Mineral Engineering


Lassonde Mineral Engineering Program (AELMEBASC)

Undergraduate Academic Advisor
Shayni Curtis-Clarke
Room GB116, Galbraith Building
416-978-5905

shayni.curtis@utoronto.ca

Associate Chair, Undergraduate
Professor John Harrison
john.harrison@utoronto.ca

The first year of the four-year curriculum is similar to that of other engineering programs at the University. All subsequent years are unique to the Lassonde Mineral Engineering Program, with transfer into year two of Mineral Engineering being permitted from both the General Engineering (TrackOne) first year and other engineering programs. Year two curriculum concentrates on minerals engineering fundamentals, and years three and four comprise a minerals engineering core supplemented by technical electives. A wide range of technical electives are available, thereby allowing students to specialize should they so wish in one particular branch of minerals engineering. Students also study humanities and complementary studies electives in the final two years.

Practical aspects of the program are presented through laboratory sessions and students attend one survey and one geology field camp, each of which is two weeks in duration. Students are encouraged to obtain industrial experience during the summer breaks. They also have the opportunity to participate in the Professional Experience Year Co-op Program between years three and four.

Attractive entrance and in-course scholarships and bursaries are available, including the prestigious, competitively awarded Lassonde Scholarships. Mineral engineering encompasses those activities necessary to extract and process natural mineral resources. The Lassonde Mineral Engineering Program is comprehensive, covering topics from the entire scope of minerals engineering: from geology and mineral exploration, through analysis and design of surface and underground excavations, mechanical and explosive excavation of geological materials, planning and management of mines and quarries, processing of metallic, non‑metallic and industrial minerals, safety and environmental protection and on to financial aspects of minerals operations. This wide range of topics means that the program is truly interdisciplinary, using concepts and techniques from mathematics, physics, chemistry, geology and economics; in the setting of the University of Toronto it is thus both interdepartmental and interfaculty, with the Departments of Civil Engineering, Geology and Materials Science and Engineering contributing to the program. As Toronto is a world centre for mining and mining finance, the program is able to maintain close links with the minerals industry and thus invites recognised experts from various branches of the industry to deliver state-of-the-art treatment of specialized topics within the curriculum.

Graduates obtain a comprehensive training in minerals engineering and are well prepared for future challenges in the planning and financing of mineral and related engineering projects as well as for graduate study in mining, geological, or civil engineering. The program is accredited with the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board.

Personal Protective Equipment

There will be many occasions when students are required to use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), including safety footwear bearing the CSA Green Patch, hard hats, protective eyewear with side shields, tear away safety vests and ear protection. Students are required to purchase their own PPE.  All field trips, laboratories and other events require advance briefing on the nature of potential hazards and students are required to attend these briefings and to follow the provided instructions.

Practical Experience Requirement (PER) 

Students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience before graduation (normally during their summer vacation periods). Satisfactory completion of CME358H1: Survey Camp (Civil & Mineral Practicals) and MIN400H1: Geology Camp will contribute 200 hours towards this requirement. Satisfactory completion of PEY Co-op will also completely fulfil the Practical Experience Requirement.

Professional Experience Year Co-op Program (PEY Co-op)

Students registered within this program and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, may elect to enrol and participate in PEY Co-op. The program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating company. Detailed information is available through the Engineering Career Centre. 

Summer Field Camp

An August Field Camp must be completed by all Lassonde Mineral Engineering students in the summer before fourth year. Results of the course are used to compute the fourth-year Fall Term average. An extra fee is charged to cover part of the cost of transportation, food and accommodation.

Minors & Certificate Programs

A number of engineering minors and certificate programs are available and generally require the student to successfully complete a carefully selected slate of electives in their fourth year. Late in the Winter Term of  third year, students use an online pre-registration tool to indicate their preferred fourth-year electives. Students should review the various minor and certificate program requirements and attend the Department's information sessions during third year to ensure that the appropriate electives are taken in fourth year. Students should note that they can also complete the requirements of a minor or certificate program even after they have graduated, as long as the additional requirements are met within nine years of their initial registration in the BASc program. If completed after graduation, additional fees will be assessed and a transcript will be issued with the amended courses and indication of completed minor or certificate program requirements.

Jeffrey Skoll BASc / MBA Program

The Jeffrey Skoll Combined BASc / MBA Program allows qualified and selected students in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering to complete both a BASc and an MBA in a reduced time. Students will be admitted to the program prior to entering their fourth year of studies in the BASc program.  Interested students should contact the Rotman School of Management.

Graduate Training in Mineral Engineering

Students with the necessary qualifications (generally, at least a B+ average in the final year of the undergraduate program) who wish to proceed to graduate studies may do so through the Lassonde Institute, an interdisciplinary research institute for engineering geoscience. The Department of Civil Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Department of Geology and Collaborative Program in Geophysics are all collaborators in the Lassonde Institute.
 
U of T Engineering offers programs that lead to MASc, MEng and PhD degrees. Other departments offer MSc and PhD degree programs. Additional information may be found at www.lassondeinstitute.utoronto.ca or on the websites of the collaborating departments.
 

LASSONDE MINERAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (AELMEBASC)

LASSONDE MINERAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (AELMEBASC)

FIRST YEAR MINERAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session – Year 1   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
APS100H1: Orientation to Engineering F 1 - 1 0.25
APS110H1: Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science F 3 1 1 0.50
APS111H1: Engineering Strategies & Practice I F 3 - 2 0.50
CIV100H1: Mechanics F 3 - 2 0.50
MAT186H1: Calculus I F 3 - 1 0.50
MAT188H1: Linear Algebra F 3 1 1 0.50
Winter Session – Year 1   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
APS106H1: Fundamentals of Computer Programming S 3 2 1 0.50
APS112H1: Engineering Strategies & Practice II S 2 2 - 0.50
CHE112H1: Physical Chemistry S 3 1 1 0.50
MAT187H1: Calculus II S 3 - 1 0.50
MIN120H1: Insight into Mineral Engineering S 4 - 1 0.50
MIN191H1: Introduction to Mineral Engineering S 1 - - 0.15

Approved Course Substitutions

  1. Students are able to substitute MAT186H1 with the online calculus course APS162H1.
  2. Students are able to substitute MAT187H1 with the online calculus course APS163H1.
  3. Students are able to substitute APS110H1 with the online course APS164H1.
  4. Students are able to substitute CIV100H1 with the online course APS160H1.

SECOND YEAR MINERAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session – Year 2   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CME210H1: Solid Mechanics I F 3 1.50 1.50 0.50
CME261H1: Engineering Mathematics I F 3 1 1 0.50
CME270H1: Fluid Mechanics I F 3 1.50 1 0.50
ESS262H1: Earth Systems Processes F 2 3 - 0.50
MIN201H1: Mineral Engineering Field Excursion F - - - 0.20
MSE202H1: Thermodynamics I F 3 - 2 0.50
Winter Session – Year 2   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CME259H1: Technology in Society and the Biosphere I S 3 - 1 0.50
CME262H1: Engineering Mathematics II S 3 - 2 0.50
CME263H1: Probability Theory for Civil and Mineral Engineers S 3 - 2 0.50
ESS224H1: Introduction to Mineralogy and Petrology S 2 3 - 0.50
MIN250H1: Surface Mining S 3 - 1 0.50

THIRD YEAR MINERAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session – Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CME321H1: Geotechnical Engineering I F 3 1 1 0.50
CME358H1: Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals) F - - - 0.50
CME368H1: Engineering Economics and Decision Making F 3 - 1 0.50
ESS241H1: Geologic Structures and Maps F 2 3 - 0.50
MIN301H1: Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource Estimation F 3 - 1 0.50
MIN329H1: Engineering Rock Mechanics F 3 1 1 0.50
Winter Session – Year 3   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MIN320H1: Explosives and Fragmentation in Mining S 3 - 1 0.50
MIN330H1: Mining Environmental Management S 3 - 1 0.50
MIN350H1: Mineral Economics S 3 - 1 0.50
MIN351H1: Underground Mining S 3 - 1 0.50
MSE301H1: Mineral Processing S 3 1.50 1 0.50
CS/HSS Elective S       0.50

*CME358H1 – Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals) is a two-week field-based course taken in the month prior to starting Third Year. The results of this course are used in computing the student's Third Year Fall Session Average. An extra fee is charged to cover part of the costs of food and accommodation.

*In order to graduate, students must obtain credits in the equivalent of at least four half-year Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences (CS/HSS) Electives. Of these Electives, the equivalent of at least two half-year credits must be Humanities and Social Sciences. Refer to the Registrar's Office website for a list of pre-approved CS/HSS Electives.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR

Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enroll and participate in the Professional Experience Year Co-Op Program (PEY Co-Op). The PEY Co-op program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating industry. Details are described in the beginning of this chapter. More information can be found in the PEY Co-op section of the calendar. 

FOURTH YEAR MINERAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session – Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MIN466H1: Mineral Project Design I F 2 2 1 0.50
MIN565H1: Design and Support of Underground Mine Excavations F 3 - 1 0.50
CS/HSS or Technical Elective (see note) F       0.50
Field Camp          
MIN400H1: Geology Field Camp for Engineers F - - - 0.50
Choose two of the following Technical Electives:          
CHE565H1: Aqueous Process Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
CIV420H1: Construction Engineering F 3 - 2 0.50
CME499H1: Individual Project F - - 3 0.50
CME499Y1: Individual Project Y - - 3 1.00
CME538H1: Introduction to Data Science for Civil and Mineral Engineers F 3 - 1 0.50
CME549H1: Groundwater Flow and Contamination F 3 - 1 0.50
CME525H1: Tunneling and Urban Excavation F 3 - 1 0.50
ESS452H1: Geophysical Imaging with Non-seismic Methods F 2 - - 0.50
JGA305H1: Environmental and Archaeological Geophysics F 2 1 - 0.50
MIN511H1: Integrated Mine Waste Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
Winter Session – Year 4   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MIN467H1: Mineral Project Design II S 1 4 1 0.50
MIN470H1: Ventilation and Occupational Health S 3 - 1 0.50
CS/HSS or Technical Elective (see note) S       0.50
Choose one of the following Technical Electives:          
APS502H1: Financial Engineering S 3 - - 0.50
CIV300H1: Terrestrial Energy Systems S 3 - 2 0.50
CIV324H1: Geotechnical Engineering II S 3 1 1 0.50
CIV440H1: Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment S 3 - 1 0.50
CIV523H1: Geotechnical Design S 3 - 1 0.50
CIV580H1: Engineering and Management of Large Projects S 3 - - 0.50
CME499H1: Individual Project S - - 3 0.50
CME499Y1: Individual Project Y - - 3 1.00
CME500H1: Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage S 3 - 1 0.50
ESS331H1: Sedimentation and Stratigraphy S 2 3 - 0.50
ESS423H1: Mineral Deposits S 2 3 - 0.50
MIN520H1: Mine Optimization S 3 - 1 0.50

*MIN400H1 – Geology Camp is taken in the week prior to fall term of fourth year. The results of this are used in computing the student's fourth year fall session average. An extra fee is charged to cover cost of room, board and travel.

*Note. In year 4 students are required to select 2 CS/HSS electives and 3 technical electives. These courses may be taken in either term subject to maintaining the minimum required course load.

*Note: Technical Electives outside of the group of courses listed must be approved in advance. Students wishing to take elective courses from other departments need to ensure that they have the appropriate background and prerequisites. Students with an overall average of 75% or greater in their third year may take up to two graduate level (1000-series) courses, depending upon availability. In all cases the interested student should consult with the Department’s Office of Student Services (GB116) to obtain further information and the appropriate permission.


Mineral Engineering Courses

Applied Science and Engineering (Interdepartmental)

APS100H1 - Orientation to Engineering

APS100H1 - Orientation to Engineering
Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/12.8T

This course is designed to help students transition into first-year engineering studies and to develop and apply a greater understanding of the academic learning environment, the field of engineering, and how the fundamental mathematics and sciences are used in an engineering context. Topics covered include: study skills, time management, problem solving, successful teamwork, effective communications, exam preparation, stress management and wellness, undergraduate research, extra- and co-curricular involvement, engineering disciplines and career opportunities, and applications of math and science in engineering.

Total AUs: 17.7 (Fall), 19.2 (Winter), 36.9 (Full Year)

APS106H1 - Fundamentals of Computer Programming

APS106H1 - Fundamentals of Computer Programming
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

An introduction to computer systems and software. Topics include the representation of information, algorithms, programming languages, operating systems and software engineering. Emphasis is on the design of algorithms and their implementation in software. Students will develop a competency in the Python programming language. Laboratory exercises will explore the concepts of both Structure-based and Object-Oriented programming using examples drawn from mathematics and engineering applications.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

APS110H1 - Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science

APS110H1 - Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course is structured around the principle of the structure-property relationship. This relationship refers to an understanding of the microstructure of a solid, that is, the nature of the bonds between atoms and the spatial arrangement of atoms, which permits the explanation of observed behaviour. Observed materials behaviour includes mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical, and corrosive behaviour. Topics covered in this course include: structure of the atom, models of the atom, electronic configuration, the electromagnetic spectrum, band theory, atomic bonding, optical transparency of solids, magnetic properties, molecular bonding, hybridized orbitals, crystal systems, lattices and structures, crystallographic notation, imperfections in solids, reaction rates, activation energy, solid-state diffusion, materials thermodynamics, free energy, and phase equilibrium.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

APS111H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice I

APS111H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for understanding problem solving and developing communications skills. This first course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to the process of engineering design, to strategies for successful team work, and to design for human factors, society and the environment. Students write team and individual technical reports.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

APS112H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice II

APS112H1 - Engineering Strategies & Practice II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6P

This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process, problem solving and project management. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for practicing team skills and developing communications skills. Building on the first course, this second course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to project management and to the design process in greater depth. Students work in teams on a term length design project. Students will write a series of technical reports and give a team based design project presentation.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

APS502H1 - Financial Engineering

APS502H1 - Financial Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This course will focus on capital budgeting, financial optimization, and project evaluation models and their solution techniques. In particular, linear, non-linear, and integer programming models and their solutions techniques will be studied. The course will give engineering students a background in modern capital budgeting and financial techniques that are relevant in practival engineering and commercial settings.

Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT187H1, MAT188H1, MIE236H1, MIE237H1, or equivalent.
Exclusion: MIE375H1
Total AUs: 17.7 (Fall), 19.2 (Winter), 36.9 (Full Year)

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

CHE112H1 - Physical Chemistry

CHE112H1 - Physical Chemistry
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

A course in physical chemistry. Topics discussed include systems and their states, stoichiometry, the properties of gases, the laws of chemical thermodynamics (calculations involving internal energy, enthalpy, free energy, and entropy), phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, acids and bases, solutions, colligative properties, electrochemistry, and corrosion.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CHE565H1 - Aqueous Process Engineering

CHE565H1 - Aqueous Process Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Application of aqueous chemical processing to mineral, environmental and industrial engineering. The course involves an introduction to the theory of electrolyte solutions, mineral-water interfaces, dissolution and crystallization processes, metal ion separations, and electrochemical processes in aqueous reactive systems. Applications and practice of (1) metal recovery from primary (i.e. ores) and secondary (i.e. recycled) sources by hydrometallurgical means, (2) treatment of aqueous waste streams for environmental protection, and (3) production of high-value-added inorganic materials.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Civil Engineering

CIV100H1 - Mechanics

CIV100H1 - Mechanics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The principles of statics are applied to composition and resolution of forces, moments and couples. The equilibrium states of structures are examined. Throughout, the free body diagram concept is emphasized. Vector algebra is used where it is most useful, and stress blocks are introduced. Shear force diagrams, bending moment diagrams and stress-strain relationships for materials are discussed. Stress and deformation in axially loaded members and flexural members (beams) are also covered.

Exclusion: APS160H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV300H1 - Terrestrial Energy Systems

CIV300H1 - Terrestrial Energy Systems
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Core Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.

Exclusion: ENV346H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV324H1 - Geotechnical Engineering II

CIV324H1 - Geotechnical Engineering II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Building on CME321, more complex aspects of geotechnical analysis and design are considered. Topics include: mineralogy; soil identification and classification; laboratory- and field-based soil index tests; correlations of index test results to engineering properties; vertical stress distribution; soil-foundation interaction; volume change and consolidation of clay and settlement. Shear strength of soil and slope stability analysis are also discussed. Laboratories are held for soil identification and classification, and confined triaxial compression tests of clay and sand.

Prerequisite: CME321H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV420H1 - Construction Engineering

CIV420H1 - Construction Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course considers the engineering aspects of construction including earthmoving, equipment productivity, fleet balancing, formwork design, shoring, hoisting, aggregate production, equipment operating costs, and modular construction. Several construction projects will be reviewed to demonstrate methods and processes. Students will be expected to visit construction sites, so safety boots and hard hats are required.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CIV440H1 - Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment

CIV440H1 - Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor. The process and techniques for assessing and managing the impacts on and risks to humans and the ecosystem associated with engineered facilities, processes and products. Both biophysical and social impacts are addressed. Topics include: environmental assessment processes; environmental legislation; techniques for assessing impacts; engineering risk analysis; health risk assessment; risk management and communication; social impact assessment; cumulative impacts; environmental management systems; the process of considering alternative methods for preventing and controlling impacts; and stakeholder involvement and public participation. Examples are drawn from various engineering activities and facilities such as energy production, chemical production, treatment plants, highways and landfills.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV523H1 - Geotechnical Design

CIV523H1 - Geotechnical Design
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course is built around a transportation project that contains all the essential geotechnical investigation and design elements and illustrates how they all come together on a project. The students will be taken through the entire design process from project initiation to construction. In essence, the project will include a bridge over a river with some property constraints requiring the use of a retaining wall as well as deep and shallow foundations and some groundwater control. The highway will require a soil cut. One section crosses a low-lying swampy area that will require embankment construction over deep soft soils. A short tunnel section is planned beneath a railway that cannot be taken out of service. A pavement design will be required along the entire route as well as materials testing and construction monitoring.

Prerequisite: CME321H1; equivalent or permission of instructor
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CIV580H1 - Engineering and Management of Large Projects

CIV580H1 - Engineering and Management of Large Projects
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This technical elective course will investigate the role of stakeholders in major civil engineering projects; the complexities of managing project stages, multiple stakeholders, and technical challenges, and, social and environmental factors.

Each week includes a different speaker who can address issues related to technical, social, and environmental challenges in the project and how they were overcome.

Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

Civil and Mineral Engineering

CME210H1 - Solid Mechanics I

CME210H1 - Solid Mechanics I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/19.2T/19.2P

An introduction to the mechanics of deformable bodies. General biaxial and triaxial stress conditions in continua are studied, as are elastic stress, strain and deformation relations for members subjected to axial load, bending and shear. Properties of plane sections, moment-area theorems for calculating deflection, and Mohr's circle representation of stress and of moment of inertia are examined, followed by a look at stability.

Prerequisite: CIV100H1, MAT186H1, MAT187H1
Exclusion: CIV210H1
Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

CME259H1 - Technology in Society and the Biosphere I

CME259H1 - Technology in Society and the Biosphere I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Humanities and Social Science Elective
This course teaches future engineers to look beyond their specialized domains of expertise in order to understand how technology functions within human life, society and the biosphere. By providing this context for design and decision-making, students will be enabled to do more than achieve the desired results by also preventing or significantly reducing undesired consequences. A more preventively-oriented mode of practicing engineering will be developed in four areas of application: materials and production, energy, work and cities. The emphasis within these topics will reflect the interests of the class.

Exclusion: ESC203H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CME261H1 - Engineering Mathematics I

CME261H1 - Engineering Mathematics I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course deals with both numerical methods for engineering analysis (solution of linear and non-linear equations, interpolation, numerical integration) and advanced topics in analytical calculus (multiple integrals and vector analysis). Within the numerical methods portion of the course emphasis is placed on problem formulation, solution algorithm design and programming applications. Within the analytical calculus portion emphasis is placed on the mathematical foundations of engineering practice and the interrelationship between analytical and numerical solution methods.

Prerequisite: MAT188H1, MAT187H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CME262H1 - Engineering Mathematics II

CME262H1 - Engineering Mathematics II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course continues the study of numerical and analytical methods for civil engineering analysis. Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations are treated in some detail, followed by numerical solution methods for partial differential equations. The final major topic of the course deals with an introduction to optimization. Emphasis is placed throughout the course on problem formulation, solution algorithm design and programming applications.

Prerequisite: CME261H1
Exclusion: CME362H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CME263H1 - Probability Theory for Civil and Mineral Engineers

CME263H1 - Probability Theory for Civil and Mineral Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Probability theory as the study of random phenomena in Civil and Mineral Engineering systems, including the definition of probability, conditional probability, Bayes' theorem in discrete and continuous sample spaces. Common single and multivariate distributions. Mathematical expectation including mean and variance. Independence. An introduction to realizations of probability models and parameter estimation.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CME270H1 - Fluid Mechanics I

CME270H1 - Fluid Mechanics I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Fluid and flow characteristics, applications, dimensions and units. Fluid statics. One-dimensional flow including conservation of mass, energy and momentum. Introduction to dimensional analysis and similitude, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layer concept, and flow about immersed objects. Calculation of flow in closed conduits and open channels.

Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

CME321H1 - Geotechnical Engineering I

CME321H1 - Geotechnical Engineering I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

An introduction to elements of geotechnical analysis and design. Basic site investigation techniques and quantitative descriptions of soil properties and behaviour. Permeability, seepage analysis, and internal stability of granular soil; granular filter design for internal hydraulic stability. Compaction of granular soil; engineered fills for earth dams, road bases, and backfills. Soil shear strength at constant volume; ultimate limit state design of retaining walls, shallow footings, natural slopes and constructed embankments. Groundwater flow analysis and slope stability analysis using commercial software. Physical laboratories for basic soil identification, model groundwater flow analysis, direct shear strength tests, and reinforced earth models.

Prerequisite: CME270H1, CME210H1
Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

CME358H1 - Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals)

CME358H1 - Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals)
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8T

This two-week August field camp provides students with the opportunity to further their understanding of the vital interactions between the natural and the built environments. Through fieldwork, students gain hands-on experience in the use of various field instruments used by Civil and Mineral Engineers. The essentials of land surveying and the use of surveying instruments including Global Positioning Systems are taught as students carry out a series of field exercises that include route surveys, topographic surveys and construction surveys. Survey calculations, sources of error, corrections and adjustments are also introduced. In order to better understand our impact on the natural environment, students also perform several additional exercises. These may include the measurement of river flows, remote sensing of soil and rock, remediation of a borrow pit, and the evaluation of the renewable energy potential of the wind and solar radiation. Note: This course requires payment of an extra fee for room and board.

Total AUs: 4.9 (Fall), 5.3 (Winter), 10.1 (Full Year)

CME368H1 - Engineering Economics and Decision Making

CME368H1 - Engineering Economics and Decision Making
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The incorporation of economic and non-monetary considerations for making decision about public and private sector engineering systems in urban and other contexts. Topics include rational decision making; cost concepts; time value of money and engineering economics; microeconomic concepts; treatment of risk and uncertainty; and public project evaluation techniques incorporating social and environmental impacts including benefit cost analysis and multi-objective analysis.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CME499H1 - Individual Project

CME499H1 - Individual Project
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4T

Individual Projects are arranged between the student and a supervising faculty member. The individual project can have either a design project focus or a research focus. If the focus is on design then the design project can be either motivated by the CIV498H1 Group Design Project and MIN466 Mineral Project Design experience, or it can be entirely new. The student's work must culminate in a final design report or a thesis, as well as an oral presentation. The grading of both the final written submission as well as the oral presentation is carried out by the supervising faculty member. The Individual Project may be undertaken only once, either in the Fall (F) or Winter (S) Session (0.5 weight), or as a full year (Y) course (1.0 weight).

Total AUs: 17.7 (Fall), 19.2 (Winter), 36.9 (Full Year)

CME499Y1 - Individual Project

CME499Y1 - Individual Project
Credit Value: 1.00
Hours: 38.4T

Individual Projects are arranged between the student and a supervising faculty member. The individual project can have either a design project focus or a research focus. If the focus is on design then the design project can be either motivated by the CIV498H1">CIV498H1 Group Design Project experience, or it can be entirely new. The student's work must culminate in a final design report or a thesis, as well as an oral presentation. The grading of both the final written submission as well as the oral presentation is carried out by the supervising faculty member. The Individual Project may be undertaken in either the Fall (F) or Winter (S) Session, but not both (i.e., the Individual Project carries a maximum weight of 0.5; it cannot be made into a full year course)

Total AUs: 17.7 (Fall), 19.2 (Winter), 36.9 (Full Year)

CME500H1 - Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage

CME500H1 - Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Geochemistry of acid rock / acid mine drainage (ARD/AMD) which covers the role of bacteria in generating this global mining pollution issue and how mines currently treat and attempt to prevent it. An introduction to the underlying chemical reactions involved, the role of microbes in these processes and the mitigation and treatment strategies currently available.

* Course offering pending Faculty Council approval for 2018-19 academic year.

Prerequisite: APS110H1/CHE112H1 or equivalent
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

CME525H1 - Tunneling and Urban Excavation

CME525H1 - Tunneling and Urban Excavation
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Introduces fundamental concepts of underground tunneling and its impact on surrounding urban environment. Topics: role of geology on the choice of tunneling methodology; classical and mechanized tunneling excavation methods; interaction between tunnel and surrounding structures; tunnel support methodologies; innovation and current research in tunneling and underground construction.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Geography

GGR252H1 - Marketing Geography

GGR252H1 - Marketing Geography
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 24L/4T

Geography matters in the success of both public and private sector organizations. Using mostly retail examples contemporary location problems are addressed. The geographies of demand and supply are analyzed and trade area and site selection techniques are applied. The relevance of the planning context and utility of geovisualization techniques such as GIS are also briefly considered.

Exclusion: GGR252H5
Total AUs: 27.6 (Fall), 27.6 (Winter), 55.2 (Full Year)

Mathematics

MAT186H1 - Calculus I

MAT186H1 - Calculus I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Topics include: limits and continuity; differentiation; applications of the derivative - related rates problems, curve sketching, optimization problems, L'Hopital's rule; definite and indefinite integrals; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications of integration in geometry, mechanics and other engineering problems.

Exclusion: APS162H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MAT187H1 - Calculus II

MAT187H1 - Calculus II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Topics include: techniques of integration, an introduction to mathematical modeling with differential equations, infinite sequences and series, Taylor series, parametric and polar curves, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, and application to mechanics and other engineering problems.

Prerequisite: APS162H1/MAT186H1
Exclusion: APS163H1/MAT197H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MAT188H1 - Linear Algebra

MAT188H1 - Linear Algebra
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course covers systems of linear equations and Gaussian elimination, applications; vectors in Rn, independent sets and spanning sets; linear transformations, matrices, inverses; subspaces in Rn, basis and dimension; determinants; eigenvalues and diagonalization; systems of differential equations; dot products and orthogonal sets in Rn; projections and the Gram-Schmidt process; diagonalizing symmetric matrices; least squares approximation. Includes an introduction to numeric computation in a weekly laboratory.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

Mineral Engineering

MIN120H1 - Insight into Mineral Engineering

MIN120H1 - Insight into Mineral Engineering
Hours: 51.2L/12.8T

A comprehensive introduction to the global minerals industry using international regulatory requirements as a thematic structure. Engineering applications together with current and emerging issues are emphasized throughout. Principal topics include: mineral resources in the economy; stakeholder concerns and responsible mining; mineral exploration; surface and sub‑surface mine development and operation; fundamentals of mineral processing; mineral industry finance.

Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.60 (Winter), 110.70 (Full Year)

MIN191H1 - Introduction to Mineral Engineering

MIN191H1 - Introduction to Mineral Engineering
Credit Value: 0.15
Hours: 12.8L

This is a seminar series that will introduce students to the community, upper-year experience, and core fields of Mineral Engineering. Seminar presenters will represent the major areas in Mineral Engineering and will also be drawn from an array of groups, including students, staff, faculty, and alumni. The format will vary and may include application examples, case studies, career opportunities, and research talks. The purpose of the seminar series is to provide first year students with some understanding of the various options within the Department to enable them to make educated choices as they progress through the program. This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis.

Total AUs: 11.8 (Fall), 12.8 (Winter), 24.6 (Full Year)

MIN201H1 - Mineral Engineering Field Excursion

MIN201H1 - Mineral Engineering Field Excursion
Credit Value: 0.20

A field-based course introducing students to mineral engineering activities in open pit and underground mines, and mineral processing plants. The course will provide essential contextual experience for later courses in years 2 to 4 of the program, as well as highlight the key role of mineral engineers in developing safe, economical, and sustainable solutions for extracting and processing natural mineral resources. A mine operation in Ontario will be visited which, depending on the site location, will require one or two overnight stays in the nearest town/city. The mine operation will provide all personal protective equipment (PPE) and will ensure that students receive comprehensive safety induction training before entering the operation. The course will run in the first week of September immediately following Labour Day.

Prerequisite: n/a
Corequisite: n/a
Exclusion: n/a
Recommended Preparation: n/a
Enrolment Limits: n/a
Total AUs: 0 (Fall), 0 (Winter), 0 (Full Year)

MIN250H1 - Surface Mining

MIN250H1 - Surface Mining
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Operational aspects of open pit mine design and mine planning. Topics will include: open pit design and pit optimization; long term and short term planning considerations; materials handling; equipment selection and optimization; industrial minerals production; mine safety and mine regulations; mining and the environment; mine personnel organization; ethics and professional issues. Pit dewatering, the location and stability of waste dumps and an examination of equipment cost and production statistics are also included.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN301H1 - Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource Estimation

MIN301H1 - Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource Estimation
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Introduction to Mineral Resource and Mineral Reserve Estimation is an advanced level course that focuses on the stages of a mineral resource and mineral reserve estimation program from assembling the database through to reporting under industry guidelines. Major course topics include: statistical analysis of sampling data, geologic interpretation and deposit models; mineral resources estimation approaches and methods, mineral reserve estimation, classification of resources and reserves, and reporting under regulatory standards and industry guidelines for professional practice.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN320H1 - Explosives and Fragmentation in Mining

MIN320H1 - Explosives and Fragmentation in Mining
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Efficient drilling and blasting is important to successful mining in rock formations. This course studies the planning, design, and economics of rock blasting for a full range of surface and underground, mining and construction projects. Emphasis will be on optimization of fragmentation using blast geometry and those variables available to the field engineer. This course covers the selection of modern industrial explosives, their history, physical properties, and safe handling, including an introduction to the theory of detonation, and rock response. Safety procedures in storage and transportation will be studied along with the monitoring and control of blast side effects. A field trip is associated with this course.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN329H1 - Engineering Rock Mechanics

MIN329H1 - Engineering Rock Mechanics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of rock mechanics and their application to rock engineering. The following rock mechanics topics are covered: stress and strain; in situ stress; intact rock strength; discontinuity geometry, strength and stiffness; rock mass behavious; anisotropy, heterogeneity and the size effect; rock mass classifcation schemes. Rock engineering topics include: rock excavation; rock stabilisation; instability mechanisms in foundationas and slopes; rock slope design methods; underground openings in discontinuous and continuous rocks; rock-support interaction; synopsis of numerical methods. Associated laboratory sessions involve stress measurement, core logging, compressive strength determination and index testing.

Exclusion: CIV529H1
Total AUs: 59 (Fall), 64 (Winter), 123 (Full Year)

MIN330H1 - Mining Environmental Management

MIN330H1 - Mining Environmental Management
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course provides an overview of the major aspects of mining environmental management from exploration, through design and development of the property, into operation, and final closure implementation. An applied approach is taken utilizing case studies and examples where possible. Participation and discussion is an integral part of the course. Topics include sustainable development, environmental impacts, designing for mitigation, environmental management systems and reclamation.

Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN350H1 - Mineral Economics

MIN350H1 - Mineral Economics
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Course covers the evaluation of mineral projects, mining operations, and mining companies. Topics will include: discounted cash flow techniques including net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), net asset value (NAV); feasibility studies and due diligence reports; reserves and resources, data sources; metal prices and markets; cash flow modeling including revenue calculations, capital and operating costs, taxes, depreciation, inflation; risk and risk assessment, discount rates, red flags, checklists; financing. Guest lectures will provide industry insights into financing, fund raising, consulting, project control, and evaluation. There are two assignments: review of an annual report; due diligence report and net asset value calculation.

Prerequisite: CIV368H1/CME368H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN351H1 - Underground Mining

MIN351H1 - Underground Mining
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Operational aspects of underground mine design and mine planning. Topics will include: underground mining methods for hard and soft rock; shaft sinking, hoisting and materials handling; equipment selection and optimization; mine safety and mine regulations; mine personnel organization; ethics and professional issues. Development and production costs associated with mining are an inherent aspect of this course.

Exclusion: MIN350H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN400H1 - Geology Field Camp for Engineers

MIN400H1 - Geology Field Camp for Engineers
Credit Value: 0.50

At Geology Field Camp, students will learn to incorporate geological observations into their engineering data sets. The course will focus on the recognition of rock types in the field, mapping of geological structures related to mineralization of potential economic importance, and field measurement techniques for obtaining rock engineering data. Students will learn how to make geological observations that are of critical importance to their success as mineral engineers, and to foster a sense of excitement and curiosity about the rocks that form the physical environment within which they will work as professionals. The course will be taught in the Sudbury region where there are several operating mines, numerous excellent field exposures of rocks related to the formation of the impact-related Sudbury structure, inexpensive accommodations, as well as unrelated older rock sequences typical of Archean greenstone belts where much of Canada's mineral exploration takes place. Students attend the two week Geology Field Camp prior to the start of Fourth Year Fall Session.

Prerequisite: GLG207H1, GLG345H1, MIN429H1
Total AUs: 45.7 (Fall), 49.6 (Winter), 95.3 (Full Year)

MIN466H1 - Mineral Project Design I

MIN466H1 - Mineral Project Design I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/25.6P

Mineral Project Design is a two-part capstone course that draws on all course materials developed in the first three years of the Mineral Engineering Curriculum. The course will culminate in the design of a mining or civil rock engineering project. In the first half of the course (F) students perform individual detailed case history analyses. Additional instruction in technical aspects of communication is provided during both semesters (preparing and writing technical reports, industry research and analysis, presentation skills, as well as other technical elements as required). These skills will form a foundation for students to use in industry. Critical non-technical aspects of rock engineering projects will also be examined, and guest speakers will present on specialized topics such as: cultural and social effects of rock engineering projects on communities and the environment; economic planning and impact; ethical considerations; aboriginal land claims, etc.. The social license to operate will be emphasized. Students will receive a final grade at the end of each term course, but both courses must be taken in sequence. (MIN 467H1 S cannot be taken without successful completion of MIN 466H1 F)

Prerequisite: MIN429H1, MIN350H1
Total AUs: 45.7 (Fall), 49.6 (Winter), 95.3 (Full Year)

MIN467H1 - Mineral Project Design II

MIN467H1 - Mineral Project Design II
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 12.8L/12.8T/51.2P

Mineral Project Design is a two-part capstone course that draws on all course materials developed in the first three years of the Mineral Engineering Curriculum. Part II (S) focuses on the design of a mining or civil rock engineering project. Students will be grouped into teams and provided with one or more data sets and a design problem to solve. The end product is a major engineering design report and oral presentation (including several interim reports and presentations). Technical aspects will serve to examine a "cradle to grave" view of a project, from initial planning through to final closure and site remediation. The course will include an intensive two-day Professional Supervisors Short Course. Topics include: Discovering a commonality among supervisors and their key role in maintaining standards. The importance of sharing information and expectations about costs, production goals and business objectives are explored in the context of motivation. The necessity of successful communication skills and techniques are discussed and demonstrated to achieve behaviours on the job, producing consistent results. A reliable methodology for handling difficult situations is provided. The fundamental rationale for safety and loss control is presented as well as a relevant perspective on management structure. A workable code of conduct that is a guide to professional behaviour is developed. Students will receive a final grade at the end of each term course, but both courses must be taken in sequence (MIN 467H1 S cannot be taken without successful completion of MIN 466H1 F)

Prerequisite: MIN466H1
Total AUs: 45.7 (Fall), 49.6 (Winter), 95.3 (Full Year)

MIN470H1 - Ventilation and Occupational Health

MIN470H1 - Ventilation and Occupational Health
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Hydraulics of air flow through underground openings is studied leading to mine ventilation design calculations and ventilation network analysis. Related topics discussed in the course include: statutory regulations and engineering design criteria; application and selection of ventilation fans; auxiliary fan design; air conditioning (heating and cooling); dust and fume control; ventilation economics. Health hazards related to mine gasses, dust and radiation along with relevant statutory requirements are reviewed. Air quality and quantity measurement and survey techniques are presented.

Prerequisite: CIV270H1/CME270H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN511H1 - Integrated Mine Waste Engineering

MIN511H1 - Integrated Mine Waste Engineering
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The engineering design of conventional mine waste management systems, including tailings ponds, rock dumps, and underground mine backfill systems, is considered first. Emerging trends in integrated mine waste management systems, including paste stacking and "paste rock" on surface, and cemented paste backfill forunderground mining will then be covered. Engineering case studies will be used throughout, and each case study will be evaluated in terms of how the mine waste systems used contribute to the economic and environmental sustainability of the mining operation.

Prerequisite: CME321H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

MIN565H1 - Design and Support of Underground Mine Excavations

MIN565H1 - Design and Support of Underground Mine Excavations
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Geomechanical issues concerning the design of underground openings in hard rock are covered in the course: ground support [i.e. rock mass reinforcement] design, the dimensioning and sequencing of underground excavations and rock pillar design in hard rock applications. A review of modern concepts concerning rock and rock mass failure modes with application to support design is given. Both static and dynamic [rockburst] support design issues are addresses. Lastly instrumentation and monitoring techniques and backfill design and behaviour are also covered. Design issues are illustrated through the use of numerous field case studies .

Prerequisite: MIN429H1/CIV529H1
Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

Materials Science and Engineering

MSE202H1 - Thermodynamics I

MSE202H1 - Thermodynamics I
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The three laws of thermodynamics, Heat capacity theory and Debye's law. Calculations of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of pure materials and reactions. Reversible and irreversible processes. Gibbs free energy, chemical equilibria, and phase rule. Introduction of Ellingham, Pourbaix, and pre-dominance area diagrams. Treatment of ideal and non-ideal solutions with the introduction of the concept of activity and activity coefficient. Binary and ternary phase diagrams and their applications to materials processing and materials properties. Thermodynamics of electrochemical systems.

Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

MSE301H1 - Mineral Processing

MSE301H1 - Mineral Processing
Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Introduction to the theory and practice of mineral beneficiation. Topics covered include comminution, sizing, froth flotation, gravity separation, magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, dewatering and tailings management. The course also covers relevant aspects of sampling, particle size measurement, metallurgical accounting, material balances, surface chemistry and the movement of solid particles in liquid media. Open to 3rd and 4th year Minerals, Materials, and Chemical Engineering students, or with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: MIN225H1 or MSE244H1
Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

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