360H1: Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning F/S 3 - 1 0.5
One of:          
CSC263H1: Data Structures and Analysis F/S 2 - 1 0.5
ECE345H1: Algorithms and Data Structures F/S 3 - 2 0.5
ECE358H1: Foundations of Computing F 3 - 1 0.5
MIE245H1: Data Structures and Algorithms S 3 1 1 0.5
One of:          
CSC384H1: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence F/S 2 - 1 0.5
MIE369H1: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence S 3 - 2 0.5
ROB311H1: Artificial Intelligence S 3 - 1 0.5
One of:          
CSC311H1: Introduction to Machine Learning F/S 2 - 1 0.5
ECE421H1: Introduction to Machine Learning S 3 - 2 0.5
MIE424H1: Optimization in Machine Learning S 3 1 - 0.5
ROB313H1: Introduction to Learning from Data S 3 - 2 0.5
One or two of:   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE408H1: Data Analytics for Prediction, Control and Optimization of Chemical Processes   3 1 - 0.5
CHE507H1: Data-based Modelling for Prediction and Control S 3 - 1 0.5
CME538H1: Intro to Data Science for Civil and Mineral Engineering F 3 - 1 0.5
CSC401H1: Natural Language Computing F/S/Y 2 - 1 0.5
CSC420H1: Introduction to Image Understanding F 3 - - 0.5
CSC413H1: Neural Networks and Deep Learning S 2 - 1 0.5
CSC485H1: Computational Linguistics F/S 3 - - 0.5
CSC486H1: Knowledge Representation and Reasoning F/S/Y 2 - 1 0.5
ECE368H1: Probabilistic Reasoning S 3 - 1 0.5
HPS345H1: Quantifying the World & Epistemic Implications of AI F/S/Y 2 - - 0.5
HPS346H1: Modifying and Optimizing Life: AI, Biology & Engineering F/S/Y 2 - 1 0.5
MIE368H1: Analytics in Action F 2 3 1 0.5
MIE451H1: Decision Support Systems F 3 1 1 0.5
MIE457H1: Knowledge Modelling and Management S 3 1 1 0.5
MIE562H1: Scheduling S 3 - 2 0.5
MIE566H1: Decision Making Under Uncertainty F 3 - 2 0.5
MIE567H1: Dynamic & Distributed Decision Making S 3 - 2 0.5
MIE524H1: Data Mining F 3 2 - 0.5
MSE403H1: Data Sciences and Analytics for Materials Engineers S 3 2 - 0.5
MSE465H1: Application of Artificial Intelligence in Materials Design F 2 1 - 0.5
ROB501H1: Computer Vision for Robotics F 3 - 1 0.5
AI/ML-related capstone or thesis with Director's approval F/S/Y       0

As needed to bring credit weight to 3.0:   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
AER336H1: Scientific Computing S 3 - 1 0.5
BME595H1: Medical Imaging F 2 3 1 0.5
CHE322H1: Process Control S 3 - 1 0.5
CSC343H1: Introduction to Databases F/S 2 - 1 0.5
CSC412H1: Probabilistic Learning and Reasoning F/S 3 - - 0.5
ECE344H1: Operating Systems F/S 3 3 - 0.5
ECE353H1: Systems Software S 3 3 - 0.5
ECE356H1: Introduction to Control Theory S 3 1.5 1 0.5
ECE367H1: Matrix Algebra and Optimization F 3 - 2 0.5
ECE411H1: Adaptive Control and Reinforcement Learning S 3 1.5 1 0.5
ECE419H1: Distributed Systems S 3 1.5 1 0.5
ECE431H1: Digital Signal Processing F 3 1.5 1 0.5
ECE444H1: Software Engineering F 3 1.5 1 0.5
ECE454H1: Computer Systems Programming F 3 3 - 0.5
ECE470H1: Robot Modeling and Control F/S 3 1.5 1 0.5
ECE516H1: Intelligent Image Processing S 3 3 - 0.5
ECE532H1: Digital Systems Design S 3 3 - 0.5
ECE557H1: Linear Control Theory F 3 1.5 1 0.5
ECE568H1: Computer Security F/S 3 3 - 0.5
MAT336H1: Elements of Analysis F/S 2 - 1 0.5
MAT389H1: Complex Analysis F 3 - 1 0.5
STA302H1: Methods of Data Analysis I F/S 3 - - 0.5
STA410H1: Statistical Computation F 3 - - 0.5

NOTE:

  1. Robotics Major students in Engineering Science will only be able to access the Minor with the permission of the Cross-Disciplinary Programs Office. The permission will be based on the selection of a suitable set of alternative courses.
  2. ROB313H1 and ROB501H1 may be only used towards the Minor by Engineering Science students.
  3. Either a thesis or design course may count for up to two electives IF the thesis or design course is strongly related to artificial intelligence. This requires approval by the Director of the Minor.

MINOR IN BIOENGINEERING (AEMINBIO)

MINOR IN BIOENGINEERING (AEMINBIO)

New requirements effective May 1, 2022.

The Undergraduate Bioengineering Minor is a collaborative effort across the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and is open to engineering students interested in learning more about biology and its breadth of application to engineering. Our definition of bioengineering is broad, reaching to all areas at the interface of engineering and biology. The minor provides in-depth knowledge from molecular and cell scale engineering, manufacturing of biosystems and devices, to translation of technologies ranging from sustainable energy and renewable bioproducts to patient care. All undergraduate engineering students except students in Engineering Science’s Biomedical Systems Engineering major are eligible to participate in this minor course of study.


Further information on the minor can be found at www.minors.engineering.utoronto.ca.


Requirements for the Minor in Bioengineering

The requirements for a Bioengineering Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:


  1. CHE353H1 OR BME205H1** (0.5 FCE)

  1. Choose at least 1 course (0.5 FCE):
    1. BME412H1, recommended for Biomedical Engineering pathway
    2. BME455H1, recommended for both pathways
    3. BME331H1, recommended for Biomedical Engineering pathway
    4. CHE354H1, recommended for Bioprocess Engineering pathway

Although students are required to only complete 1 out of the 4 courses listed above, it is highly recommended to complete 2 of the above courses if scheduling permits.


  1. Choose at least 1 course (0.5 FCE):
    1. BME498Y1 *
    2. Departmental Thesis (requires approval of Minor Director from BME (Biomedical pathway) or CHE (Bioprocess Pathway))#
    3. BME440H1
    4. CHE450H1

  1. Choose up to three electives as needed to bring the total to 3.0 FCE.

Students may choose any of the below courses but those wishing to concentrate on a particular pathway are recommended to choose courses that fit within that category.


Biomedical Engineering pathway:

Courses relevant to the Biomedical Engineering pathway are further grouped into three themes: Molecular engineering, Cell and Tissue Engineering and Clinical Engineering:


  1. Molecular theme: BME412H1, BME440H1, BME595H1, CHE475H1, ECE448H1, MSE343H1, MSE440H1
  2. Cell & Tissue theme: BME350H1, BME395H1, BME455H1, MIE439H1, MIE458H1, MIE520H1
  3. Clinical theme: BME330H1, BME331H1, BME445H1, BME530H1, ECE446H1, ECE441H1

Bioprocess Engineering pathway:

Courses relevant to the Bioprocess Engineering pathway are further grouped into two themes: Biomolecular and microbial engineering, and Biomanufacturing:


  1. Biomolecular and Microbial engineering theme: CHE354H1, ECE448H1, MGY441H1, CHE471H1, BCB420H1
  2. Biomanufacturing pathway theme: CHE354H1, BME330H1, CHE450H1, CHE462H1, CHE475H1, CHE471H1, CHE564H1, CIV342H1, CIV541H1, MGY377H1, MSE343H1, MIE520H1

Additional elective courses: CHE416H1, CHM456H1, ECE331H1, ECE335H1, ECE431H1, ECE516H1, FOR308H1, FOR421H1, FOR424H1, FOR425H1, HMB201H1, HMB265H1, HPS318H1, HPS319H1, IMM250H1, MIE242H1, MIE343H1, MIE523H1, MIE561H1, PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PHL281H1, PSL300H1


**BME205 is only available for enrollment for Engineering Science students.

* Students wishing to register in BME498Y1Y must obtain approval from the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate & Graduate Student Office. Some departments have agreed to accept BME498Y1Y in place of their program’s capstone course (existing agreement for ECE, MSE, MECH).

#Students who wish to count their departmental thesis or capstone design project towards the Bioengineering minor must submit their request to the Cross-Disciplinary Programs Office (engineering.minors@utoronto.ca

   

Lect.

Lab.

Tut.

Wgt.

One of:

         

CHE353H1: Engineering Biology

F

2

-

2

0.50

BME205H1: Fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering

S

2

1.50

1

0.50

At least one of:

         

BME331H1: Physiological Control Systems

S

3

1

1

0.50

BME412H1: Introduction to Biomolecular Engineering

F

       

BME455H1: Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering II

F

3

1.50

1

0.50

CHE354H1: Cellular and Molecular Biology

S

3

1

2

0.50

At least one of:

         

BME440H1: Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation

S

2

4

-

0.50

BME498Y1: Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design

Y

       

CHE450H1: Bioprocess Technology and Design

F

3

0.66

1

0.50

Bioengineering-related capstone or thesis with Director's approval

F/S/Y

     

0.5 or 1.0

As needed to bring credit weight to 3.0:

         

BME330H1: Patents in Biology and Medical Devices

S

3

-

-

0.50

BME350H1: Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ Systems

F

3

1

2

0.50

BME395H1: Biomedical Systems Engineering II: Cells and Tissues

F

2

1

2

0.50

BME445H1: Neural Bioelectricity

F

3

1.50

1

0.50

BME530H1: Whole-Body Mechanics

S

3

2

-

0.50

BME595H1: Medical Imaging

F

2

3

1

0.50

CHE416H1: Chemical Engineering in Human Health

S

3

-

-

0.50

CHE450H1: Bioprocess Technology and Design

F

       

CHE462H1: Food Engineering

S

3

-

1

0.50

CHE471H1: Modelling in Biological and Chemical Systems

S

3

-

1

0.50

CHE475H1: Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration

S

3

-

1

0.50

CHE564H1: Pulp and Paper Processes

S

3

-

1

0.50

CIV342H1: Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes

F

3

1

1

0.50

CIV541H1: Environmental Biotechnology

S

3

-

-

0.50

ECE331H1: Analog Electronics

F

3

1.5

1

0.50

ECE335H1: Introduction to Electronic Devices

F

3

-

2

0.50

ECE431H1: Digital Signal Processing

F

3

1.5

1

0.50

ECE441H1: Interfacing & Modulating the Nervous System

S

3

1.5

1

0.50

ECE446H1: Sensory Communication

F

3

1.50

-

0.50

ECE448H1: Biocomputation

S

3

-

2

0.50

ECE516H1: Intelligent Imaging Processing

F

3

3

-

0.50

FOR308H1: Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development

F

3

-

1

0.50

FOR421H1: Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City Forests

F

2

-

-

0.50

FOR424H1: Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials

S

2

-

1

0.50

FOR425H1: Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology

S

2

-

2

0.50

MIE242H1: Psychology For Engineers

F

3

3

-

0.50

MIE343H1: Industrial Ergonomics and the Workplace

F

3

3

-

0.50

MIE439H1: Cell and Tissue Mechanics

F

3

2

-

0.50

MIE458H1: Biofluid Mechanics

F

3

-

1

0.50

MIE520H1: Biotransport Phenomena

F

3

-

1

0.50

MIE523H1: Engineering Psychology and Human Performance

F

3

3

-

0.50

MIE561H1: Healthcare Systems

S

3

-

2

0.50

MSE343H1: Biomaterials

F

3

-

1

0.50

MSE440H1: Biomaterial Processing and Properties

F

       

BCB420H1: Computational Systems Biology

S

2

-

2

0.50

MGY441H1: Bioinfomatics

F

2

-

1

0.50

CHM456H1: Organic Materials Chemistry

S

2

-

-

0.50

HMB201H1: Introduction to Fundamental Genetics and its Applications

S

2

-

1

0.50

HMB265H1: General & Human Genetics

F

2

-

1

0.50

HPS318H1: History of Medicine I

         

HPS319H1: History of Medicine II

S

-

-

-

0.50

IMM250H1: The Immune System & Infectious Disease

S

-

-

-

0.50

MGY377H1: Microbiology I: Bacteria

F

3

-

-

0.50

PCL201H1: Introduction to Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetic Principles

S

3

-

1

0.50

PCL302H1: Introduction to Pharmacology: Pharmadynamic Principles

         

PHL281H1 (formerly PHL281Y1): Bioethics

S

-

-

-

0.50

PSL300H1: Human Physiology I

F

3

-

1

0.50


NOTE:

  1. BME205H1, BME350H1 and BME395H1 are only open to Engineering Science Students.

MINOR IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING - Closed to new enrolments effective May 1, 2022 (AEMINBME)

MINOR IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING - Closed to new enrolments effective May 1, 2022 (AEMINBME)

This minor program will no longer be accepting enrolments effective May 1, 2022. Only students who are enrolled in the Biomedical Engineering Minor before April 30, 2022, will be permitted to complete the requirements below.

This highly focused minor examines engineering's intersection with medical research and biomedical technology. Courses provide training in physiological control systems, bioinstrumentation, biomechanics and a choice of lab or design experience. All Engineering undergraduates starting from Year 1 through to degree completion are eligible to pursue the Biomedical Engineering Minor, with the exception of students in the Engineering Science Biomedical Systems Engineering Major.

The requirements for a Biomedical Engineering Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following:

  1. CHE353H1 - Engineering Biology
  2. BME331H1 - Physiological Control Systems
  3. BME440H1 - Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation
  4. One (1) of the following:
    1. MIE439H1 - Biomechanics
    2. BME530H1 - Human Whole Body Biomechanics
  5. BME498Y1 - Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design

Notes:

  • Entry into BME498Y1 requires permission from the IBBME Undergraduate and Graduate Office. Students should make this request when completing pre-registration, and no later than June 16.
  • A Biomedical Engineering Minor student may take both courses (BME499Y1, BME498Y1) but only one may count towards the minor.
  • A Biomedical Engineering Minor student may take both courses (BME430H1, MIE439H1) but only one may count towards the minor.
  • For those Engineering Science students who transferred into another program, BME205H1 can replace CHE353H1 and is an eligible pre-requisite for BME331H1.
Courses Offered in the Fall   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Courses to be taken in Year Three          
CHE353H1: Engineering Biology F 2 - 2 0.50
Courses to be taken in Year Four          
BME440H1: Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation F 2 4 - 0.50
MIE439H1: Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics F 3 2 - 0.50
One (1) of the following:          
BME498Y1: Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design Y 2 3 - 1.00

Courses Offered in the Winter   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Courses to be taken in Year Three          
BME331H1: Physiological Control Systems S 3 1 1 0.50
Courses to be taken in Year Four          
BME530H1: Human Whole Body Biomechanics S 3 2 - 0.50
One (1) of the following:          
BME498Y1: Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design Y 2 3 - 1.00

Notes:

The above is a recommendation of the scheduling of minor courses but may not fit into each departments academic scheduling for a student’s major. It is recommended that students wishing to complete the Biomedical Engineering Minor visit the IBBME Undergraduate and Graduate Programs Office (MB 332, undergrad.bme@utoronto.ca) for assistance or speak with their program advisor.

*Students from the department of Material Science Engineering cannot take both BME498Y1 and BME499Y1.

MINOR IN ENGINEERING BUSINESS (AEMINBUS)

MINOR IN ENGINEERING BUSINESS (AEMINBUS)

This minor is for students interested in learning more about the business dimension of engineering, from finance and economics to management and leadership. Courses reach to areas of wealth production and creation, accounting, research and development, management, economics and entrepreneurship, all within a global context.


Students in the Engineering Science Mathematics, Statistics and Finance Major are not eligible to take this minor.


Course Requirements for the Minor in Engineering Business

The requirements for an Engineering Business Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

  1. Required Departmental Engineering Economics Course: CHE249H1, CHE374H1, CME368H1, ECE472H1, MIE258H1
  2. JRE300H1 - CS Elective
  3. JRE410H1 - CS Elective
  4. JRE420H1 - HSS Elective
    1. Note - changed from CS as of Winter 2019, retroactive to Fall 2014
  5. Two (2) Course Electives from the list of Engineering Business designated courses. A Departmental Thesis course may be counted as 1 elective (if an H course) or 2 electives (if a Y course) if strongly related to Engineering Business. This requires approval of the Director of the Minor.
Courses offered in the Fall   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Engineering Economics Course (one of:)
         
CHE249H1: Engineering Economic Analysis F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE374H1: Economic Analysis and Decision Making F 3 - 1 0.50
CME368H1: Engineering Economics and Decision Making F 3 - 1 0.50
ECE472H1: Engineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship F 3 - 2 0.50
MIE258H1: Engineering Economics and Accounting F 3 - 1 0.50
Required Courses          
JRE300H1: Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance F/S 3 - 1 0.50
JRE410H1: Markets and Competitive Strategy F/S 2 2 - 0.50
JRE420H1: People Management and Organizational Behaviour F/S 3 - 1 0.50
Elective Courses          
APS500H1: Negotiations in an Engineering Context F 3 - - 0.50
APS502H1: Financial Engineering F - - 3 0.50
APS521H1: Building Organisations: An Engineer's Business Toolkit F 3 - - 0.50
ECE488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers F 3 - 2 0.50
ECO101H1: Principles of Microeconomics F - - - 0.50
FOR308H1: Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development F 3 - 1 0.50
MIE488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers F 3 - 2 0.50
MIE354H1: Business Process Engineering F 3 2 - 0.50
PHL295H1: Business Ethics F - - - 0.50
TEP234H1: Entrepreneurship and Small Business F 4 - 1 0.50
TEP343H1: Engineering Leadership F 1 2 - 0.50
TEP444H1: Positive Psychology for Engineers F 3 - - 0.50
TEP445H1: The Power of Story: Discovering Your Leadership Narrative F 2 - 1 0.50
APS510H1: Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems F 3 - 1 0.50

Courses offered in the Winter   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Engineering Economics Course          
ECE472H1: Engineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship S 3 - 2 0.50
Required Courses          
JRE300H1: Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance F/S 3 - 1 0.50
JRE410H1: Markets and Competitive Strategy F/S 2 2 - 0.50
JRE420H1: People Management and Organizational Behaviour F/S 3 - 1 0.50
Elective Courses          
APS420H1: Technology, Engineering and Global Development S 3 - - 0.50
APS511H1: Inventions and Patents for Engineers S 3 - - 0.50
CHE488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers S 3 - 2 0.50
CIV488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers S 3 - 2 0.50
ECO102H1: Principles of Macroeconomics S - - - 0.50
GGR251H1: Geography of Information S - - - 0.50
GGR252H1: Marketing Geography S 2 - 1 0.50
HPS283H1: The Engineer in History S 2 - 1 0.50
MIE540H1: * Product Design S 3 - 1 0.50
TEP343H1: Engineering Leadership S 1 2 - 0.50
TEP432H1: Entrepreneurship and Business Management S 4 - 1 0.50
TEP442H1: Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership S 3 - - 0.50
TEP447H1: The Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in Engineering S 3 - - 0.50
TEP448H1: System Mapping S 2 - 2 0.50

MINOR IN ENGINEERING MUSIC PERFORMANCE (AEMINMUSP)

MINOR IN ENGINEERING MUSIC PERFORMANCE (AEMINMUSP)

The Engineering Performance Minor was designed for Engineering undergraduates interested in exploring creativity in performance with music technology. This minor is open to any student completing an undergraduate degree in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.

Through our partnership with the Faculty of Music, we are able to provide access to a performance-based program, including courses normally only open to their students.

Due to the nature of these courses and the requirements set by the CEAB, there are courses within this minor that are only eligible for Free Elective (FE) or Extra course status (EXT). Thus students wishing to pursue this minor must be prepared to be taking on course work above and beyond their degree requirements. ECE446 and Technical courses from the Faculty of Music may be requested as Technical Elective Substitutions (TES) for a student's degree program, subject to the approval of the student's home department.

Note: Enrollment in the core course for the Minor, PMU299Y1 Y, will be based on a placement test, and may be competitive if demand exceeds the maximum number of placements. Minimum playing level required is RCM Gr. 8, plus background in theory and rudiments (Rudiments II or equivalent).

The requirements for a Music Performance Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

  1. PMU299Y1 - Applied Performance
  2. TMU130H1 - Music Theory 1
  3. ECE446H1- Sensory Communication
  4. Two other electives (1.0 FCE) from the list of designated courses or departmental thesis and design courses subject to the following constraints:
    a. At least one elective (0.5 FCE) must come from the Technical (T) category
    b. Either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to two (half year) courses towards the 2 elective courses IF the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to music. This requires approval by the Minor Director.
    c. Courses listed below may be considered eligible electives for students taking the Music Minor, subject to the student meeting any prerequisite requirements. Students must also seek the approval of their home program to ensure that they meet their degree requirements. In situations where these courses don't meet those of their home program, students can elect to take these as extra courses.
Core Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
ECE446H1: Sensory Communication F 3 1.50 1. 0.50
PMU299Y1: Applied Performance Y 1 - - 1.00
TMU130H1: Music Theory 1 F 3 - - 0.50
One (1) Technical Elective          
TMU111H1: Introduction to Computer Applications in Music F/S - - - 0.50
TMU313H1: Introduction to Music Recording F/S - - - 0.50
TMU319H1: Electroacoustic Music I (Not offered in 2023-2024) F/S - - - 0.50
TMU330H1: Live Coding: Digital Audio in Real Time (Not offered in 2023-2024) F/S - - - 0.50
TMU406H1: Max/MSP F/S - - - 0.50
Music Related Thesis or Capstone F/S - - - 0.50
Music Related Thesis or Capstone Y - - - 1.00

Elective Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
HMU111H1: Introduction to Music and Society F/S - - - 0.5
MUS110H1: Introduction to Music History and Culture F/S - - - 0.5
MUS111H1: Historical Survey of Western Music F/S - - - 0.5
MUS200H1: Music of the World's Peoples F/S - - - 0.5
MUS204H1: The Age of Bach and Handel F/S - - - 0.5
MUS209H1: Performing Arts of South Asia F/S - - - 0.5
MUS211H1: The World of Popular Music F/S - - - 0.5
MUS212H1: Music, Sound & Power in the Middle East F/S - - - 0.5
MUS240H1: Heavy Music F/S - - - 0.5
MUS302H1: Symphony F/S - - - 0.5
MUS306H1: Popular Music in North America F/S - - - 0.5
MUS308H1: Handel F/S - - - 0.5
MUS335H1: A Social History of the Piano F/S - - - 0.5
TMU131H1: Music Theory 2 F/S - - - 0.5

Note: Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.

Note for Electives: The Faculty of Music updates the list of MUS courses offered each year. A final list of MUS electives eligible for the academic year will be posted on the Minors web site in May.

MINOR IN GLOBAL LEADERSHIP (AEMINGLOB)

MINOR IN GLOBAL LEADERSHIP (AEMINGLOB)

The FASE Minor in Global Leadership is part of U of T’s first tri-campus, interdivisional, multidisciplinary undergraduate program. The Minor is distinguished by its critical and multidisciplinary focus on leadership in a global context. This is combined with an emphasis on developing knowledge of global issues within an engineering framework and how engineers can influence and improve conditions around the world. All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible to participate in this minor course of study, however enrollment is limited. This minor consists of 4.0 FCE, similar to minors from the Faculty of Arts & Science.

Limited Enrolment — Enrolment in this program is limited. Students must follow the appropriate application procedures in the year preceding enrolment. The first application period will be in Spring 2023. A link to the application details will be available at www.minors.engineering.utoronto.ca.


The requirements for a Minor in Global Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of 4.0 credits from the following courses:


Required:

1) GLB201H5 Global Leadership: Past, Present, Futures (0.5 FCE)

2) GLBC01H3 Global Leadership: Theory, Research and Practice (0.5 FCE)

3) GLB401Y1 Global Leadership: Capstone Project (1.0 FCE)

4) Choose 2.0 FCE from the following elective courses, at least 1.0 FCE must come from List A:

List A

  • APS299Y0 Y - Summer Research Abroad (1.0 FCE)
  • APS510H1 F - Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems (0.5 FCE, CS)
  • APS420H1 S - Technology, Engineering and Global Development (0.5 FCE, HSS)
  • APS530H1 S - Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development (0.5 FCE)
  • Global Engineering themed capstone (APS490Y1, ECE496Y1, MIE490Y1, MIE491Y1, CIV498H1) as approved by the Director of the Centre for Global Engineering (1.0 FCE)

List B (all 0.5 FCE, HSS)

  • ANT204H1 - Social Cultural Anthropology and Global Issues
  • ENV333H1 - Ecological Worldviews
  • GGR112H1 - Geographies of Globalization, Development and Inequality
  • JGU216H1 - Urbanization & Global Change
  • POL201H1 - Politics of Development: Issues and Controversies
  • POL208H1 - Introduction to International Relations
  • CDN268H1 - Canada and Globalization

Required   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
GLB201H5: Global Leadership - Past, Present, Futures         0.50
GLBC01H3: Global Leadership - Theory, Research and Practice         0.50
GLB401Y1: GLB401Y1 Global Leadership - Capstone Project         1.00
Elective Courses          
Choose 2.0 FCE from the following elective courses, at least 1.0 FCE must come from List A:          
List A          
APS299Y0: Summer Research Abroad Y       1.00
APS420H1: Technology, Engineering and Global Development S       0.50
APS510H1: Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems F       0.50
APS530H1: Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development S       0.50

Global Engineering themed capstone (APS490Y1, ECE496Y1, MIE490Y1, MIE491Y1, CIV498H1) as approved by the Director of the Centre for Global Engineering (1.0 FCE)

         
List B          
ANT204H1: Social Cultural Anthropology & Global Issues S       0.50
ENV333H1: Ecological Worldviews F       0.50
GGR112H1: Geographies of Globalization, Development & Inequality S       0.50
JGU216H1: Urbanization & Global Change S       0.50
POL201H1: Politics of Development: Issues & Controversies F       0.50
POL208H1: Introduction to International Relations F/S       0.50
CDN268H1: Canada & Globalization S       0.50

MINOR IN NANOENGINEERING (AEMINNANO)

MINOR IN NANOENGINEERING (AEMINNANO)

Course Requirements for the Minor in Nanoengineering

Nanoengineering, and its underlying science and engineering skills, has now become embedded in academic and industrial sectors spanning the electronics industry, communications, sustainable and legacy energy, medical diagnostics and devices, micro electrical mechanical systems, and new materials for the automotive, aviation, and manufacturing sectors. The minor provides students with an understanding of both the structure and the application of nanomaterials and includes a range of electives connected to their core programs.

The requirements for the Minor in Nanoengineering in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of 3.0 FCE as outlined below:

  1. MSE219H1 – Structure and Characterization of Materials
  2. Thesis or Capstone Design course strongly related to nanoengineering. This requires approval by the Director of the Nanoengineering Minor. Thesis and capstone courses are not subject to the core course limit.
  3. Three (or four) other courses from the list of electives below. If the thesis or capstone project is only 0.5 FCE weight, students will require four electives.
    1. a. Of the courses required, one course (0.5 FCE) can also be a core course in a student’s Program, if applicable. Thesis and capstone are exempt from this limit.
    2. Of the 3 elective courses, at least 2 must be from the Advanced category.
    3. Some Departments may require students select their electives from a preapproved subset. Please contact your Departmental Advisor for details.
    4. Arts and Science Courses listed below may be considered eligible electives for students taking the Nanoengineering Minor, subject to the student meeting any prerequisite requirements. Students must also seek the approval of their home program to ensure that they meet their degree requirements. In situations where these courses don't meet those of their home program, students can elect to take these as extra courses.

Introductory Courses

Fall Session
  Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
ECE335H1: Introduction to Electronic Devices F 3 - 2 0.50
Winter Session
  Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
BME346H1: Biomedical Engineering Technologies S 2 4 - 0.50
ECE330H1: Quantum and Semiconductor Physics S 3 - 2 0.50
ECE350H1: Semiconductor Electronic Devices S 3 1.50 1 0.50
PHY358H1: Atoms, Molecules and Solids S 2 - 1 0.50

Advanced Courses

Fall Session   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE562H1: Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering F 3 - - 0.50
CHM338H1: Intermediate Organic Chemistry F - - - 0.50
ECE427H1: Photonic Devices F 3 - 2 0.50
MSE430H1: Electronic Materials F 2 - 1 0.50
MSE438H1: Computational Materials Design F 3 1 - 0.50
MSE443H1: Composite Materials Engineering F 3 - - 0.50
MSE459H1: Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials F 3 2 - 0.50
PHY427H1: Advanced Physics Laboratory F - 6 - 0.50
PHY456H1: Quantum Mechanics II F 2 - 1 0.50
PHY485H1: Laser Physics F 2 - - 0.50
PHY487H1: Condensed Matter Physics F 2 - - 0.50
Winter Session
  Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
BME440H1: Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation S 2 4 - 0.50  
CHE475H1: Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration S 3 - 1 0.50
CHM328H1: Modern Physical Chemistry S - - - 0.50
FOR424H1: Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials S 2 - 1 0.50
MSE462H1: Materials Physics II S 2 - 1 0.50
MSE458H1: Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems S 3 - 2 0.50
MIE506H1: * MEMS Design and Microfabrication S 3 1.50 1 0.50
MIE517H1: Fuel Cell Systems S 3 - 1 0.50
PHY427H1: Advanced Physics Laboratory S - 6 - 0.50
PHY450H1: Relativistic Electrodynamics S 2 - 1 0.50
PHY452H1: Statistical Mechanics S 2 - - 0.50

MINOR IN ROBOTICS AND MECHATRONICS (AEMINRAM)

MINOR IN ROBOTICS AND MECHATRONICS (AEMINRAM)

The Minor in Robotics and Mechatronics is a collaborative effort among The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, the Institute for Aerospace Studies, and the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering. The minor in robotics and mechatronics exposes students to the fundamental paradigms, the enabling technologies, the design, and the applications of robotics and mechatronics. The program is intended to give a comprehensive view to these fields by drawing together relevant courses from all of the engineering departments. The emphasis is on giving the student a systems view rather than a narrowly focused study of one area. Courses examine the areas of sensing and actuation, control and signal processing, computer vision, intelligent algorithms, computation, and system integration. The minor prepares students for careers in industries that have a growing investment in automation, autonomy, and intelligent systems. It is open to all students in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering except those in the Engineering Science Robotics Major.

Requirements for the Minor in Robotics and Mechatronics

The requirements for a Robotics and Mechatronics Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

  1. One of:
    1. CHE322H1
    2. ECE311H1
    3. ECE356H1
    4. MIE404H1
    5. AER372H1
    6. BME344H1
  2. One of:
    1. AER525H1
    2. ECE470H1
    3. MIE422H1
    4. MIE443H1
    5. MIE444H1
  3. Four (4) other electives from the list of robotics and mechatronics-designated courses or a departmental thesis or design course subject to the following constraints:
    1. Of the 6 half year courses required, one (half year) course can also be a core course in a student's Program, if applicable.
    2. Of the four elective courses, at least two must be from the Advanced category.
    3. A thesis or capstone design course can count for up to two electives (2 HCEs) toward the four elective courses if the thesis is strongly related to robotics or mechatronics. This requires approval by the Director of the Minor.
    4. Of the six Minor courses required, not all can have the same course prefix.

Introductory Courses
Fall Courses Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
AER301H1: Dynamics F 3 - 1 0.50
APS360H1: Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning F 3 - 1 0.50
BME350H1: Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ Systems F 3 1 2 0.50
CSC263H1: Data Structures and Analysis F 2 - 1 0.50
ECE316H1: Communication Systems F 3 1.50 1 0.50
ECE345H1: Algorithms and Data Structures F 3 - 2 0.50
MIE243H1: Mechanical Engineering Design F 3 2 2 0.50
MIE301H1: Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines F 3 3 2 0.50
ROB310H1: Mathematics for Robotics F 3 - 1 0.50
Winter Courses Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
APS360H1: Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning S 3 - 1 0.50
CSC263H1: Data Structures and Analysis S 2 - 1 0.50
ECE316H1: Communication Systems S 3 1.50 1 0.50
ECE345H1: Algorithms and Data Structures S 3 - 2 0.50
ECE353H1: Systems Software S 3 3 - 0.50
ECE358H1: Foundations of Computing S 3 - 1 0.50
ECE363H1: Communication Systems S 3 1.50 1 0.50
BME331H1: Physiological Control Systems S 3 1 1 0.50
MIE346H1: Analog and Digital Electronics for Mechatronics S 3 1.50 1 0.50
ROB311H1: Artificial Intelligence S 3 - 1 0.50
ROB313H1: Introduction to Learning from Data S 3 - 2 0.50

Advanced Courses
Fall Courses Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
AER407H1: Space Systems Design F - 3 - 0.50
CSC384H1: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence F 2 - 1 0.50
CSC311H1: Introduction to Machine Learning F 2 - 1 0.50
ECE410H1: Linear Control Systems F 3 1.50 1 0.50
ECE431H1: Digital Signal Processing F 3 1.50 1 0.50
BME445H1: Neural Bioelectricity F 3 1.50 1 0.50
ECE557H1: Linear Control Theory F 3 1.50 1 0.50
MIE442H1: Machine Design F 3 1.50 3 0.50
* MIE444H1: * Mechatronics Principles F 2 3 - 0.50
Winter Courses Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
ROB521H1: Mobile Robotics and Perception S 3 1.50 1 0.50
CHE507H1: Data-based Modelling for Prediction and Control S 3 - 1 0.50
CSC384H1: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence S 2 - 1 0.50
CSC428H1: Human-Computer Interaction S 2 - 1 0.50
ECE411H1: Adaptive Control and Reinforcement Learning S 3 1.50 1 0.50
ECE516H1: Intelligent Image Processing S 3 3 - 0.50
ECE421H1: Introduction to Machine Learning S 3 - 2 0.50
ECE532H1: Digital Systems Design S 3 3 - 0.50
MAT363H1: Geometry of Curves and Surfaces S 3 - - 0.50
MIE438H1: Microprocessors and Embedded Microcontrollers S 2 3 - 0.50
* MIE443H1: * Mechatronics Systems: Design and Integration S 2 5 - 0.50
MIE505H1: Micro/Nano Robotics S 3 3 - 0.50
* MIE506H1: * MEMS Design and Microfabrication S 3 1.50 1 0.50

NOTES:

  • Computer Science courses may have limited enrollment.
  • Courses requiring special approval must be approved by the undergraduate Associate Chair of the student’s home department.
  • Enrolment in ROB311H1 and ROB313H1 limited to Engineering Science students

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY MINOR - U OF T SUSTAINABILITY SCHOLAR (AEMINENR)

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY MINOR - U OF T SUSTAINABILITY SCHOLAR (AEMINENR)

Sustainable Energy Minor (U of T Sustainability Scholar)

This minor is for students interested in learning more about energy, its sustainable use, energy demand management, and the public policy context in which energy use and production is regulated.

Our courses reach all areas of energy use, production, distribution, transmission, storage, and development. This includes energy use and production for transportation, for space cooling and heating demands, and electrical production (from both alternative and conventional sources), energy distribution and storage, and extends to energy conservation, price, greenhouse gas production and control, and aspects of public policy.

Students who complete the requirements of the Sustainable Energy Minor are considered University of Toronto Sustainability Scholars.

Students in the Engineering Science Energy System Major are not allowed to take this minor.

Course Requirements for the Minor in Sustainable Energy

The requirements for a Sustainable Energy Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

  1. CIV300H1
  2. One of:
    1. APS305H1
    2. ENV350H1
  3. Four (4) other electives from the list of Sustainable Energy designated courses or departmental thesis and design courses subject to the following constraints:
    1. Of the 6 half year sustainable energy courses required, one half year course can also be a core course in a student’s Program, if applicable.
    2. Of the 4 elective courses, at least 2 must be from the Advanced category.
    3. Either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to 2 half year electives towards the 6 required courses if the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to sustainable energy. This requires approval by the Sustainable Energy Minor Director.
    4. Some Departments may require students to select their electives from a pre-approved subset. Please contact your Departmental Advisor for details.
    5. Faculty of Arts and Science courses listed below may be considered eligible electives for students taking the Sustainable Energy Minor, subject to the student meeting any prerequisite requirements. Students must also seek the approval of their home program to ensure that they meet their degree requirements. In situations where these courses don't meet those of their home program, students can elect to take these as extra courses.
Courses offered in the Fall   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses          
CIV300H1: Terrestrial Energy Systems F 3 - 2 0.50
ENV350H1: Energy Policy and Environment F - - - 0.50
Introductory Courses          
CME259H1: Technology in Society and the Biosphere I F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE260H1: Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer F 3 0.50 1 0.50
CHE323H1: Engineering Thermodynamics F 3 - 2 0.50
CHE467H1: Environmental Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
CIV375H1: Building Science F 3 0.33 2 0.50
ECE313H1: Energy Systems and Distributed Generation F 3 1.50 1 0.50
ECE314H1: Fundamentals of Electrical Energy Systems F 3 1.50 1 0.50
ECE349H1: Introduction to Energy Systems F 3 1.50 1 0.50
GGR347H1 (formerly JGE347H1): Efficient Use of Energy F 2 - 1 0.50
Advanced Courses          
AER507H1: Introduction to Fusion Energy F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE451H1: Petroleum Processing F 3 - - 0.50
CHE566H1: Elements of Nuclear Engineering F 3 - 2 0.50
CIV531H1: Transport Planning F 3 - 1 0.50
CIV501H1: Building Energy Performance Simulation F 2 2 - 0.50
ECE520H1: Power Electronics F 3 1.5 1 0.50
MIE407H1: Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design F 3 - 2 0.50
MIE507H1: Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Fundamentals F 3 - 2 0.50
MIE515H1: Alternative Energy Systems F 3 - 1 0.50
MIE516H1: Combustion and Fuels F 3 - 1 0.50
APS510H1: Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems F 3 - 1 0.50

Courses Offered in the Winter   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses          
CIV300H1: Terrestrial Energy Systems S 3 - 2 0.50
APS305H1: Energy Policy S 3 - 1 0.50
Introductory Courses          
CHE460H1: Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment S 3 - 2 0.50
CIV440H1: Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment S 3 - 1 0.50
FOR310H1: Bioenergy from Sustainable Forest Management S 2 - 1 0.50
GGR348H1 (formerly JGE348H1) S 2 - 1 0.50
MIE311H1: Thermal Energy Conversion S 3 3 - 0.50
MIE313H1: Heat and Mass Transfer S 3 1.50 2 0.50
MSE355H1: Materials Production S 3 - 1 0.50
JPE395H1 (formerly PHY395H1): Physics of the Earth S - - - 0.50
Advanced Courses          
APS530H1: Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development S 3 - - 0.50
CHE469H1: Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion Devices S 3 - 1 0.50
CHE568H1: Nuclear Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
CIV576H1: Sustainable Buildings S 3 - 0 0.50
CIV577H1: Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities S 3 - 1 0.50
ECE463H1: Electric Drives S 3 1.50 1 0.50
ECE526H1: Power System Protection and Automation S - - - 0.50
FOR425H1: Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology S 2 - 2 0.50
MIE408H1: * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors S 3 - 2 0.50
MIE517H1: Fuel Cell Systems S 3 - 1 0.50
MIE550H1: Advanced Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer S 3 - - 0.50
MSE458H1: Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems S 3 - 2 0.50

Self-Initiated Minors

Students may be eligible to receive acknowledgement of an Arts & Science minor upon completion of its associated course requirements within specific disciplines (political science, cinema studies, etc.). Information regarding minor requirements for each discipline may be found in the Arts and Science Calendar. A student must complete all requirements within nine calendar years of first registration, exclusive of mandatory absences from their program.

Students are advised that pursuing a self-initiated minor may extend their studies by a term or year in order to complete all program requirements.

Students must obtain documentation from the relevant department within the Faculty of Arts & Science so as to provide the Faculty with evidence that all requirements will have been completed. Successful completion will result in the annotation of the students’ transcripts as to the completion of the minor.

Students may use any of their HSS elective credits, any of their CS elective credits, any Free Electives credits and/or any two other courses (two half-course equivalents) towards their Arts & Science Minor. All other courses taken for the Minor designation must be taken as "Extra" courses.

Students who have IB, AP, GCE, FB or CAPE credits may apply to the U of T Engineering Registrar’s Office to have the Faculty of Arts & Science equivalent courses listed on their transcript as "Extra" courses; the course equivalencies are those in place at the time of first registration. These credits may be counted towards any Arts & Science degree designation and may be used as pre-requisites for any higher level course in the Faculty of Arts & Science.

Students wishing to pursue a Major or Specialist designation must apply to the Faculty of Arts & Science for admission for a second degree.

Note: In some disciplines, the Faculty of Arts & Science has found it necessary to restrict enrolment in upper-level courses to their own students. Students planning to pursue minors should consult the department concerned regarding the availability of courses.

Engineering Minors Courses

Aerospace Science and Engineering

AER301H1 - Dynamics

AER301H1 - Dynamics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Reference frames in relative translation and rotation, vector and matrix formulations. Dynamics of a single particle and of systems of particles. Lagrange's equations. D'Alembert's and Hamilton's principle. Orbital dynamics. Rigid body kinematics and dynamics, Lagrangian approach to vibrations of complex systems. Model analysis. Primary Reference: class notes. Reference Books: Greenwood, Principles of Dynamics; Goldstein, Classical Mechanics.

Prerequisite: AER210H1, MAT185H1 and PHY180H1
Exclusion: MIE301H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

AER336H1 - Scientific Computing

AER336H1 - Scientific Computing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Introduces numerical methods for scientific computation which are relevant to the solution of a wide range of engineering problems. Topics addressed include interpolation, integration, linear systems, least-squares fitting, nonlinear equations and optimization, initial value problems, and partial differential equations. The assignments require programming of numerical algorithms.

Prerequisite: ESC103H1 and MAT185H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

AER407H1 - Space Systems Design

AER407H1 - Space Systems Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4P

Introduction to the conceptual and preliminary design phases for a space system currently of interest in the Aerospace industry. A team of visiting engineers provide material on typical space systems design methodology and share their experiences working on current space initiatives through workshops and mock design reviews. Aspects of operations, systems, electrical, mechanical, software, and controls are covered. The class is divided into project teams to design a space system in response to a Request for Proposals (RFP) formulated by the industrial team. Emphasis is placed on standard top-down design practices and the tradeoffs which occur during the design process. Past projects include satellites such as Radarsat, interplanetary probes such as a solar sailer to Mars, a Mars surface rover and dextrous space robotic systems.

Prerequisite: AER301H1, AER372H1
Total AUs: 47.3 (Fall), 51.3 (Winter), 98.5 (Full Year)

AER507H1 - Introduction to Fusion Energy

AER507H1 - Introduction to Fusion Energy
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Nuclear reactions between light elements provide the energy source for the sun and stars. On earth, such reactions could form the basis of an essentially inexhaustible energy resource. In order for the fusion reactions to proceed at a rate suitable for the generation of electricity, the fuels (usually hydrogen) must be heated to temperatures near 100 million Kelvin. At these temperatures, the fuel will exist in the plasma state. This course will cover: (i) the basic physics of fusion, including reaction cross-sections, particle energy distributions, Lawson criterion and radiation balance, (ii) plasma properties including plasma waves, plasma transport, heating and stability, and (iii) fusion plasma confinement methods (magnetic and inertial). Topics will be related to current experimental research in the field.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

AER525H1 - Robotics

AER525H1 - Robotics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

The course addresses fundamentals of analytical robotics as well as design and control of industrial robots and their instrumentation. Topics include forward, inverse, and differential kinematics, screw representation, statics, inverse and forward dynamics, motion and force control of robot manipulators, actuation schemes, task-based and workspace design, mobile manipulation, and sensors and instrumentation in robotic systems. A series of experiments in the Robotics Laboratory will illustrate the course subjects.

Prerequisite: AER301H1 and AER372H1
Exclusion: ECE470H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

Applied Science and Engineering (Interdepartmental)

APS305H1 - Energy Policy

APS305H1 - Energy Policy
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Complimentary Studies Elective
Core Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor
Introduction to public policy including the role and interaction of technology and regulation, policy reinforcing/feedback cycles; procedures for legislation and policy setting at the municipal, provincial and federal levels; dimensions of energy policy; energy planning and forecasting including demand management and conservation incentives; policy institution, analysis, implementation, evaluation and evolution; Critical analyses of case studies of energy and associated environmental policies with respect to conservation and demand management for various utilities and sectors; policy derivatives for varied economic and social settings, developing countries and associated impacts.

Exclusion: ENV350H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

APS330H1 - Interdisciplinary Studies for Sustainability & Innovation: How to Change the World

APS330H1 - Interdisciplinary Studies for Sustainability & Innovation: How to Change the World
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 3L

This is an interdisciplinary and multi-university project-based course focused on positively impacting the complex sustainability challenges faced by real-world communities around the world. Throughout this course, students work in small (three to five person) interdisciplinary and multi-university teams in order to (1) identify and understand a well-defined sustainability (social and/or environmental) problem faced by a real-world community, and then (2) devise, design and propose an implementable idea for positively impacting that problem. During the course, students are provided with multiple facilitated and structured opportunities to: engage directly with local stakeholders from the community their team is focused on; receive mentorship from a global network of experienced sustainability and innovation experts; and collaborate with a diverse array of students from other disciplines and institutions working on similar sustainability problems with other communities around the world.

Prerequisite: Must have completed at least 10.0 FCE in their current engineering degree program prior to the start of the course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

APS360H1 - Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning

APS360H1 - Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

A basic introduction to the history, technology, programming and applications of the fast evolving field of deep learning. Topics to be covered may include neural networks, autoencoders/decoders, recurrent neural networks, natural language processing, and generative adversarial networks. Special attention will be paid to fairness and ethics issues surrounding machine learning. An applied approach will be taken, where students get hands-on exposure to the covered techniques through the use of state-of-the-art machine learning software frameworks.

Prerequisite: APS105H1/APS106H1/ESC180H1/CSC180H1; APS163/MAT187H1/ESC195H1; MAT185H1/MAT188H1
Recommended Preparation: CHE223H1/CME263H1/ECE302H1/MIE231H1/MIE236H1/MSE238H1/STA286H1/ECE286H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

APS420H1 - Technology, Engineering and Global Development

APS420H1 - Technology, Engineering and Global Development
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Humanities and Social Science Elective

The role of technology and engineering in global development is explored through a combination of lectures, readings, case studies, and analysis of key technologies, including energy, information and communications technologies, water and healthcare. Topics include a brief history and basic theories of international development and foreign aid, major government and non-government players, emerging alternative models (social entrepreneurship, microfinance, risk capital approaches), major and emerging players in social venture capital and philanthropy, the role of financial markets, environmental and resource considerations/sustainable development, technology diffusion models and appropriate technologies.

Exclusion: APS520H1, APS420H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

APS500H1 - Negotiations in an Engineering Context

APS500H1 - Negotiations in an Engineering Context
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Instruction of concepts, theories, and research but most importantly the practice of negotiation skills. The course will cover all kinds of negotiations scenarios that individuals might face in the course of their careers as Engineers; this could include a range of single-issue single-party negotiations to multi-party multi-issues negotiations.

Recommended Preparation: JRE420H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

APS502H1 - Financial Engineering

APS502H1 - Financial Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course will focus on capital budgeting, financial optimization, and project evaluation models and their solution techniques. In particular, linear, non-linear, and integer programming models and their solutions techniques will be studied. The course will give engineering students a background in modern capital budgeting and financial techniques that are relevant in practival engineering and commercial settings.

Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT187H1, MAT188H1, MIE236H1, MIE237H1, or equivalent.
Exclusion: MIE375H1
Total AUs: 17.7 (Fall), 19.2 (Winter), 36.9 (Full Year)

APS510H1 - Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems

APS510H1 - Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Complementary Studies elective

A broad range of global energy systems are presented including electricity generation, electricity end use, transportation and infrastructure. Discussions are based on two key trends: (a) the increasing ability to deploy technologies and engineering systems globally, and (b) innovative organizations, many driven by entrepreneurship (for profit and social) and entrepreneurial finance techniques. The course considers these types of innovations in the context of developed economies, rapidly developing economies such as India and China, and the developing world. The course will interweave a mix of industry examples and more in-depth case studies. The examples and cases are examined with various engineering, business and environmental sustainability analysis perspectives.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate economics course
Exclusion: APS310H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

APS511H1 - Inventions and Patents for Engineers

APS511H1 - Inventions and Patents for Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Teaches the process of preparing a patent application for an invention for engineers and scientists. Teaches methods to take an invention from conception to a level that a patent application can be filed on it. Describes how to write an invention disclosure. Describes how to prepare the background section, brief listing of figures, detailed description of the invention, independent and dependent claims, abstract, and artwork. Teaches use of patent search engines.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

APS521H1 - Building Organizations: An Engineer's Business Toolkit

APS521H1 - Building Organizations: An Engineer's Business Toolkit
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Develops simple, powerful tools and strategies for designing, starting, growing, managing, changing, fixing and evolving successful organisations in the engineering industry. It is highly practical, develops a model for analysing an organisation and then applies it in clear simple steps. The curriculum is designed for Engineers looking to lead organisations, commercialise product ideas or manage change in existing institutions.

Prerequisite: JRE300H1 - Foundations of Accounting and Finance JRE410H1 - Markets and Competitive Strategy
Enrolment Limits: 36
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

APS530H1 - Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development

APS530H1 - Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Engineering design within the context of global society, emphasizing the needs of users in order to support appropriate, sustainable technology. A design project will comprise the major component of the course work. The course will take the approach of "design for X". Students are expected to be familiar with design for functionality, safety, robustness, etc. This course will extend the students' understanding of design methodologies to design for "appropriateness in developing regions". Readings and discussions will explore the social, cultural, economic, educational, environmental and political contexts in which third world end users relate to technology. Students will then incorporate their deepened understanding of this context in their design project. The projects will be analyzed for functionality as well as appropriateness and sustainability in the third world context. Upon completion of the course, students should have a deeper appreciation of the meaning of appropriate technology in various international development sectors such as healthcare, water & sanitation, land management, energy, infrastructure, and communications in both urban and rural settings.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering

BME205H1 - Fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering

BME205H1 - Fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/19.2P

Introduction to connecting engineering and biological approaches to solve problems in medicine, science, and technology. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating the connection between organ level function with cellular mechanisms. Topics may include, but are not limited to: design principles of biological systems, medical devices, overviews of anatomy and physiology, and cellular mechanisms as they relate to biotechnological and medical technology applications. Laboratories will provide hands-on experiences with selected concepts and encourage students to understand how to connect their own vital and physiologic signs to current medical technologies.

Exclusion: CHE353H1 or BIO130H1
Total AUs: 38.4 (Fall), 41.6 (Winter), 80 (Full Year)

BME330H1 - Patents in Biology and Medical Devices

BME330H1 - Patents in Biology and Medical Devices
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

The emphasis of the course is on applying the logic of patents to diverse cases of products through biology and biomedical engineering. A commercial context will be ever present the case studies. Students will work in teams on these problems in class. Students will learn to apply tests for obviousness, inventiveness, novelty and enablement based on the use of these tests in technology patents in the past. Claim construction will be introduced towards the end of the course to learn how technologies can be protected in considering a patent. There will be papers for reading in this course but no textbook. This course is designed for senior undergraduate students (3-4 year).

Prerequisite: CHE353H1 or BME205H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

BME331H1 - Physiological Control Systems

BME331H1 - Physiological Control Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Introduces physiological concepts and selected physiological control systems present in the human body, and proposes quantitative modeling approaches for these systems. Topics covered will include (1) the endocrine system and its subsystems, including glucose regulation and the stress response, (2) the cardiovascular system and related aspects such as cardiac output, venous return, control of blood flow by the tissues, and nervous regulation of circulation, and (3) the nervous and musculoskeletal systems, including the control of voluntary motion. Linear control theory will be used to develop skills in system modeling and examine concepts of system response and system control in the context of a healthy human body.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

BME350H1 - Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ Systems

BME350H1 - Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

An introduction to human anatomy and physiology with selected focus on the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and endocrine systems. The structures and mechanisms responsible for proper function of these complex systems will be examined in the healthy and diseased human body. The integration of different organ systems will be stressed, with a specific focus on the structure-function relationship. Application of biomedical engineering technologies in maintaining homeostasis will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: BME205H1
Corequisite: BME395H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

BME395H1 - Biomedical Systems Engineering II: Cells and Tissues

BME395H1 - Biomedical Systems Engineering II: Cells and Tissues
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6T/12.8P

Tissue engineering is largely based on concepts that emerged from developmental biology. This course provides an introduction to the study of animal development, both at the cellular and molecular levels. Topics include developmental patterning, differential gene expression, morphogenesis, stem cells, repair and regeneration.

Corequisite: BME350H1
Exclusion: CHE353H1
Total AUs: 0 (Fall), 0 (Winter), 0 (Full Year)

BME435H1 - Biostatistics

BME435H1 - Biostatistics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This is intended to provide students interested in biomedical research with an introduction to core statistical concepts and methods, including experimental design. The course also provides a good foundation in the use of discovery tools provided by a data analysis and visualization software. The topics covered will include: i) Importance of being uncertain; ii) Error bars; iii) Significance, p-values and t-tests; iv) Power and sample size; v) Visualizing samples with box plots; vi) Comparing samples; vii) Non parametric tests; viii) Designing comparative experiments; ix) Analysis of variance and blocking; x) Replication; xi) Two-factor designs; xii) Association, correlation and causation; xiii) Simple linear regression; xiv) Regression diagnostics. The concepts will be illustrated with realistic examples that are commonly encountered by biomedical researchers (as opposed to the simpler examples described in entry-level textbooks). The statistical softwares used in this course are JMP and R Studio.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

BME440H1 - Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation

BME440H1 - Biomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/51.2P

Fundamental biomedical research technologies with specific focus on cellular and molecular methodologies. Examples include DNA and protein analysis and isolation, microscopy, cell culture and cellular assays. Combines both theoretical concepts and hand-on practical experience via lectures and wet labs, respectively. Specific applications as applied to biotechnology and medicine will also be outlined and discussed.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

BME445H1 - Neural Bioelectricity

BME445H1 - Neural Bioelectricity
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/16.2P

Generation, transmission and the significance of bioelectricity in neural networks of the brain. Topics covered include: (i) Basic features of neural systems. (ii) Ionic transport mechanisms in cellular membranes. (iii) Propagation of electricity in neural cables. (iv) Extracellular electric fields. (v) Neural networks, neuroplasticity and biological clocks. (vi) Learning and memory in artificial neural networks. Laboratory experiences include: (a) Biological measurements of body surface potentials (EEG and EMG). (b) Experiments on computer models of generation and propagation of neuronal electrical activities. (c) Investigation of learning in artificial neural networks. This course was previously offered as ECE445H1.

Prerequisite: ECE159H1/ECE110H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

BME455H1 - Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering II

BME455H1 - Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Engineering and biophysical tools are used to integrate and enhance our understanding of animal cell behaviour from the molecular to the tissue level. Quantitative methods are used to mathematically model the biology of cell growth, division and differentiation to tissue formation. Specific topics include receptor-ligand interactions, cell adhesion and migration, signal transduction, cell growth and differentiation. Examples from the literature are used to highlight applications in cellular and tissue engineering.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1 and CHE354H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

BME498Y1 - Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design

BME498Y1 - Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design
Credit Value: 1.00
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/38.4P

In this project-based design course, teams of students from diverse engineering disciplines (enrolled in the biomedical engineering minor) will engage in the biomedical technology design process to identify, invent and implement a solution to an unmet clinical need defined by external clients and experts. This course emphasizes "hands-on" practicums and lectures to support a student-driven design project. The UG Office will reach out in the summer to 4th year BME Minor students regarding course registration. For A&S students, approval to register in the course must be obtained from the course instructor by completing the application available through the BME UG Office.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

BME595H1 - Medical Imaging

BME595H1 - Medical Imaging
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/38.4P

An introductory course to medical imaging and is designed as a final year course for engineers. The main clinical imaging modalities are covered: magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, x-ray and computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and clinical optical imaging. Emphasis is placed on the underlying physical and mathematical concepts behind each modality, and applications are discussed in the context of how different modalities complement one another in the clinical setting. Early year engineering concepts are extensively used, including: basic electromagnetics theory, fields and waves, signals and systems, digital signal processing, differential equations and calculus, and probability and random processes. The laboratories involve image reconstruction and analysis for the various imaging modalities and a live animal imaging session.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

CHE230H1 - Environmental Chemistry

CHE230H1 - Environmental Chemistry
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The chemical phenomena occurring in environmental systems are examined based on fundamental principles of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry. The course is divided into sections describing the chemistry of the atmosphere, natural waters and soils. The principles applied in the course include reaction kinetics and mechanisms, complex formation, pH and solubility equilibria and adsorption phenomena. Molecules of biochemical importance and instrumental methods of analysis relevant to environmental systems are also addressed. (formerly EDC230H1S)

Prerequisite: CHE112H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE249H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis

CHE249H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Engineering analysis and design are not ends in themselves, but they are a means for satisfying human wants. Thus, engineering concerns itself with the materials used and forces and laws of nature, and the needs of people. Because of scarcity of resources and constraints at all levels, engineering must be closely associated with economics. It is essential that engineering proposals be evaluated in terms of worth and cost before they are undertaken. In this course we emphasize that an essential prerequisite of a successful engineering application is economic feasibility. Hence, investment proposals are evaluated in terms of economic cost concepts, including break even analysis, cost estimation and time value of money. Effective interest rates, inflation and deflation, depreciation and income tax all affect the viability of an investment. Successful engineering projects are chosen from valid alternatives considering such issues as buy or lease, make or buy, cost and benefits and financing alternatives. Both public sector and for-profit examples are used to illustrate the applicability of these rules and approaches.

Prerequisite: CHE221H1, CHE223H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE260H1 - Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer

CHE260H1 - Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/6.4P

Classical thermodynamics and its applications to engineering processes. Concepts of energy, heat, work and entropy. First and second laws of thermodynamics. Properties of pure substances and mixtures. Phase equilibrium. Ideal heat engines and refrigerators. Mechanisms of heat transfer: conduction, convection and radiation. Steady state heat transfer. Solution of conduction equation. Convective heat transfer coefficients. Momentum and heat transfer analogies. Basics of radiative heat transfer..

Exclusion: CHE210H1, CHE323H1, CHE326H1, CHE119H1, MSE202H1 or MIE210H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT195H1
Total AUs: 44.3 (Fall), 48 (Winter), 92.3 (Full Year)

CHE322H1 - Process Control

CHE322H1 - Process Control
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The major goal of this course is to teach students how to design control strategies for chemical processes. The first part of the course focuses on the types of interconnections encountered in chemical engineering, namely feedback, parallel and series connections, and their effect on the process dynamics. The second part of the course looks at the design of feedback, feedforward, cascade and multivariable control strategies for these processes and interprets these types of engineered interconnections in terms of the effect they have on the performance of the overall system. This course makes extensive use of active learning through computer simulation based on MATLAB/Simulink and Aspen Plus Dynamics software.

Prerequisite: APS106H1, CHE222H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE323H1 - Engineering Thermodynamics

CHE323H1 - Engineering Thermodynamics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Classical thermodynamics and its applications to engineering processes are introduced. Topics include: the concepts of energy, work and entropy; the first and second laws of thermodynamics; properties of pure substances and mixtures; the concepts of thermal equilibrium, phase equilibrium and chemical equilibrium; and heat engines and refrigeration cycles.

Prerequisite: CHE112H1, CHE221H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE353H1 - Engineering Biology

CHE353H1 - Engineering Biology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

Using a quantitative, problem solving approach, this course will introduce basic concepts in cell biology and physiology. Various engineering modelling tools will be used to investigate aspects of cell growth and metabolism, transport across cell membranes, protein structure, homeostasis, nerve conduction and mechanical forces in biology.

Exclusion: BME205H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE354H1 - Cellular and Molecular Biology

CHE354H1 - Cellular and Molecular Biology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

This course will cover the principles of molecular and cellular biology as they apply to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics will include: metabolic conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; nucleic acids; enzymology; structure and function relationships within cells; and motility and growth. Genetic analysis, immunohistochemistry, hybridomis, cloning, recombinant DNA and biotechnology will also be covered. This course will appeal to students interested in environmental microbiology, biomaterials and tissue engineering, and bioprocesses.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

CHE374H1 - Economic Analysis and Decision Making

CHE374H1 - Economic Analysis and Decision Making
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Economic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals. Cost estimation; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; inflation; equity, bond and loan financing; after tax cash flow; measures of economic merit in the private and public sectors; sensitivity and risk analysis; single and multi-attribute decisions. Introduction to micro-economic. Applications: retirement and replacement analysis; make-buy and buy-lease decisions; economic life of assets; capital budgeting; selection from alternative engineering proposals; production planning; investment selection.

Prerequisite: MAT194H1, ESC103H1
Exclusion: CHE249H1, CME368H1/MIE258H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE416H1 - Chemical Engineering in Human Health

CHE416H1 - Chemical Engineering in Human Health
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Life expectancy has consistently increased over the past 70 years due to advances in healthcare and sanitation. Engineers have played key roles in developing technologies and processes that enabled these critical advances in healthcare to occur. This course will provide an overview of areas in which chemical engineers directly impacted human health. We will study established processes that had transformative effects in the past as well as new emerging areas that chemical engineers are developing today to impact human health. Emphasis will be placed on quantitative approaches. Engineering tools, especially derived from transport phenomena and chemical kinetics will be used. Required readings, including scientific papers, will be assigned. Industrial visit and/or a hands-on project will be included.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1, CHE354H1/MIE331H1; BME205H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE441H1 - Engineering Materials

CHE441H1 - Engineering Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course advances the understanding of the use of materials in engineering design, with special emphasis on corrosion and the effect of chemical environment on long term failure modes. Students will learn how to apply material property data to specify materials for load bearing applications, thermal and other non-structural applications, and chemical containment and transport. Topics will include strength of materials concepts, an introduction to computerized materials databases, material failure modes and criteria, principles of corrosion, and practical applications of corrosion prediction and mitigation. Students are required to design a component of their choice and do a detailed materials selection as a major design project.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE450H1 - Bioprocess Technology and Design

CHE450H1 - Bioprocess Technology and Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/8.448P

Building upon CHE353 and CHE354, the aim of this course is to learn and apply engineering principles relevant to bioprocess engineering, including energetics and stoichiometry of cell growth, cell and enzyme kinetics, metabolic modeling, bioreactor design, and bioseparation processes. In addition to course lectures, students will complete two laboratory exercises that will provide hands-on learning in bioreactor set-up and use.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1 and CHE354H1
Total AUs: 45.2 (Fall), 49 (Winter), 94.2 (Full Year)

CHE451H1 - Petroleum Processing

CHE451H1 - Petroleum Processing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course is aimed at surveying the oil industry practices from the perspective of a block flow diagram. Oil refineries today involve the large scale processing of fluids through primary separation techniques, secondary treating plus the introduction of catalyst for molecular reforming in order to meet the product demands of industry and the public. Crude oil is being shipped in increasing quantities from many parts of the world and refiners must be aware of the properties and specifications of both the crude and product slates to ensure that the crude is a viable source and that the product slate meets quality and quantity demands thus assuring a profitable operation. The course content will examine refinery oil and gas operations from feed, through to products, touching on processing steps necessary to meet consumer demands. In both course readings and written assignments, students will be asked to consider refinery operations from a broad perspective and not through detailed analysis and problem solving.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE460H1 - Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment

CHE460H1 - Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Review of the nature, properties and elementary toxicology of metallic and organic contaminants. Partitioning between environmental media (air, aerosols, water, particulate matter, soils, sediments and biota) including bioaccumulation. Degradation processes, multimedia transport and mass balance models. Regulatory approaches for assessing possible effects on human health and ecosystems.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE462H1 - Food Engineering

CHE462H1 - Food Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The quantitative application of chemical engineering principles to the large-scale production of food. Food processing at the molecular and unit operation levels. The chemistry and kinetics of specific food processes. The application of chemical engineering unit operations (distillation, extraction, drying) and food specific unit operations such as extrusion, thermal processing refrigeration/freezing.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE467H1 - Environmental Engineering

CHE467H1 - Environmental Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor A course which treats environmental engineering from a broad based but quantitative perspective and covers the driving forces for engineering activities as well as engineering principles. Models which are used for environmental impact, risk analysis, health impact, pollutant dispersion, and energy system analysis are covered.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE469H1 - Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion Devices

CHE469H1 - Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion Devices
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The objective of this course is to provide a foundation for understanding the field of electrochemical conversion devices with particular emphasis on fuel cells. The topics will proceed from the fundamental thermodynamic in-system electodics and ionic interaction limitations to mass transfer and heat balance effects,t o the externalities such as economics and system integration challenges. Guest lecturers from the fuel cell industry will be invited to procide an industrial perspective. Participants will complete a paper and in-class presentation.

Exclusion: MIE517H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE471H1 - Modelling in Biological and Chemical Systems

CHE471H1 - Modelling in Biological and Chemical Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course outlines the methodology for the modelling of biological systems and its applications. Topics will include a review of physical laws, selection of balance space, compartmental versus distributed models, and applications of the conservation laws for both discrete and continuous systems at the level of algebraic and ordinary differential equations. The course covers a wide range of applications including environmental issues, chemical and biochemical processes and biomedical systems.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE475H1 - Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration

CHE475H1 - Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

An overview on structure, processing and application of natural and biological materials, biomaterials for biomedical applications, and fibre-reinforced eco-composites based on renewable resources will be provided. Fundamental principles related to linear elasticity, linear viscoelasticity, dynamic mechanical response, composite reinforcement mechanics, and time-temperature correspondence will be introduced. Novel concepts in comparative biomechanics, biomimetic and bio-inspired material design, and materials' ecological and environmental impact will be discussed. In addition, key material processing methods and testing and characterization techniques will be presented. Structure-property relationships for materials broadly ranging from natural materials, including wood, bone, cell, and soft tissue, to synthetic composite materials for industrial and biomedical applications will be covered.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

CHE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1, MIE488H1, MSE488H1 and CIV488H1.)

*Complementary Studies Elective

Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE507H1 - Data-based Modelling for Prediction and Control

CHE507H1 - Data-based Modelling for Prediction and Control
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course will teach students how to build mathematical models of dynamic systems and how to use these models for prediction and control purposes. The course will deal primarily with a system identification approach to modelling (using observations from the system to build a model). Both continuous time and discrete time representations will be treated along with deterministic and stochastic models. This course will make extensive use of interactive learning by having students use computer based tools available in the Matlab software package (e.g. the System Identification Toolbox and the Model Predictive Control Toolbox).

Prerequisite: CHE322H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE561H1 - Risk Based Safety Management

CHE561H1 - Risk Based Safety Management
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course provides an introduction to Process Safety Management. The historical drivers to improve safety performance are reviewed and the difference between safety management and occupational health and safety is discussed. National and international standards for PSM are reviewed. Risk analysis is introduced along with techniques for process hazard analysis and quantification. Consequence and frequency modelling is introduced. Rsik based decision making is introduced, and the course concludes with a discussio of the key management systems required for a successful PSM system.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE562H1 - Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering

CHE562H1 - Applied Chemistry IV - Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course serves as an introduction to concepts in polymer chemistry, polymer science and polymer engineering. This includes a discussion of the mechanisms of step growth, chain growth and ring-opening polymerizations with a focus on industrially relevant polymers and processes. The description of polymers in solution as well as the solid state will be explored. Several modern polymer characterization techniques are introduced including gel permeation chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis and others.

Exclusion: CHM426H1
Recommended Preparation: CHE213H1, CHE220H1 or equivalents
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CHE564H1 - Pulp and Paper Processes

CHE564H1 - Pulp and Paper Processes
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The processes of pulping, bleaching and papermaking are used to illustrate and integrate chemical engineering principles. Chemical reactions, phase changes and heat, mass and momentum transfer are discussed. Processes are examined on four scales: molecular, diffusional, unit operations and mill. In the tutorial each student makes several brief presentations on selected topics and entertains discussion.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE565H1 - Aqueous Process Engineering

CHE565H1 - Aqueous Process Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Application of aqueous chemical processing to mineral, environmental and industrial engineering. The course involves an introduction to the theory of electrolyte solutions, mineral-water interfaces, dissolution and crystallization processes, metal ion separations, and electrochemical processes in aqueous reactive systems. Applications and practice of (1) metal recovery from primary (i.e. ores) and secondary (i.e. recycled) sources by hydrometallurgical means, (2) treatment of aqueous waste streams for environmental protection, and (3) production of high-value-added inorganic materials.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CHE566H1 - Elements of Nuclear Engineering

CHE566H1 - Elements of Nuclear Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A first course in nuclear engineering intended to introduce students to all aspects of this interdisciplinary field. Topics covered include nuclear technology, atomic and nuclear physics, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission, nuclear reactor theory, nuclear power plants, radiation protection and shielding, environment and nuclear safety, and the nuclear fuel cycle.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE568H1 - Nuclear Engineering

CHE568H1 - Nuclear Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Fundamental and applied aspects of nuclear engineering. The structure of the nucleus; nuclear stability and radioactive decay; the interaction of radiation with matter including radiological health hazards; the interaction of neutrons including cross-sections, flux, moderation, fission, neutron diffusion and criticality. Poison buildup and their effects on criticality. Nuclear engineering of reactors, reactor accidents, and safety issues.

Exclusion: MIE414H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Civil Engineering

CIV220H1 - Urban Engineering Ecology

CIV220H1 - Urban Engineering Ecology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor Basic concepts of ecology within the context of urban environments. Response of organisms, populations, dynamic predator-prey and competition processes, and ecosystems to human activities. Thermodynamic basis for food chains, energy flow, biodiversity and ecosystem stability. Biogeochemical cycles, habitat fragmentation and bioaccumulation. Introduction to industrial ecology and life cycle assessment principles. Urban metabolism and material flow analysis of cities. Response of receiving waters to pollution and introduction to waste water treatment. Emphasis is on identifying the environment/engineering interface and minimizing environmental impacts.

Prerequisite: CHE112H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV250H1 - Hydraulics and Hydrology

CIV250H1 - Hydraulics and Hydrology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

The hydrologic processes of precipitation and snowmelt, evapotranspiration, ground water movement, and surface and subsurface runoff are examined. Water resources sustainability issues are discussed, including water usage and water shortages, climate change impacts, land use impacts, and source water protection. Conceptual models of the hydrologic cycle and basics of hydrologic modelling are developed, including precipitation estimation, infiltration and abstraction models, runoff hydrographs, the unit hydrograph method and the Rational method. Methods for statistical analysis of hydrologic data, concepts of risk and design, and hydrological consequences of climate change for design are introduced. Principles of open channel hydraulics are introduced. Energy and momentum principles are studied with application to channel transitions, critical flow, choked flow, and hydraulic jumps.

Prerequisite: CME270H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

CIV300H1 - Terrestrial Energy Systems

CIV300H1 - Terrestrial Energy Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Core Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.

Exclusion: ENV346H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV342H1 - Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes

CIV342H1 - Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Principles involved in the design and operation of water and wastewater treatment facilities are covered, including physical, chemical and biological unit operations, advanced treatment and sludge processing.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV375H1 - Building Science

CIV375H1 - Building Science
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/4.224000168P

The fundamentals of the science of heat transfer, moisture diffusion, and air movement are presented. Using these fundamentals, the principles of more sustainable building enclosure design, including the design of walls and roofs are examined. Selected case studies together with laboratory investigations are used to illustrate how the required indoor temperature and moisture conditions can be maintained using more durable and more sustainable designs.

Exclusion: CIV575H1
Total AUs: 49.1 (Fall), 53.3 (Winter), 102.5 (Full Year)

CIV440H1 - Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment

CIV440H1 - Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor. The process and techniques for assessing and managing the impacts on and risks to humans and the ecosystem associated with engineered facilities, processes and products. Both biophysical and social impacts are addressed. Topics include: environmental assessment processes; environmental legislation; techniques for assessing impacts; engineering risk analysis; health risk assessment; risk management and communication; social impact assessment; cumulative impacts; environmental management systems; the process of considering alternative methods for preventing and controlling impacts; and stakeholder involvement and public participation. Examples are drawn from various engineering activities and facilities such as energy production, chemical production, treatment plants, highways and landfills.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

CIV488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered in other Departments: MSE488H1, MIE488H1, ECE488H1 and CHE488H1.)

*Complementary Studies Elective

Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV531H1 - Transport Planning

CIV531H1 - Transport Planning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course is intended to provide the student with the following: the ability to design and execute an urban transportation planning study; a working knowledge of transportation planning analysis skills including introductions to travel demand modelling, analysis of environmental impacts, modelling transportation - land use interactions and transportation project evaluation; an understanding of current transportation planning issues and policies; and an understanding of the overall process of transportation planning and its role within the wider context of transportation decision-making and the planning and design of urban areas. Person-based travel in urban regions is the focus of this course, but a brief introduction to freight and intercity passenger transportation is also provided. A "systems" approach to transportation planning and analysis is introduced and maintained throughout the course. Emphasis is placed throughout on designing transportation systems for long-run environmental, social, and economic sustainability.

Prerequisite: CME368H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV536H1 - Urban Activity, Air Pollution, and Health

CIV536H1 - Urban Activity, Air Pollution, and Health
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This is an interdisciplinary course where the challenge of air pollution is introduced with a focus on urban areas. The interdependencies between transportation, air quality, and health are demonstrated. The city and the behaviour of its inhabitants constitute the context for the following course topics: overview of air pollutants in urban areas, urban air quality monitoring networks, mobile source emissions, air pollution and meteorology, atmospheric dispersion, chemical processes specific to cities, personal mobility and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, epidemiology of air pollution.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CIV541H1 - Environmental Biotechnology

CIV541H1 - Environmental Biotechnology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Principles involved in the design and operation of biologically-based treatment facilities are covered with considerations for energy efficiency and sustainability. The course includes water / wastewater biological unit operations, advanced treatment, sludge processing and composting, natural treatment systems and specialized bioengineered systems such as groundwater remediation and biological air treatment.

Prerequisite: CIV342H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

CIV550H1 - Water Resources Engineering

CIV550H1 - Water Resources Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Global and national water problems, law and legislation. Hydraulic structures. Reservoir analysis. Urban drainage and runoff control: meteorologic data analysis, deterministic and stochastic modelling techniques. Flood control: structural and nonstructural alternatives. Power generation: hydro and thermal power generation. Low flow augmentation. Economics and decision making.

Prerequisite: CIV250H1, CIV340H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV575H1 - Studies in Building Science

CIV575H1 - Studies in Building Science
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course examines the basic principles governing the control of heat, moisture and air movement in buildings and presents the fundamentals of building enclosure design. With this background, students are required to research advanced topics related to emerging areas of Building Science, and to write and present to the class an individual comprehensive paper related to their research. Lectures for this course will be jointly offered with those of CIV375H1.

Exclusion: CIV375H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV576H1 - Sustainable Buildings

CIV576H1 - Sustainable Buildings
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Building systems including the thermal envelope, heating and cooling systems, as well as water and lighting systems are examined with a view to reducing the net energy consumed within the building. Life-cycle economic and assessment methods are applied to the evaluation of various design options including considerations of embodied energy and carbon sequestration. Green building strategies including natural ventilation, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar water heaters, green roofs and geothermal energy piles are introduced. Following the application of these methods, students are introduced to efficient designs including LEED designs that lessen the impact of buildings on the environment. Exemplary building designs will be presented and analyzed.

Prerequisite: CIV375H1/CIV575H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV577H1 - Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities

CIV577H1 - Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Developing infrastructure for sustainable cities entails understanding the connection between urban morphology and physiology. This course uses a systems approach to analyzing anthropogenic material flow and other components of urban metabolism, linking them to the design of urban infrastructure. Elements of sustainable transportation, green buildings, urban climatology, urban vegetation, water systems and local energy supply are integrated in the design of sustainable urban neighbourhoods.

Prerequisite: CIV340H1, [CIV375H1/CIV575H1]
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV578H1 - Design of Building Enclosures

CIV578H1 - Design of Building Enclosures
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A brief summary of the science involved in controlling heat, moisture and air movement in buildings is presented at the outset of the course. With this background, methods of designing enclosures for cold, mixed, and hot climates are examined. Design principles related to the design of walls, windows and roofs are presented and applied. In particular, topics related to the control of rain penetration, air movement, and interstitial condensation are studied in detail. Emphasis is placed on developing designs based on fundamentals which can be verified with computer modelling solutions.

Prerequisite: CIV375H1/CIV575H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Civil and Mineral Engineering

CME259H1 - Technology in Society and the Biosphere I

CME259H1 - Technology in Society and the Biosphere I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Humanities and Social Science Elective
This course teaches future engineers to look beyond their specialized domains of expertise in order to understand how technology functions within human life, society and the biosphere. By providing this context for design and decision-making, students will be enabled to do more than achieve the desired results by also preventing or significantly reducing undesired consequences. A more preventively-oriented mode of practicing engineering will be developed in four areas of application: materials and production, energy, work and cities. The emphasis within these topics will reflect the interests of the class.

Exclusion: ESC203H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CME368H1 - Engineering Economics and Decision Making

CME368H1 - Engineering Economics and Decision Making
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The incorporation of economic and non-monetary considerations for making decision about public and private sector engineering systems in urban and other contexts. Topics include rational decision making; cost concepts; time value of money and engineering economics; microeconomic concepts; treatment of risk and uncertainty; and public project evaluation techniques incorporating social and environmental impacts including benefit cost analysis and multi-objective analysis.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CME500H1 - Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage

CME500H1 - Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Geochemistry of acid rock / acid mine drainage (ARD/AMD) which covers the role of bacteria in generating this global mining pollution issue and how mines currently treat and attempt to prevent it. An introduction to the underlying chemical reactions involved, the role of microbes in these processes and the mitigation and treatment strategies currently available.

* Course offering pending Faculty Council approval for 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisite: APS110H1/CHE112H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Computer Science

CSC343H1 - Introduction to Databases

CSC343H1 - Introduction to Databases
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 36L

Introduction to database management systems. The relational data model. Relational algebra. Querying and updating databases: the query language SQL. Application programming with SQL. Integrity constraints, normal forms, and database design. Elements of database system technology: query processing, transaction management.

Prerequisite: CSC111H1/ CSC165H1/ ​CSC240H1/ ​(MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT135Y1/ MAT137Y1/ ​MAT157Y1/ (MAT186H1, MAT187H1)/ (MAT194H1, MAT195H1)/ (ESC194H1, ESC195H1); CSC207H1/ CSC207H5/ CSCB07H3/ ECE345H1/ ESC190H1
Exclusion: CSC343H5, CSCC43H3, MIE253H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at A&S, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at A&S, are limited to a maximum of 1.5 credits in 300-/400-level CSC/ECE courses.
Total AUs: 34 (Fall), 34 (Winter), 68 (Full Year)

CSC384H1 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

CSC384H1 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 24L/12T

Theories and algorithms that capture (or approximate) some of the core elements of computational intelligence. Topics include: search; logical representations and reasoning, classical automated planning, representing and reasoning with uncertainty, learning, decision making (planning) under uncertainty. Assignments provide practical experience, in both theory and programming, of the core topics.

Prerequisite: (CSC263H1/​ CSC265H1/ CSC263H5/ CSCB63H3/ ECE345H1/ ECE358H1/ MIE335H1/ (CSC148H1, enrolled in ASMAJ1446A, completed at least 9.0 credits), STA220H1/ STA237H1/ STA247H1/​ STA255H1/​ STA257H1/ STA237H1/ STAB57H3/ STAB52H3/ ECE302H1/ STA286H1/ CHE223H1/ CME263H1/ MIE231H1/ MIE236H1/ MSE238H1/ ECE286H1/ PSY201H1)
Exclusion: CSC384H5, CSCD84H3. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at A&S, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at A&S, are limited to a maximum of 1.5 credits in 300-/400-level CSC/ECE courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC324H1

Electrical and Computer Engineering

ECE313H1 - Energy Systems and Distributed Generation

ECE313H1 - Energy Systems and Distributed Generation
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Three-phase systems; steady-state transmission line model; symmetrical three-phase faults; power system stability; symmetrical components; unsymmetrical faults and fault current calculation; distribution network; equivalent steady-state model of voltage-sourced converter; distributed energy resources (DR); distributed energy storage; interface between DR and power system.

Exclusion: ECE413H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

ECE316H1 - Communication Systems

ECE316H1 - Communication Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

An introductory course in analog and digital communication systems. Analog and digital signals. Signal representation and Fourier transforms; energy and power spectral densities; bandwidth. Distortionless analog communication; amplitude, frequency and phase modulation systems; frequency division multiplexing. Sampling, quantization and pulse code modulation (PCM). Baseband digital communication; intersymbol interference (ISI); Nyquist's ISI criterion; eye diagrams. Passband digital communications; amplitude-, phase- and frequency-shift keying; signal constellations. Performance analysis of analog modulation schemes in the presence of noise. Performance analysis of PCM in noise.

Prerequisite: (MAT290H1, ECE216H1) /(MAT389H1, ECE355H1)
Total AUs: 49.2 (Fall), 53.4 (Winter), 102.6 (Full Year)

ECE330H1 - Quantum and Semiconductor Physics

ECE330H1 - Quantum and Semiconductor Physics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The course introduces the principles of quantum physics and uses them to understand the behaviour of semiconductors. Topics to be covered include wave-particle duality, Schrodinger's equation, energy quantization, quantum mechanical tunnelling, electrons in crystalline semiconductors and other physical concepts that form the basis for nanotechnology, microelectronics, and optoelectronics.

Prerequisite: ECE221H1/ECE231H1
Exclusion: MSE235H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ECE335H1 - Introduction to Electronic Devices

ECE335H1 - Introduction to Electronic Devices
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Electrical behaviour of semiconductor structures and devices. Metal-semiconductor contacts; pn junctions, diodes, photodetectors, LED's; bipolar junction transistors, Ebers-Moll and hybrid-pi models; field effect transistors, MOSFET, JFET/MESFET structures and models; thyristors and semiconductor lasers.

Prerequisite: MAT291H1 and ECE221H1 and ECE231H1
Exclusion: MSE335H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ECE344H1 - Operating Systems

ECE344H1 - Operating Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

Operating system structures, concurrency, synchronization, deadlock, CPU scheduling, memory management, file systems. The laboratory exercises will require implementation of part of an operating system.

Prerequisite: ECE244H1 and ECE243H1
Exclusion: ECE353H1
Total AUs: 49.2 (Fall), 53.4 (Winter), 102.6 (Full Year)

ECE345H1 - Algorithms and Data Structures

ECE345H1 - Algorithms and Data Structures
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Design and analysis of algorithms and data structures that are essential to engineers in every aspect of the computer hardware and software industry. Recurrences, asymptotics, summations, trees and graphs. Sorting, search trees and balanced search trees, amortized analysis, hash functions, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, basic graph algorithms, minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, introduction to NP completeness and new trends in algorithms and data structures.

Prerequisite: ECE244H1 or equivalent with the permission of the Chair of the AI certificate/minor.
Total AUs: 46.5 (Fall), 50.4 (Winter), 96.9 (Full Year)

ECE350H1 - Semiconductor Electronic Devices

ECE350H1 - Semiconductor Electronic Devices
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

An explanation of the basic operation, design and limitations of semiconductor electronic devices, such as diodes and transistors. The topics covered include: electrons in semiconductors, semiconductors in equilibrium, transport of carriers, p-n diodes, metal-semiconductor contacts, bipolar junction transistors, metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors, and MOS field effect transistors. In addition, optoelectronic devices (e.g. photodiodes, light emitting diodes and lasers), semiconductor heterostructures, nanostructures (quantum dots, qubits) and transistor scaling will be discussed.

Prerequisite: PHY294H1
Exclusion: ECE335H1, ECE330H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

ECE353H1 - Systems Software

ECE353H1 - Systems Software
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

Operating system structure, processes, threads, synchronization, CPU scheduling, memory management, file systems, input/output, multiple processor systems, virtualization, protection, and security. The laboratory exercises will require implementation of part of an operating system.

Prerequisite: ESC190H1
Exclusion: ECE344H1, CSC369H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

ECE356H1 - Introduction to Control Theory

ECE356H1 - Introduction to Control Theory
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

An introduction to dynamic systems and their control. Differential equation models of physical systems using transfer functions and state space models. Linearization. Initial and input response. Stability theory. Principle of feedback. Internal Model Principle. Frequencey response. Nyquist stability. Loop shaping theory. Computer aided design using MATLAB and Simulink.

Prerequisite: MAT292H1
Exclusion: ECE311H1, AER372H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

ECE363H1 - Communication Systems

ECE363H1 - Communication Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

An introductory course in analog and digital communication systems. Analog and digital signals. Probability and random processes. Energy and power spectral densities; bandwidth. Distortionless analog communication; amplitude, frequency and phase modulation systems; frequency division multiplexing. Sampling, quantization and pulse code modulation (PCM). Baseband digital communication; intersymbol interference (ISI); Nyquist's ISI criterion; eye diagrams. Passband digital communications; amplitude-, phase- and frequency-shift keying; signal constellations. Performance analysis of analog modulation schemes in the presence of noise. Performance analysis of PCM in noise.

Prerequisite: MAT389H1, ECE355H1
Exclusion: ECE316H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

ECE367H1 - Matrix Algebra and Optimization

ECE367H1 - Matrix Algebra and Optimization
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course will provide students with a grounding in optimization methods and the matrix algebra upon which they are based. The first past of the course focuses on fundamental building blocks in linear algebra and their geometric interpretation: matrices, their use to represent data and as linear operators, and the matrix decompositions (such as eigen-, spectral-, and singular-vector decompositions) that reveal structural and geometric insight. The second part of the course focuses on optimization, both unconstrained and constrained, linear and non-linear, as well as convex and nonconvex; conditions for local and global optimality, as well as basic classes of optimization problems are discussed. Applications from machine learning, signal processing, and engineering are used to illustrate the techniques developed.

Prerequisite: AER210H1/MAT290H1, MAT185H1/MAT188H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ECE368H1 - Probabilistic Reasoning

ECE368H1 - Probabilistic Reasoning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course will focus on different classes of probabilistic models and how, based on those models, one deduces actionable information from data. The course will start by reviewing basic concepts of probability including random variables and first and second-order statistics. Building from this foundation the course will then cover probabilistic models including vectors (e.g., multivariate Gaussian), temporal (e.g., stationarity and hidden Markov models), and graphical (e.g., factor graphs). On the inference side topics such as hypothesis testing, marginalization, estimation, and message passing will be covered. Applications of these tools cover a vast range of data processing domains including machine learning, communications, search, recommendation systems, finance, robotics and navigation.

Prerequisite: ECE286H1/ECE302H1
Exclusion: CSC412H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

ECE410H1 - Linear Control Systems

ECE410H1 - Linear Control Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

State space analysis of linear systems, the matrix exponential, linearization of nonlinear systems. Structural properties of linear systems: stability, controllability, observability, stabilizability, and detectability. Pole assignment using state feedback, state estimation using observers, full-order and reduced-order observer design, design of feedback compensators using the separation principle, control design for tracking. Control design based on optimization, linear quadratic optimal control, the algebraic Riccati equation. Laboratory experiments include computer-aided design using MATLAB and the control of an inverted pendulum on a cart.

Prerequisite: ECE311H1
Exclusion: ECE557H1
Total AUs: 49.2 (Fall), 53.4 (Winter), 102.6 (Full Year)

ECE411H1 - Adaptive Control and Reinforcement Learning

ECE411H1 - Adaptive Control and Reinforcement Learning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

An introduction to adaptive control and reinforcement learning for discrete-time deterministic linear systems. Topics include: discrete-time state space models; stability of discrete time systems; parameter adaptation laws; error models in adaptive control; persistent excitation; controllability and pole placement; observability and observers; classical regulation in discrete-time; adaptive regulation; dynamic programming; Rescorla-Wagner model; value iteration methods; Q-learning; temporal difference learning.

Prerequisite: ECE311H1 or ECE356H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

ECE419H1 - Distributed Systems

ECE419H1 - Distributed Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Design issues in distributed systems: heterogeneity, security, transparency, concurrency, fault-tolerance; networking principles; request-reply protocol; remote procedure calls; distributed objects; middleware architectures; CORBA; security and authentication protocols; distributed file systems; name services; global states in distributed systems; coordination and agreement; transactions and concurrency control; distributed transactions; replication.

Prerequisite: ECE344H1 or ECE353H1
Total AUs: 49.2 (Fall), 53.4 (Winter), 102.6 (Full Year)

ECE421H1 - Introduction to Machine Learning

ECE421H1 - Introduction to Machine Learning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

An Introduction to the basic theory, the fundamental algorithms, and the computational toolboxes of machine learning. The focus is on a balanced treatment of the practical and theoretical approaches, along with hands on experience with relevant software packages. Supervised learning methods covered in the course will include: the study of linear models for classification and regression, neural networks and support vector machines. Unsupervised learning methods covered in the course will include: principal component analysis, k-means clustering, and Gaussian mixture models. Theoretical topics will include: bounds on the generalization error, bias-variance tradeoffs and the Vapnik-Chervonenkis (VC) dimension. Techniques to control overfitting, including regularization and validation, will be covered.

Prerequisite: ECE286H1/STA286H1, ECE302H1/MIE231H1/CHE223H1/MIE236H1/MSE238H1
Exclusion: CSC411H1, ECE521H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ECE427H1 - Photonic Devices

ECE427H1 - Photonic Devices
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The human visual interface is rapidly evolving with the emergence of smart glasses, AR/VR wearable display, and autonomous vehicles. This course examines the photonic devices and integrated systems that underline such technologies, and how they are shaped by human visual perception and acuity. Advanced integrated photonic systems in optical display and sensing will be deconstructed and the underlying fundamental concepts studied. Topics include introduction to: heads up and wearable display, optical lidar, optical fiber, waveguide circuits, holography, optical switches, light sources (LED, laser), detectors and imaging sensors.

Prerequisite: ECE318H1/ECE320H1/ECE357H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ECE431H1 - Digital Signal Processing

ECE431H1 - Digital Signal Processing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

An introductory course in digital filtering and applications. Introduction to real world signal processing. Review of sampling and quantization of signals. Introduction to the discrete Fourier transform and its properties. The fast Fourier transform. Fourier analysis of signals using the discrete Fourier transform. Structures for discrete-time systems. Design and realization of digital filters: finite and infinite impulse response filters. DSP applications in areas such as communications, multimedia, video coding, human computer interaction and medicine.

Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

ECE446H1 - Sensory Communication

ECE446H1 - Sensory Communication
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Physical acoustics, acoustic measurements, electroacoustic transducers, and physiological acoustics. Speech processing, speech recognition algorithms and signal processing by the auditory system. Engineering aspects of acoustic design. Electrical models of acoustic systems. Noise, noise-induced hearing loss, and noise control. Introduction to vision and other modalities. Musical and psychoacoustics.

Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

ECE448H1 - Biocomputation

ECE448H1 - Biocomputation
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Modern technologies in the biosciences generate tremendous amounts of biological data ranging from genomic sequences to protein structures to gene expression. Biocomputations are the computer algorithms used to reveal the hidden patterns within this data. Course topics include basic concepts in molecular cell biology, pairwise sequence alignment, multiple sequence alignment, fast alignment algorithms, deep learning approaches, phylogentic prediction, structure-based computational methods, gene finding and annotation.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ECE454H1 - Computer Systems Programming

ECE454H1 - Computer Systems Programming
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

Fundamental techniques for programming computer systems, with an emphasis on obtaining good performance. Topics covered include: how to measure and understand program and execution and behaviour, how to get the most out of an optimizing compiler, how memory is allocated and managed, and how to exploit caches and the memory hierarchy. Furthermore, current trends in multicore, multithreaded and data parallel hardware, and how to exploit parallelism in their programs will be covered.

Total AUs: 49.2 (Fall), 53.4 (Winter), 102.6 (Full Year)

ECE470H1 - Robot Modeling and Control

ECE470H1 - Robot Modeling and Control
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Classification of robot manipulators, kinematic modeling, forward and inverse kinematics, velocity kinematics, path planning, point-to-point trajectory planning, dynamic modeling, Euler-Lagrange equations, inverse dynamics, joint control, computed torque control, passivity-based control, feedback linearization.

Prerequisite: ECE311H1 or ECE356H1
Exclusion: AER525H1
Total AUs: 49.2 (Fall), 53.4 (Winter), 102.6 (Full Year)

ECE472H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship

ECE472H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The economic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals are discussed. Cost concepts; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; the time value of money and compound interest; inflation; capital budgeting; equity, bond and loan financing; income tax and after-tax cash flow in engineering project proposals; measures of economic merit in the public sector; sensitivity and risk analysis. Applications: evaluations of competing engineering project alternatives; replacement analysis; economic life of assets; lease versus buy decisions; break-even and sensitivity analysis. Entrepreneurship and the Canadian business environment will be discussed.

Total AUs: 46.5 (Fall), 50.4 (Winter), 96.9 (Full Year)

ECE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

ECE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: MSE488H1, MIE488H1, CHE488H1 and CIV488H1.)

*Complementary Studies Elective

Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ECE516H1 - Intelligent Image Processing

ECE516H1 - Intelligent Image Processing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

This course provides the student with the fundamental knowledge needed in the rapidly growing field of Personal Cybernetics, including "Wearable Computing", "Personal Technologies", "Human Computer Interaction (HCI)," "Mobile Multimedia," "Augmented Reality," "Mediated Reality," CyborgLogging," and the merging of communications devices such as portable telephones with computational and imaging devices. The focus is on fundamental aspects and new inventions for human-computer interaction. Topics to be covered include: mediated reality, Personal Safety Devices, lifelong personal video capture, the Eye Tap principle, collinearity criterion, comparametric equations, photoquantigraphic imaging, lightvector spaces, anti-homomorphic imaging, application of personal imaging to the visual arts, and algebraic projective geometry.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

ECE520H1 - Power Electronics

ECE520H1 - Power Electronics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/16.2P

Focuses on power electronic converters utilized in applications ranging from low-power mobile devices to higher power applications such as electric vehicles, server farms, microgrids, and renewable energy systems. Concepts covered include the principles of efficient electrical energy processing (dc-dc, dc/ac, and ac/ac) through switch-mode energy conversion, converter loss analysis, large- and small-signal modeling of power electronic circuits and controller design.

Prerequisite: ECE314H1/ECE349H1/ECE359H1
Exclusion: ECE514H1, ECE533H1
Total AUs: 48.8 (Fall), 52.9 (Winter), 101.7 (Full Year)

ECE532H1 - Digital Systems Design

ECE532H1 - Digital Systems Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

Advanced digital systems design concepts including project planning, design flows, embedded processors, hardware/software interfacing and interactions, software drivers, embedded operating systems, memory interfaces, system-level timing analysis, clocking and clock domains. A significant design project is undertaken and implemented on an FPGA development board.

Prerequisite: ECE342H1 or ECE352H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

ECE557H1 - Linear Control Theory

ECE557H1 - Linear Control Theory
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

State-space approach to linear system theory. Mathematical background in linear algebra, state space equations vs. transfer functions, solutions of linear ODE’s, state transition matrix, Jordan form, controllability, eigenvalue assignment using state feedback, observability, designing observers, separation principle, Kalman filters, tracking and the regulator problem, linear quadratic optimal control, stability. Laboratories cover the state space control design methodology.

Prerequisite: ECE356H1/AER362H1
Exclusion: ECE410H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

ECE568H1 - Computer Security

ECE568H1 - Computer Security
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

As computers permeate our society, the security of such computing systems is becoming of paramount importance. This course covers principles of computer systems security. To build secure systems, one must understand how attackers operate. This course starts by teaching students how to identify security vulnerabilities and how they can be exploited. Then techniques to create secure systems and defend against such attacks will be discussed. Industry standards for conducting security audits to establish levels of security will be introduced. The course will include an introduction to basic cryptographic techniques as well as hardware used to accelerate cryptographic operations in ATM's and webservers.

Prerequisite: ECE344H1 or ECE353H1
Total AUs: 49.2 (Fall), 53.4 (Winter), 102.6 (Full Year)

Engineering Science

ESC203H1 - Engineering and Society

ESC203H1 - Engineering and Society
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

Through this course, students will examine the relationship between engineering and society, emphasizing a humanities and social sciences perspective. Building on the Praxis courses, students will develop and apply an understanding of ethics and equity to broader sociotechnical systems and challenges. Using models of critical thinking, active learning activities and discussion seminars, students will develop an understanding of the social and environmental impacts of technology. Students will further develop their communication, teamwork and professional skills through persuasive writing, facilitation and formal debate. Upon completion of the course, students will have an appreciation for the complex interaction between human society and technology, and will be able to analyze and evaluate the social, technological, political, and ethical dimensions of technology.

Humanities and Social Science elective.

Exclusion: CME259H1
Recommended Preparation: ESC102H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Forestry

FOR308H1 - Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development

FOR308H1 - Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Humanities and Social Science elective

Trees and their components have been used through the centuries for shelter, heat, entertainment, weapons, sport, furnishings, communication, food and medicines. This course explores the co-evolution of nature and culture by examining the social and economic impacts that the forest and its exploitation had in the development of societies throughout the ages. Focus will be on the cultural history of wood and products derived from it and its influence on developing societies from biblical times to modern day. The course will examine how wood's versatility and usefulness in varied applications has been discovered by society as needs for survival to austerity develop. The unique properties of woody materials will be examined to expose its ability to meet the varied demands of societies throughout the ages. This course will allow students to explore the place and role of wood derived products in sustainable society.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

FOR421H1 - Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City Forests

FOR421H1 - Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City Forests
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L

Complementary Studies elective

With over 80% of the world's population now living in cities, tomorrow's forests will be urban. Increasing global recognition of nature deficit disorder and the values of green infrastructure to mitigate broader human impacts gives a new meaning to the term 'urban forestry', coined here at UofT and now recognized widely. Trees in and around the city are key to providing multiple engineered and ecological services that only recently have been brought into the responsible fiscal planning of every municipality around the globe. If managed properly (a key concept), urban forests mitigate climate change and urban heat island effects, act as carbon sinks, air filters, water purifiers, air conditioners, noise dampeners, wildlife and/or biodiversity refuges, and green spaces for the human spirit. Here, we explore the challenges and opportunities of this exciting new applied field at the cross-roads of ecology, engineering and planning to ensure future global sustainability.

Exclusion: FOR416H1
Total AUs: 23.6 (Fall), 25.6 (Winter), 49.2 (Full Year)

FOR424H1 - Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials

FOR424H1 - Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

Sustainable materials are a mandate for sustainable societies. This course will explore the manufacturing, engineering principles and design fundamentals for creating sustainable materials from renewable resources. Special emphasis will be on bioplastics, biofibre, nanobiofibre, biocomposites and nanobiocomposites. Written communication and design skills will be developed through tutorials and assignments.

Exclusion: FOR423H1
Recommended Preparation: Basic knowledge of materials science.
Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

FOR425H1 - Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology

FOR425H1 - Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

Technological advances and approaches in deriving biofuels, chemical feedstocks from forest and other biomass resources. Fundamental chemical attributes of biomass, as they affect the fuel value and potential for deriving liquid, solid and gaseous fuels and valuable chemicals for other applications will be explored.

Exclusion: FOR410H1
Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

Geography

GGR252H1 - Marketing Geography

GGR252H1 - Marketing Geography
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 24L/4T

Geography matters in the success of both public and private sector organizations. Using mostly retail examples contemporary location problems are addressed. The geographies of demand and supply are analyzed and trade area and site selection techniques are applied. The relevance of the planning context and utility of geovisualization techniques such as GIS are also briefly considered.

Exclusion: GGR252H5
Total AUs: 27.6 (Fall), 27.6 (Winter), 55.2 (Full Year)

History and Philosophy of Science

HPS210H1 - Scientific Revolutions I

HPS210H1 - Scientific Revolutions I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 24L

Case studies in the history of science from antiquity to 1800, including the revolutionary work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Linnaeus, Lavoisier, and Herschel. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.

Exclusion: HPS200Y1
Total AUs: 32 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 64 (Full Year)

HPS283H1 - The Engineer in History

HPS283H1 - The Engineer in History
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

Humanities and Social Science elective

The emphasis in this course will be more on the history of engineers as workers, members of professional groups, and managers rather than engineering proper, although obviously engineering cannot be ignored when we talk about engineers' work. The aim of the course is to give an understanding of the heritage of engineers as participants in the economy and society.

Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

Joint Courses

JRE300H1 - Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance

JRE300H1 - Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Complementary Studies elective

Introduces a brief overview of essential concepts in accounting and corporate finance. The first part of the course covers the fundamentals of accounting. We start by exploring the basic language of accounting and the fundamental concepts of financial reporting. Students learn to read and analyze basic financial statements including the statements of financial position, comprehensive income, changes in equity, and cash flows. We then introduce key management accounting concepts and explore various methods of costing for decision-making. The second part of the course covers the fundamentals of corporate finance. In the second half, students will learn how to make financial projections and how to value complex investment opportunities. Following this, students learn various techniques for controlling risk and how to determine the appropriate cost of capital. Finally, the course considers issues in cash flow management and overviews project valuation as it relates to corporate mergers.

Exclusion: CHE375H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

JRE410H1 - Markets and Competitive Strategy

JRE410H1 - Markets and Competitive Strategy
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6P

Complementary Studies elective

Introduces the basic concepts, frameworks and methodologies useful to managers in crafting and executing entrepreneurial business strategies in technology-based companies. In the first part of the course, students gain an understanding of the external, internal, and dynamic environments of a business and the elements of a superior competitive position. In the second part, we focus on designing and delivering customer value, which involves strategic decisions about segmentation, targeting and positioning, and tactical decisions related to product introductions, marketing communications, distribution channels and pricing. In the third part of the course, we build on these fundamentals and examine challenges related to innovation and industry dynamics, such as industry life cycles, disruptive technologies, product renewal, and the relationship between R&D and commercialization.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

JRE420H1 - People Management and Organizational Behaviour

JRE420H1 - People Management and Organizational Behaviour
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Spans three inter-related topics within organizational behavior and human resources: individual behavior, group behaviour, and leadership. It provides students with both the theory and practice of how to work, lead, and thrive in organizations. Topics include theories of personality, learning, power, decision making, ethics, culture, communication, leadership, teamwork, and motivation teamwork. These topics are taught in three ways:

  1. Case studies, role play & simulation exercises followed by class discussion
  2. Surveys of Personality & Skills
  3. Lectures, discussions, and readings based on the current research on the topic

Exclusion: IRE260H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Mathematics

MAT336H1 - Elements of Analysis

MAT336H1 - Elements of Analysis
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 36L/12T

This course provides the foundations of analysis and rigorous calculus for students who will take subsequent courses where these mathematical concepts are central of applications, but who have only taken courses with limited proofs. Topics include topology of Rn, implicit and inverse function theorems and rigorous integration theory.

Prerequisite: MAT223H1/ MATA23H3/ MAT223H5/ MAT240H1/ MAT240H5, MAT235Y1/ MAT235Y5/ (MAT232H5, MAT236H5)/ (MATB41H3, MATB42H3)/ MAT237Y1/ (MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/ MAT237Y5/ (MAT185H1, MAT195H1/ ESC195H1)
Exclusion: MAT257Y1/ MAT337H1
Total AUs: 38.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 76.8 (Full Year)

MAT389H1 - Complex Analysis

MAT389H1 - Complex Analysis
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Course examines the following: analytic functions, Cauchy-Reimann equations, contour integration, Cauchy's theorem, Taylor and Laurent series, singularities, residue calculus, conformal mapping, harmonic functions, Dirichlet and Neumann problems and Poisson integral formulas. Course includes studies of linear differential equations in the complex plane, including Bessel and Legendre functions.

Prerequisite: MAT195H1, MAT292H1
Exclusion: MAT290H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

MIE242H1 - Foundations of Cognitive Psychology

MIE242H1 - Foundations of Cognitive Psychology
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

Introduction to neuroanatomy and processes that are core to perception, memory, executive functions, language, decision making, and action. Introduction to stress and emotions, regulation of thought and behaviour, and reward processing. Case studies in Addiction, Depression, Dementia, ADHD, and Dyslexia. Role of neuroimaging and brain lesions in demonstrating the functioning of different pathways and regions of interest within the brain. Use of experiments to test hypotheses concerning brain activities and computations. Conducting a literature review and reporting experimental research, use of elementary statistics, and satisfaction of research ethics requirements.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE243H1 - Mechanical Engineering Design

MIE243H1 - Mechanical Engineering Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/25.6P

Introduction to basic mechanical parts and mechanisms: gears, cams, bearings, linkages, actuators and motors, chain and belt drives, brakes and clutches, hydraulics and pneumatics. Tutorials on engineering drawing, sketching, and CAD/CAM in SolidWorks: views and drawing types, 2D sketching, 3D modeling and engineering drawing generation, modeling of assembly and motion analysis/animation. Conceptual design examples and mechanical engineering design process, including selection and applications of mechanisms. Dissection and reverse engineering of selected mechanical devices, mechanisms, and subsystems. Competitive group design project including technical report and 3D printing.

Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.

Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

MIE245H1 - Data Structures and Algorithms

MIE245H1 - Data Structures and Algorithms
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Introduction to algorithms (principles involved in designing, analyzing, and implementing algorithms). Basic data structures (lists, sets, maps, stacks, queues). Graphs and graph search. Decision algorithms (greedy methods and approximation algorithms). Sorting, divide-and-conquer, and recursive algorithms. Trees, heaps, and priority queues. Hashing and hash tables. Algorithmic analysis: big-O complexity. Numerical methods as examples of algorithms and big-O analysis (matrix inversion, matrix decomposition, solving linear system of equations).

Prerequisite: MIE262H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE258H1 - Engineering Economics and Accounting

MIE258H1 - Engineering Economics and Accounting
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Engineering economic and accounting concepts needed in the design of engineering systems. Financial analysis topics include: financial statements, depreciation, income tax, and basic accounting techniques. Project analysis topics includes: time value of money, evaluation of cash flows, defining alternatives, analysis of independent projects, acceptance criteria, buy or lease, make or buy, replacement analysis, economic analysis in the public sector, project risk and uncertainty. Inflation concepts.

Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent
Exclusion: CHE249H1, CHE374H1, CME368H1, ECE472H1, MIE358H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE304H1 - Introduction to Quality Control

MIE304H1 - Introduction to Quality Control
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

Introduction to quality engineering. Quality standards and certification. TQM. Modeling processes with simulation. Making inferences about product quality from real or simulation output data. Introduction to statistical process control. Control charts for variables and attributes. Process capability analysis. Lot Acceptance Sampling.

Prerequisite: MIE231 or equivalent
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE311H1 - Thermal Energy Conversion

MIE311H1 - Thermal Energy Conversion
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

Engineering applications of thermodynamics in the analysis and design of heat engines and other thermal energy conversion processes within an environmental framework. Steam power plants, gas cycles in internal combustion engines, gas turbines and jet engines. Refrigeration, psychrometry and air conditioning. Fossil fuel combustion and advanced systems includes fuel cells.

Prerequisite: MIE210H1, MIE313H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE313H1 - Heat and Mass Transfer

MIE313H1 - Heat and Mass Transfer
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/19.2P

Exact and numerical analysis of steady and transient conduction in solids. Solutions of one-dimensional and multidimensional systems. Principles of convection and solutions under laminar and turbulent flow over flat plates and inside and over pipes. Free convection. Thermal radiation between multiple black and grey surfaces. Analysis of open-ended design problems for improving thermal transport in commercial products.

Prerequisite: MAT234H1, MIE210H1, MIE230H1, MIE312H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 56.1 (Fall), 60.8 (Winter), 116.9 (Full Year)

MIE315H1 - Design for the Environment

MIE315H1 - Design for the Environment
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Life Cycle Assessment for the measurement of environmental impacts of existing products and processes. Design for Environment principles for the reduction of environmental impacts in new product and process designs. Functional, economic, and societal analysis taught for use in a major team-written project to compare and contrast two product or process alternatives for a client.

Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE343H1 - Industrial Ergonomics and the Workplace

MIE343H1 - Industrial Ergonomics and the Workplace
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

The Biology of Work: anatomical and physiological factors underlying the design of equipment and work places. Biomechanical factors governing physical workload and motor performance. Circadian rhythms and shift work. Measurement and specification of heat, light, and sound with respect to design of the work environment.

Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE346H1 - Analog and Digital Electronics for Mechatronics

MIE346H1 - Analog and Digital Electronics for Mechatronics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

A study of the fundamental behaviour of the major semiconductor devices (diodes, bipolar junction transistors and field effect transistors). Development of analysis and design methods for basic analog and digital electronic circuits and devices using analytical, computer and laboratory tools. Application of electronic circuits to instrumentation and mechatronic systems.

Prerequisite: MIE230H1, MAT234H1, MIE342H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

MIE354H1 - Business Process Engineering

MIE354H1 - Business Process Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6P

This course focuses on understanding multiple perspectives for grouping, assessing, designing and implementing appropriately integrated and distributed information systems to support enterprise objectives. The emphasis is on understanding how Business Process Management techniques and tools can contribute to align an organization's business and information technology perspectives, as well as the characteristics of application and system types and the implications for their design, operation and support of information needs, including those associated with different platforms and technology infrastructure e.g., legacy systems, client/server, the Internet and World Wide Web including the emergence of a web-service-based service oriented architecture. Students will work in the laboratory to develop business processes that can be specified and executed by information systems supporting BPEL, a widely supported standard for describing web-service-based business process.

Prerequisite: MIE253H1 or permission of the instructor
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE368H1 - Analytics in Action

MIE368H1 - Analytics in Action
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/38.4P

This course showcases the impact of analytics focusing on real world examples and case studies. Particular focus on decision analytics, where data and models are combined to ultimately improve decision-making. Methods include: linear and logistic regression, classification and regression trees, clustering, linear and integer optimization. Application areas include: healthcare, business, sports, manufacturing, finance, transportation, public sector.

Prerequisite: MIE237H1/ECE286H1, MIE262H1/MIE376H1, MIE263H1/STA347H1, or permission of the instructor
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE369H1 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

MIE369H1 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6P

Introduction to Artificial Intelligence. Search. Constraint Satisfaction. Propositional and First-order Logic Knowledge Representation. Representing Uncertainty (Bayesian networks). Rationality and (Sequential) Decision Making under Uncertainty. Reinforcement Learning. Weak and Strong AI, AI as Engineering, Ethics and Safety in AI.

Prerequisite: MIE250H1/ECE244H1/ECE345H1/CSC263H1/CSC265H1, MIE236H1/ECE286H1/ECE302H1
Exclusion: ROB311H1, CSC384H1
Total AUs: 48.1 (Fall), 52.2 (Winter), 100.3 (Full Year)

MIE407H1 - Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design

MIE407H1 - Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course covers the basic principles of the neutronic design and analysis of nuclear fission reactors with a focus on Generation IV nuclear systems. Topics include radioactivity, neutron interactions with matter, neutron diffusion and moderation, the fission chain reaction, the critical reactor equation, reactivity effects and reactor kinetics. Multigroup neutron diffusion calculations are demonstrated using fast-spectrum reactor designs.

Prerequisite: MIE230H1 or equivalent
Recommended Preparation: CHE566H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE408H1 - * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors

MIE408H1 - * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course covers the basic principles of the thermo-mechanical design and analysis of nuclear power reactors. Topics include reactor heat generation and removal, nuclear materials, diffusion of heat in fuel elements, thermal and mechanical stresses in fuel and reactor components, single-phase and two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transport in nuclear reactors, and core thermo-mechanical design.

Prerequisite: MIE407H1/MIE222H1, MIE312H1, MIE313H1 or equivalents
Recommended Preparation: CHE566H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE410H1 - *Finite Element Analysis in Engineering Design

MIE410H1 - *Finite Element Analysis in Engineering Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6P

Finite Element Method (FEM) is a very powerful numerical tool that has a wide range of applications in a multitude of engineering disciplines; such as mechanical, aerospace, automotive, locomotive, nuclear, geotechnical, bioengineering, metallurgical and chemical engineering. Typical applications include: design optimisation, steady and transient thermal analysis/stress analysis, wave propagation, natural frequencies, mode shapes, crashworthiness analysis, nuclear reactor containment, dynamic analysis of motors, manufacturing process simulation, failure analysis, to name a few. The focus of this course is to provide seniors and graduate students with a fundamental understanding of the principles upon which FEM is based, how to correctly apply it to real engineering problems using a commercial code. Specifically, participants will learn the principles governing model generation, discretization of a continuum, element selection, applying the loads and the constraints to real world problems. Participants will also learn how to scrutinize their model predictions, and avoid the pitfalls of this essential design tool.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE422H1 - Automated Manufacturing

MIE422H1 - Automated Manufacturing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/38.4P

Introduction to Computer Integrated Manufactuing. Definitions, terminology. Organization of manufacturing systems. Introduction to NC machines. Introduction to robotics. Types of robot motion. Robot kinematics. Jacobians, singularities. Robot motion trajectories. Interpolation, spline fits. Robot joint control. Flexible manufacturing systems, justification. Robot cell design. Group technology. Design of group technology cell. Programmable logic controllers. Limited enrolment.

Prerequisite: MIE221H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE424H1 - Optimization in Machine Learning

MIE424H1 - Optimization in Machine Learning
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

1. To enable deeper understanding and more flexible use of standard machine learning methods, through development of machine learning from an Optimization perspective.

2. To enable students to apply these machine learning methods to problems in finance and marketing, such as stock return forecasting, credit risk scoring, portfolio management, fraud detection and customer segmentation.

Prerequisite: MIE365H1/MIE376H1/ECE367H1/ROB310H1, or equivalent
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE438H1 - Microprocessors and Embedded Microcontrollers

MIE438H1 - Microprocessors and Embedded Microcontrollers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/38.4P

Review (number systems, CPU architecture, instruction sets and subroutines); Interfacing Memory; Interfacing Techniques; Transistors and TTL/CMOS Logic; Mechanical Switches & LED Displays; Interfacing Analog, A/D & D/A Conversions; Stepper Motors & DC Motors; RISC Technology and Embedded Processors; DAS Systems; Embedded Microcontroller System Design; CPU-based Control.

Exclusion: ECE243H1, ECE352H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE440H1 - * Design of Innovative Products

MIE440H1 - * Design of Innovative Products
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/25.6P

Recently developed methods applied at different stages of the design process include: Identification of unmet/underserved user needs through a modified definition of lead users (those who experience needs in advance of the mainstream population) including identifying/studying lead users, identifying which lead-user needs are relevant to the general population; Roles of function and affordance in successful products; Obstacles of fixation and cognitive bias to creativity; Concept generation methods including TRIZ/TIPS (Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, use of unrelated stimuli and analogy (e.g., from biology); Configuration design methods including design for transformation, design for assembly and end-of-life, e.g., reuse, repair and recycling. Hands-on experience of these topics in lectures, tutorials, and labs support successful application of the methods for the course project, as well as future design activities.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE441H1 - * Design Optimization

MIE441H1 - * Design Optimization
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6P

Problem definition and formulation for optimization, optimization models, and selected algorithms in optimization. Design for Tolerancing, Design for Manufacturing, and Design for Assembly. State of the art Computer Aided Design packages are introduced with case studies. Emphasis is placed on gaining practical skills by solving realistic design problems.

Prerequisite: MIE243H1, MIE222H1 or equivalents
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE442H1 - Machine Design

MIE442H1 - Machine Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4T/19.2P

Introduction to the fundamental elements of mechanical design including the selection of engineering materials, load determination and failure analysis under static, impact, vibration and cyclic loads. Surface failure and fatigue under contact loads, lubrication and wear. Consideration is given to the characteristics and selection of machine elements such as bearings, shafts, power screws and couplings.

Prerequisite: MIE320H1
Total AUs: 62 (Fall), 67.2 (Winter), 129.2 (Full Year)

MIE443H1 - * Mechatronics Systems: Design and Integration

MIE443H1 - * Mechatronics Systems: Design and Integration
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/64P

The course aims to raise practical design awareness, provide pertinent project engineering methodology, and generate a know-how core in integration of complex automation. This course has mainly practical content, and is integral and useful in the training and education of those students who plan to be employed in areas related to intelligent automation, as well as to the breadth of knowledge of all others. Although emphasis will be on robotic-based automation (mechatronics), the learning will be useful in all domains of system integration. This course will introduce students to the basics of integration, methodology of design, tools, and team project work. The course will be monitored based on projects from a selected list of topics. The lectures will be in format of tutorials as preparation and discussions on project related issues. A main goal is to bring the methods, means and spirit of the industrial design world to the class room. Emphasis will be on understanding the elements of integration, methodology and approaches, and will involve numerous case studies. Specifically the course will provide a practical step-by-step approach to integration: specifications, conceptual design, analysis, modeling, synthesis, simulation and bread-boarding, prototyping, integration, verification, installation and testing. Issues of project management, market, and economics will be addressed as well. Limited Enrolment.

Prerequisite: MIE346H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE444H1 - * Mechatronics Principles

MIE444H1 - * Mechatronics Principles
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/38.4P

This course provides students with the tools to design, model, analyze and control mechatronic systems (e.g. smart systems comprising electronic, mechanical, fluid and thermal components). This is done through the synergic combination of tools from mechanical and electrical engineering, computer science and information technology to design systems with built-in intelligence. The class provides techniques for the modeling of various system components into a unified approach and tools for the simulation of the performance of these systems. The class also presents the procedures and an analysis of the various components needed to design and control a mechatronic system including sensing, actuating, and I/O interfacing components.

Prerequisite: MIE342H1, MIE346H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE451H1 - Decision Support Systems

MIE451H1 - Decision Support Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Provides students with an understanding of the role of a decision support system in an organization, its components, and the theories and techniques used to construct them. Focuses on information analysis to support organizational decision-making needs and covers topics including information retrieval, descriptive and predictive modeling using machine learning and data mining, recommendation systems, and effective visualization and communication of analytical results.

Prerequisite: MIE253H1, MIE350H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE457H1 - Knowledge Modelling and Management

MIE457H1 - Knowledge Modelling and Management
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course explores both the modelling of knowledge and its management within and among organizations. Knowledge modelling will focus on knowledge types and their semantic representation. It will review emerging representations for knowledge on the World Wide Web (e.g., schemas, RDF). Knowledge management will explore the acquisition, indexing, distribution and evolution of knowledge within and among organizations. Emerging Knowledge Management System software will be used in the laboratory.

Prerequisite: MIE253H1, MIE350H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE458H1 - Biofluid Mechanics

MIE458H1 - Biofluid Mechanics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course will teach students how to apply fundamental fluid mechanics to the study of biological systems. The course is divided into three modules, with the focus of the first two modules on the human circulatory and respiratory systems, respectively. Topics covered will include blood rheology, blood flow in the heart, arteries, veins and microcirculation, the mechanical properties of the heart as a pump; air flow in the lungs and airways, mass transfer across the walls of these systems, the fluid mechanics of the liquid-air interface of the alveoli, and artificial mechanical systems and devices for clinical aid. The third and final module will cover a range of other fluid problems in modern biology.

Prerequisite: MIE312H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE469H1 - Reliability and Maintainability Engineering

MIE469H1 - Reliability and Maintainability Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

An introduction to the life-cycle costing concept for equipment acquisition, operation, and replacement decision-making. Designing for reliability and determination of optimal maintenance and replacement policies for both capital equipment and components. Topics include: identification of an items failure distribution and reliability function, reliability of series, parallel, and redundant systems design configurations, time-to-repair and maintainability function, age and block replacement policies for components, the economic life model for capital equipment, provisioning of spare parts.

Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent, MIE258H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

MIE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1, MSE488H1, CHE488H1 and CIV488H1.)

*Complementary Studies Elective

Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE505H1 - Micro/Nano Robotics

MIE505H1 - Micro/Nano Robotics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

This course will not be offered for the 2022-23 academic year.

This course will cover the design, modeling, fabrication, and control of miniature robot and micro/nano-manipulation systems for graduate and upper level undergraduate students. Micro and Nano robotics is an interdisciplinary field which draws on aspects of microfabrication, robotics, medicine and materials science.

In addition to basic background material, the course includes case studies of current micro/nano-systems, challenges and future trends, and potential applications. The course will focus on a team design project involving novel theoretical and/or experimental concepts for micro/nano-robotic systems with a team of students. Throughout the course, discussions and lab tours will be organized on selected topics.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE506H1 - * MEMS Design and Microfabrication

MIE506H1 - * MEMS Design and Microfabrication
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

This course will present the fundamental basis of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Topics will include: micromachining/microfabrication techniques, micro sensing and actuation principles and design, MEMS modeling and simulation, and device characterization and packaging. Students will be required to complete a MEMS design term project, including design modeling, simulation, microfabrication process design, and photolithographic mask layout.

Prerequisite: MIE222H1, MIE342H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

MIE515H1 - Alternative Energy Systems

MIE515H1 - Alternative Energy Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course covers the basic principles, current technologies and applications of selected alternative energy systems. Specific topics include solar thermal systems, solar photovoltaic systems, wind, wave, and tidal energy, energy storage, and grid connections issues. Limited enrolment.

Prerequisite: MIE210H1,MIE312H1 and MIE313H1 (or equivalent courses).
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE516H1 - Combustion and Fuels

MIE516H1 - Combustion and Fuels
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Introduction to combustion theory. Chemical equilibrium and the products of combustion. Combustion kinetics and types of combustion. Pollutant formation. Design of combustion systems for gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The use of alternative fuels (hydrogen, biofuels, etc.) and their effect on combustion systems.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE517H1 - Fuel Cell Systems

MIE517H1 - Fuel Cell Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Thermodynamics and electrochemistry of fuel cell operation and testing; understanding of polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy; common fuel cell types, materials, components, and auxiliary systems; high and low temperature fuel cells and their applications in transportation and stationary power generation, including co-generation and combined heat and power systems; engineering system requirements resulting from basic fuel cell properties and characteristics.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE520H1 - Biotransport Phenomena

MIE520H1 - Biotransport Phenomena
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Application of conservation relations and momentum balances, dimensional analysis and scaling, mass transfer, heat transfer, and fluid flow to biological systems, including: transport in the circulation, transport in porous media and tissues, transvascular transport, transport of gases between blood and tissues, and transport in organs and organisms.

Prerequisite: MIE312H1 /AER210H1 /equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE523H1 - Engineering Psychology and Human Performance

MIE523H1 - Engineering Psychology and Human Performance
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/38.4P

An examination of the relation between behavioural science and the design of human-machine systems, with special attention to advanced control room design. Human limitations on perception, attention, memory and decision making, and the design of displays and intelligent machines to supplement them. The human operator in process control and the supervisory control of automated and robotic systems. Laboratory exercises to introduce techniques of evaluating human performance.

Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1/ECE286H1 or equivalent required; MIE237H1 or equivalent recommended
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

MIE540H1 - * Product Design

MIE540H1 - * Product Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course takes a 360° perspective on product design: beginning at the market need, evolving this need into a concept, and optimizing the concept. Students will gain an understanding of the steps involved and the tools utilized in developing new products. The course will integrate both business and engineering concepts seamlessly through examples, case studies and a final project. Some of the business concepts covered include: identifying customer needs, project management and the economics of product design. The engineering design tools include: developing product specifications, concept generation, concept selection, Product Functional Decomposition diagrams, orthogonal arrays, full and fractional factorials, noises, interactions, tolerance analysis and latitude studies. Specific emphasis will be placed on robust and tunable technology for product optimization.

Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent, MIE243H1 or instructor's permission
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIE561H1 - Healthcare Systems

MIE561H1 - Healthcare Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

MIE 561 is a "cap-stone" course. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to integrate the Industrial Engineering tools learned in previous courses by applying them to real world problems. While the specific focus of the case studies used to illustrate the application of Industrial Engineering will be the Canadian health care system, the approach to problem solving adopted in this course will be applicable to any setting. This course will provide a framework for identifying and resolving problems in a complex, unstructured decision-making environment. It will give students the opportunity to apply a problem identification framework through real world case studies. The case studies will involve people from the health care industry bringing current practical problems to the class. Students work in small groups preparing a feasibility study discussing potential approaches. Although the course is directed at Industrial Engineering fourth year and graduate students, it does not assume specific previous knowledge, and the course is open to students in other disciplines.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE562H1 - Scheduling

MIE562H1 - Scheduling
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course takes a practical approach to scheduling problems and solution techniques, motivating the different mathematical definitions of scheduling with real world scheduling systems and problems. Topics covered include: job shop scheduling, timetabling, project scheduling, and the variety of solution approaches including constraint programming, local search, heuristics, and dispatch rules. Also covered will be information engineering aspects of building scheduling systems for real world problems.

Prerequisite: MIE262H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MIE566H1 - Decision Making Under Uncertainty

MIE566H1 - Decision Making Under Uncertainty
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/25.6P

Methods of analysis for decision making in the face of uncertainty and opponents. Topics include subjective discrete and continuous probability, utility functions, decision trees, influence diagrams, bayesian networks, multi-attribute utility functions, static and dynamic games with complete and incomplete information, bayesian games. Supporting software.

Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

Mineral Engineering

MIN330H1 - Mining Environmental Management

MIN330H1 - Mining Environmental Management
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course provides an overview of the major aspects of mining environmental management from exploration, through design and development of the property, into operation, and final closure implementation. An applied approach is taken utilizing case studies and examples where possible. Participation and discussion is an integral part of the course. Topics include sustainable development, environmental impacts, designing for mitigation, environmental management systems and reclamation.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN511H1 - Integrated Mine Waste Engineering

MIN511H1 - Integrated Mine Waste Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The engineering design of conventional mine waste management systems, including tailings ponds, rock dumps, and underground mine backfill systems, is considered first. Emerging trends in integrated mine waste management systems, including paste stacking and "paste rock" on surface, and cemented paste backfill forunderground mining will then be covered. Engineering case studies will be used throughout, and each case study will be evaluated in terms of how the mine waste systems used contribute to the economic and environmental sustainability of the mining operation.

Prerequisite: CME321H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Materials Science and Engineering

MSE343H1 - Biomaterials

MSE343H1 - Biomaterials
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 26L/13P

Provides an overview of the field of biomaterials, introducing fundamental biological and materials design and selection concepts, and is open to CHE students. Key applications of materials for biomedical devices will be covered, along with an introduction to the expected biological responses. The concept of biocompatibility will be introduced along with the essential elements of biology related to an understanding of this criterion for biomaterial selection and implant design. In addition, structure-property relationships in both biological and bio-inspired materials will be highlighted.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE355H1 - Materials Production

MSE355H1 - Materials Production
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Materials life cycle, primary and secondary resources, resource life and sustainability. Technologies and unit operations used in the production of light metals, non-ferrous and ferrous metals. Energy use and conservation in production of materials. Benefits and technologies of recycling. Treatment of waste streams for value recovery and safe disposal

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE415H1 - Environmental Degradation of Materials

MSE415H1 - Environmental Degradation of Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course deals with four major areas: electrochemistry of low temperature aqueous solvents, the corrosion of materials, mechano-chemical effects in materials and corrosion prevention in design. Electrochemistry deals with thermodynamics of material-electrolyte systems involving ion-solvent, ion-ion interactions, activity coefficients, Nernst equation and Pourbaix diagrams, and rate theory through activation and concentration polarization. Corrosion of metallic, polymeric, ceramic, composite, electronic and biomaterials will be explored along with mechano-chemical effects of stress corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion fatigue. Corrosion prevention in terms of case histories and the use of expert systems in materials selection.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE419H1 - Fracture and Failure Analysis

MSE419H1 - Fracture and Failure Analysis
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Fracture mechanisms and mechanics of solid materials. Topics include: nature of brittle and ductile fracture, macro-phenomena and micro-mechanisms of failure of various materials, mechanisms of fatigue; crack nucleation and propagation, Griffith theory, stress field at crack tips, stress intensity factor and fracture toughness, crack opening displacement, energy principle and the J-integral, fracture mechanics in fatigue, da/dN curves and their significance. Practical examples of fatigue analysis and fundamentals of non-destructive testing.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE430H1 - Electronic Materials

MSE430H1 - Electronic Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 26L/13T

Materials parameters and electronic properties of semiconductors are discussed as basic factors in the engineering of semiconductor devices. Materials parameters are related to preparation and processing methods, and thus to the electronic properties. The implications of materials parameters and properties on selected simple devices are discussed.

Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

MSE431H1 - Forensic Engineering

MSE431H1 - Forensic Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The course provides participants with an understanding of scientific and engineering investigation methods and tools to assess potential sources, causes and solutions for prevention of failure due to natural accidents, fire, high and low speed impacts, design defects, improper selection of materials, manufacturing defects, improper service conditions, inadequate maintenance and human error. The fundamentals of accident reconstruction principles and procedures for origin and cause investigations are demonstrated through a wide range of real world case studies including: medical devices, sports equipment, electronic devices, vehicular collisions, structural collapse, corrosion failures, weld failures, fire investigations and patent infringements. Compliance with industry norms and standards, product liability, sources of liability, proving liability, defense against liability and other legal issues will be demonstrated with mock courtroom trial proceedings involving invited professionals to elucidate the role of an engineer as an expert witness in civil and criminal court proceedings.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE440H1 - Biomaterial Processing and Properties

MSE440H1 - Biomaterial Processing and Properties
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/13T

Currently used biomaterials for formation of surgical implants and dental restorations include selected metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites. The selection and processing of these materials to satisfy biocompatibility and functional requirements for applications in selected areas will be presented. Materials used for forming scaffolds for tissue engineering, and strategies for repair, regeneration and augmentation of degenerated or traumatized tissues will be reviewed with a focus on biocompatibility issues and required functionality for the intended applications.

Prerequisite: MSE343H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MSE459H1 - Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials

MSE459H1 - Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/26P

Various synthesis techniques to produce nanostructured materials will be introduced. These include methods involving the vapor phase (physical and chemical vapor deposition, organometallic chemical vapor deposition), the liquid phase (rapid solidification, spark erosion), the solid phase, (mechanical attrition, equal channel deformation) as well techniques producing these structures from solution (electrodeposition, electroless processing, precipitation). Secondary processing techniques to produce final products or devices will also be discussed.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE461H1 - Engineered Ceramics

MSE461H1 - Engineered Ceramics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 39L/24T

The unique combinations of physical, electrical, magnetic, and thermomechanical properties exhibited by advanced technical ceramics has led to a wide range of applications including automobile exhaust sensors and fuel cells, high speed cutting tool inserts and ball bearings, thermal barrier coatings for turbine engines, and surgical implants. This course examines the crystal and defect structures which determine the electrical and mass transport behaviours and the effects of microstructure on optical, magnetic, dielectric, and thermomechanical properties. The influence of these structure-property relations on the performance of ceramic materials in specific applications such as sensors, solid oxide fuel cells, magnets, and structural components is explored.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Physics

PHY427H1 - Advanced Physics Laboratory

PHY427H1 - Advanced Physics Laboratory
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 76.8P

Experiments in this course are designed to form a bridge to current experimental research. A wide range of experiments are available using contemporary techniques and equipment. In addition to the standard set of experiments, a limited number of research projects may be available. This laboratory is a continuation of PHY327H1.

Prerequisite: PHY327H1
Total AUs: 66.4 (Fall), 72 (Winter), 138.4 (Full Year)

Robotics

ROB310H1 - Mathematics for Robotics

ROB310H1 - Mathematics for Robotics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The course addresses advanced mathematical concepts particularly relevant for robotics. The mathematical tools covered in this course are fundamental for understanding, analyzing, and designing robotics algorithms that solve tasks such as robot path planning, robot vision, robot control and robot learning. Topics include complex analysis, optimization techniques, signals and filtering, advanced probability theory, and numerical methods. Concepts will be studied in a mathematically rigorous way but will be motivated with robotics examples throughout the course.

Prerequisite: MAT185H1, MAT292H1
Recommended Preparation: ESC103H1, ECE286H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

ROB311H1 - Artificial Intelligence

ROB311H1 - Artificial Intelligence
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

An introduction to the fundamental principles of artificial intelligence from a mathematical perspective. The course will trace the historical development of AI and describe key results in the field. Topics include the philosophy of AI, search methods in problem solving, knowledge representation and reasoning, logic, planning, and learning paradigms. A portion of the course will focus on ethical AI, embodied AI, and on the quest for artificial general intelligence.

Prerequisite: ECE286H1, ECE302H1 and ECE345H1, ECE358H1, CSC263H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

ROB313H1 - Introduction to Learning from Data

ROB313H1 - Introduction to Learning from Data
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course will introduce students to the topic of machine learning, which is key to the design of intelligent systems and gaining actionable insights from datasets that arise in computational science and engineering. The course will cover the theoretical foundations of this topic as well as computational aspects of algorithms for unsupervised and supervised learning. The topics to be covered include: The learning problem, clustering and k-means, principal component analysis, linear regression and classification, generalized linear models, bias-variance tradeoff, regularization methods, maximum likelihood estimation, kernel methods, the representer theorem, radial basis functions, support vector machines for regression and classification, an introduction to the theory of generalization, feedforward neural networks, stochastic gradient descent, ensemble learning, model selection and validation.

Prerequisite: ECE286H1, MAT185H1, MAT195H1, CSC263H1/ECE358H1
Exclusion: ECE421H1, CSC411H1, STA314H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

ROB501H1 - Computer Vision for Robotics

ROB501H1 - Computer Vision for Robotics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

An introduction to aspects of computer vision specifically relevant to robotics applications. Topics include the geometry of image formation, image processing operations, camera models and calibration methods, image feature detection and matching, stereo vision, structure from motion and 3D reconstruction. Discussion of the growing role of machine learning and deep neural networks in robotic vision, for tasks such as segmentation, object detection, and tracking. The course includes case studies of several successful robotic vision systems.

Prerequisite: ROB301H1/ECE324H1
Exclusion: CSC420H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC263H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

ROB521H1 - Mobile Robotics and Perception

ROB521H1 - Mobile Robotics and Perception
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

The course addresses fundamentals of mobile robotics and sensor-based perception for applications such as space exploration, search and rescue, mining, self-driving cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous underwater vehicles, etc. Topics include sensors and their principles, state estimation, computer vision, control architectures, localization, mapping, planning, path tracking, and software frameworks. Laboratories will be conducted using both simulations and hardware kits.

Prerequisite: ROB310H1, AER372H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

Statistics

STA410H1 - Statistical Computation

STA410H1 - Statistical Computation
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 36L

Programming in an interactive statistical environment. Generating random variates and evaluating statistical methods by simulation. Algorithms for linear models, maximum likelihood estimation, and Bayesian inference. Statistical algorithms such as the Kalman filter and the EM algorithm. Graphical display of data.

Prerequisite: STA302H1/ STAC67H3/ STA302H5; CSC108H1/ CSC110Y1/ CSC120H1/ CSC148H1/ CSCA08H3/ CSCA48H3/ CSCA20H3/ CSC108H5/ CSC148H5; MAT223H1/ MAT224H1/ MAT240H1/ MATA22H3/ MATA23H3/ MAT223H5/ MAT240H5/ MATB24H3/ MAT224H5
Total AUs: 38.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 76.8 (Full Year)

ISTEP

TEP234H1 - Entrepreneurship and Small Business

TEP234H1 - Entrepreneurship and Small Business
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 51.2L/12.8T

Complementary Studies elective

Part 1 of the 2 Part Entrepreneurship Program

The age of enterprise has arrived. Strategic use of technology in all sorts of businesses makes the difference between success and failure for these firms. Wealth creation is a real option for many and the business atmosphere is ready for you! Increasingly, people are seeing the advantages of doing their own thing, in their own way, in their own time. Entrepreneurs can control their own lives, structure their own progress and be accountable for their own success - they can fail, but they cannot be fired! After all, engineers are the most capable people to be in the forefront of this drive to the business life of the 21st century.

This course is the first of a series of two dealing with entrepreneurship and management of a small company. It is intended the student would  take the follow-up course TEP432 as they progress toward their engineering degree. Therefore, it is advisable that the descriptions of both courses be studied, prior enrolling in this one.

This is a limited enrolment course. If the number of students electing to take the course exceeds the class size limit, selection of the final group will be made on the basis of the "Entrepreneur's Test". A certificate will be awarded upon the successful completion of both courses, attesting to the student having passed this Entrepreneurial Course Series at the University of Toronto.

The course is based on real life issues, not theoretical developments or untried options. Topics covered include: Who is an entrepreneur; Canadian business environment; Acquisitions; Different business types (retail, wholesale, manufacturing, and services); Franchising; Human resources, Leadership, Business Law; and many others. Several invited visitors  provide the student with the opportunity to meet real entrepreneurs. There will be several assignments and a session project. Please note, the 5 hours per week would be used for whatever is needed at the time. Tutorials will not normally happen as the calendar indicates them.

Exclusion: CHE488H1/CIV488H1/ECE488H1/MIE488H1/MSE488H1/APS281H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

TEP343H1 - Engineering Leadership

TEP343H1 - Engineering Leadership
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8L/25.6P

Complementary Studies elective

This course is a practical approach to being a more productive engineer, based on the premise that for technology to become a reality, it must be translated through people. A key is understanding engineers lead in ways that reflect their skills and mind set. The course begins with examining: 1) the meaning of leading (Why do something?); 2) the processes of leading (How do you do you create a vision and motivate others?); and 3) the tools of leading (What steps do you take to lead?). Learning frameworks and personal working styles inventories, provide practical tools to assist the student to understand human nature and the logic of learning, to become a competent leader of self, teams and organizations. The student prepares to become a competent leader by undertaking to learn (understand and integrate) key skills, character attributes and purposeful behaviours. The course presents strategies for development of high-performance teams. Special attention is given to a number of subjects: transformational change, organizational culture, high performance work systems, and self-leadership. The course material is delivered through lectures, readings, in-class discussion and a team project. The project is based on the team interviewing the CEO of an engineering-intensive company or senior leader in the community. Students will be required to submit written reflections on course content and their personal experience.

Total AUs: 23.6 (Fall), 25.6 (Winter), 49.2 (Full Year)

TEP432H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business Management

TEP432H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business Management
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 51.2L/12.8T

Complementary Studies elective

Part 2 of the 2 Part Entrepreneurship Program

This is part two of the Entrepreneurship course series. The student  taking this course would typically plan to pursue a career in small business started by themselves, or in a family enterprise. The skills acquired, however, are very useful in any business where a graduate might end up in their career, without the need to  be an entrepreneur. Our approach to teaching is based on real-life business experiences and many years of successful practice of "what we preach". The course contains very little theoretical work or academic approaches. It is designed to familiarize you with the kinds of opportunities (problems) likely to be encountered in an entrepreneurial career. If you really want this lifestyle and are prepared to work hard, we will provide you with the practical knowledge and technical skills required to pursue this kind of career. Topics covered in this course include: Marketing and Sales; Legal issues; Financing the business; Human Resources challenges, the Business Plan and many other issues. Note, the course material may be adjusted between the two courses as required. We recognize the value of communication skills in the classroom and in project reports. We require that you learn how to present yourself in a business-like manner. As and when appropriate, outside visitors from the business community will join in and contribute to the class discussions. The course deals with practical concepts, actual past and current events, and is presented from the point of view of someone who has "done it all". This means  what you hear is the “real stuff”. There will be several assignments and the preparation of a full Business Plan as the session project. Please note,  the 5 hours per week will  be used for whatever is needed at the time, so tutorials will not normally happen as the calendar indicates them.

Prerequisite: APS234H1 / TEP234H1
Exclusion: CHE488H1/CIV488H1/ECE488H1/MIE488H1/MSE488H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

TEP442H1 - Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership

TEP442H1 - Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Complementary Studies elective

This course investigates the cognitive and psychological foundations of effective leadership. Students will explore current theories driving effective leadership practice, including: models of leadership, neurophysiological correlates of leadership, and psychodynamic approaches to leadership. Students will learn and apply skills, including: mental modeling, decision-making, teamwork and self-evaluation techniques. This course is aimed at helping Engineering students to gain practical skills, which will enhance their impact as leaders throughout their careers.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

TEP444H1 - Positive Psychology for Engineers

TEP444H1 - Positive Psychology for Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Humanities and Social Science elective

Many disciplines have explored happiness - philosophy, anthropology, psychology, sociology, neurobiology, film, art and literature - to name a few. Why not engineering? During the first part of the course, we will play catch-up, examining the scholarly and creative ways that people have attempted to understand what makes for a happy life. Then we turn our attention to our own domain-expertise, applying engineering concepts like: "balance", "flow", "amplitude", "dynamic equilibrium", "momentum" and others, to explore the ways  your technical knowledge can contribute to a deep understanding of happiness. This course is designed to challenge you academically as we analyze texts from a variety of disciplines. It is also designed to challenge you personally, to explore happiness as it relates to yourself, your own personal development and your success and fulfillment as an engineer.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

TEP445H1 - The Power of Story: Discovering Your Leadership Narrative

TEP445H1 - The Power of Story: Discovering Your Leadership Narrative
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

Humanities and Social Science elective

This course offers an introduction to relational, authentic and transformational leadership theory, by focusing on narrative and the power of storytelling. Students will practice storytelling techniques by: learning about the mechanics of stories; improve their public speaking by engaging in regular storytelling practice; explore their personal history by reflecting on their identities; and develop critical thinking skills regarding the stories (meta-narratives) that surround us; particularly as they relate to engineering problems/ethics. This is a highly experiential course with a focus on reading, discussion, practice and reflection.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

TEP447H1 - The Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in Engineering

TEP447H1 - The Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

The primary objective of this course is to help engineering students navigate the ambiguous world of engineering ethics and equity using case studies drawn from the careers of Canadian engineers. This course tackles complex ethics and equity challenges by focusing on multiple levels of practice: from design work to organizational practice and governance. By applying a systems lens, students will learn to develop the knowledge and skills needed for short-term and long-term action strategies. In addition to being exposed to a range of ethical theories, the PEO code of ethics, and the legal context of engineering ethics, students enrolled in this course will engage in ethical decision-making on a weekly basis.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

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