Certificate Programs


 

CERTIFICATE IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ENGINEERING (AECERAIEN)

CERTIFICATE IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ENGINEERING (AECERAIEN)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine learning (ML) have exploded in importance in recent years and garnered attention in a wide variety of application areas, including computer vision (e.g. image recognition), game playing (e.g. AlphaGo), autonomous driving, speech recognition, customer preference elicitation, bioinformatics (e.g. gene analysis) and others. While the topics may appear primarily to reside in the disciplines of computer engineering and computer science, the topics of AI and ML now apply to all disciplines of engineering, such as projection of future road-traffic patterns, applications in industrial automation and robotic control, or the use of AI/ML drug discovery, to name just a few examples.

All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible to participate in this certificate EXCEPT students in the Engineering Science Machine Intelligence Major and the Robotics Major.

The requirements for the Certificate in Artificial Intelligence Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Required Course:          
APS360H1: Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning F/S 3 - 1 0.50
One of:          
ECE345H1: Algorithms and Data Structures F/S 3 - 2 0.50
ECE358H1: Foundations of Computing F 3 - 1 0.50
CSC263H1: Data Structures and Analysis F/S 2 - 1 0.50
MIE245H1: Data Structures and Algorithms S 3 1 1 0.50
One of:          
CSC311H1: Introduction to Machine Learning S 2 - 1 0.50
CSC384H1: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence F/S 2 - 1 0.50
ECE421H1: Introduction to Machine Learning S 3 - 2 0.50
MIE369H1: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence S 3 2 - 0.50
MIE424H1: Optimization in Machine Learning S 3 1 1 0.50
ROB311H1: Artificial Intelligence S 3 - 1 0.50
ROB313H1: Introduction to Learning from Data S 3 - 2 0.50

Engineering Science students enrolled in the Robotics Major are not eligible for the AI Engineering Certificate due to overlapping core course requirements.

CERTIFICATE IN COMMUNICATION (AECERCOM)

CERTIFICATE IN COMMUNICATION (AECERCOM)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

This certificate creates an opportunity for interested students to gain specialized expertise and recognition for a personal and professional commitment to enhanced communication skills. With the certificate, participating students can establish communication expertise through courses that expand on communication practices in contexts beyond engineering, deepen theoretical understanding of communication, and facilitate professional development in writing, oral communication, and critical thinking.

Students in all disciplines are eligible to participate in this Certificate.

Students pursuing the Certificate in Communication must successfully complete a minimum of 3 courses from the list outlined below:

    Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
TEP281H1: Language and Meaning S 4 - - 0.50
TEP320H1: Representing Science on Stage F 2 - 2 0.50
TEP321H1: Introduction to Science Communication F 2 - 2 0.50
TEP322H1: Language and Power S 2 - 2 0.50
TEP323H1: Writing Lab F 2 - 2 0.50
TEP324H1: Engineering and Social Justice S 2 - 2 0.50
TEP325H1: Engineering and Science in the Arts F 2 - 2 0.50
TEP326H1: Special Topics in Creative Writing F/S 2 - 2 0.50
TEP445H1: The Power of Story: Discovering Your Leadership Narrative F 2 - 1 0.50
TEP449H1: Intercultural Communication and Leadership F 2 - 2 0.50
WRR304H1: The Illusion and Reality of Evidence S - - - 0.50
WRR305H1: Word and Image in Modern Writing S - - - 0.50
WRR310H1: Stylistic Editing and Copy Editing F - - - 0.50

NOTE:

  • Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.
  • If a student is pursuing both the Communication Certificate and another Minor or Certificate that lists the course, the courses listed above can only be counted towards one certificate or minor, not both.

CERTIFICATE IN ENGINEERING BUSINESS (AECERBUS)

CERTIFICATE IN ENGINEERING BUSINESS (AECERBUS)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

The Undergraduate Engineering Business Certificate is a collaborative effort across the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and the Rotman School of Management and is open to Engineering students interested in learning more about the business dimension of engineering, from finance and economics to management and leadership. Courses include engineering economics, with a choices of accounting and finance, marketing and strategy, management and organizational behaviour, or entrepreneurship. All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible for this certificate program.

The requirements of the Certificate in Engineering Business in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following requirements:

Economics Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Choose one of:          
CHE249H1: Engineering Economic Analysis F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE374H1: Economic Analysis and Decision Making F 3 - 1 0.50
CME368H1: Engineering Economics and Decision Making F 3 - 1 0.50
ECE472H1: Engineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship F/S 3 - 2 0.50
MIE258H1: Engineering Economics and Accounting F 3 - 1 0.50

Electives   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Choose two of :          
JRE300H1: Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance F/S 3 - 1 0.50
JRE410H1: Markets and Competitive Strategy F/S 2 2 - 0.50
JRE420H1: People Management and Organizational Behaviour F/S 3 - 1 0.50
One choice above can be replaced by one of the following:          
CHE488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers S 3 - 2 0.50
CIV488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers S 3 - 2 0.50
ECE488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers F 3 - 2 0.50
MIE488H1: Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers F 3 - 2 0.50

NOTE:

Students may only receive credit on their transcript for one of the Engineering Business Certificate, the Entrepreneurship Certificate, or the Engineering Business Minor.

CERTIFICATE IN ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP (AECERLEAD)

CERTIFICATE IN ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP (AECERLEAD)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

Leadership education is about learning how to effectively handle complex, human challenges that often mean the difference between success and failure. Engineers are taught to think analytically and systematically. Leadership skills build on these strengths to make you a more effective engineer. More than just important, they are critical. This certificate recognizes a demonstrated focus in leadership courses provided jointly through the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and the Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering. Students in all disciplines are eligible to participate in this Certificate.

Students pursuing the Certificate in Engineering Leadership must successfully complete a minimum of 3 courses from the list outlined below:

Courses Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Choose 3 of the following:
TEP322H1: Language and Power S 2 - 2 0.50
TEP343H1: Engineering Leadership F/S 1 2 - 0.50
TEP442H1: Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership S 3 - - 0.50
TEP444H1: Positive Psychology for Engineers F 3 - - 0.50
TEP445H1: The Power of Story: Discovering Your Leadership Narrative F 2 - 1 0.50
TEP447H1: The Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in Engineering S 3 - - 0.50
TEP448H1: System Mapping S 2 - 2 0.50
TEP449H1: Intercultural Communication and Leadership F 2 - 2 0.50

NOTE:

  • Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.
  • If a student is pursuing both the Engineering Leadership Certificate and another Minor or Certificate that lists the course, the courses listed above can only be counted towards one certificate or minor, not both.

CERTIFICATE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP, INNOVATION AND SMALL BUSINESS (AECERENTR)

CERTIFICATE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP, INNOVATION AND SMALL BUSINESS (AECERENTR)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit, can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

Since the dawn of the industrial revolution, engineers have been among the most successful entrepreneurs, and this is especially true in today’s global economy. The enormous growth of the e-Economy has enabled many young people to be successful even earlier than the previous generation did. Wealth creation is a legitimate aspiration today and many of you will be successful in this endeavor. Furthermore, strategic uses of technology in all sorts of businesses make the difference between success and failure for these firms. The entrepreneurial spirit together with drive and persistency are requirements for success. Also, to participate effectively in this global economy, large and medium sized corporations are desperately seeking entrepreneurs, entrepreneurial individuals who prefer to work inside a larger firm rather than to start or run their own business. Owning a business has many advantages. Entrepreneurs can control their own lives, structure their own progress, be accountable for their own success and can see the fruit of their labours in the wealth they create. After all, engineers are the most capable people to be in the forefront of this drive which will depend on the online e-Business environment fostered by the Internet and the Web in the new millennium. The development of these talents is addressed in a set of two courses but be forewarned that these courses require a substantial effort on the part of the student and the instructors. They are unusual in that, to be accepted into them, a student has to possess some of the prerequisite personality traits and some unique abilities required to become a successful entrepreneur.

Prior to being accepted into TEP234H1, a short test is offered to those who believe that they have the drive and talents to start their own business. TEP234H1 is available in the Fall semester in any but the first year of study. TEP432H1 is offered in the Winter and can be taken in the same or a later year. The courses are sequential and the first is the prerequisite of the second.

The following are the required certificate courses:

Required Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
TEP234H1: Entrepreneurship and Small Business F 4 - 1 0.50
TEP432H1: Entrepreneurship and Business Management S 4 - 1 0.50

Economics Elective Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Choose one of:
CHE249H1: Engineering Economic Analysis F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE374H1: Economic Analysis and Decision Making F 3 - 1 0.50
CME368H1: Engineering Economics and Decision Making F 3 - 1 0.50
ECE472H1: Engineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship F/S 3 - 2 0.50
MIE258H1: Engineering Economics and Accounting F 3 - 1 0.50

NOTE:

Students may only receive credit on their transcript for one of the Engineering Business Certificate or the Entrepreneurship Certificate, or the Engineering Business Minor.

CERTIFICATE IN FORENSIC ENGINEERING (AECERFORE)

CERTIFICATE IN FORENSIC ENGINEERING (AECERFORE)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

The Certificate in Forensic Engineering provides a unique opportunity to gain recognition for a personal and professional commitment to enhanced engineering investigation skills. Forensic engineering has traditionally been associated with the investigation of artifacts that fail or do not operate/function as intended, causing personal injury and/or monetary loss, the consequences of which are normally dealt with in a court of law. Forensic engineering training, however, goes well beyond the expert witness in the courtroom. Forensic engineering skills are highly valuable in other activities such as: assessment of deterioration in infrastructure, product quality and procedural practice improvement as a result of investigations, direct impact on improving engineering design practices and revision of codes/standards to improve public safety.

Students in all disciplines are eligible to participate in this Certificate.

Students pursuing the Certificate in Forensic Engineering must successfully complete a minimum of 3 courses as follows:

Courses Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
MSE431H1: Forensic Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
Two of:
APS440H1: Making Sense of Accidents S 3 1 - 0.50
CHE441H1: Engineering Materials F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE467H1: Environmental Engineering F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE561H1: Risk Based Safety Management S 3 - 1 0.50
CIV440H1: Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment S 3 - 1 0.50
CIV510H1: Solid Mechanics II S 3 - 2 0.50
MIE304H1: Introduction to Quality Control S 3 1 2 0.50
MIE320H1: Mechanics of Solids II S 3 1.50 2 0.50
MIE364H1: Quality Control and Improvement S 3 1 2 0.50
MIE442H1: Machine Design F 3 1.50 3 0.50
MIE469H1: Reliability and Maintainability Engineering S 3 - 2 0.50
MSE401H1: Materials Information in Design F 3 - - 0.50
MSE415H1: Environmental Degradation of Materials F 3 - - 0.50
MSE419H1: Fracture and Failure Analysis F 3 - 1 0.50

NOTE:

  • Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.
  • If a student is pursuing both the Forensic Engineering Certificate and a Minor that lists the course, the courses listed above can only be counted towards either the certificate or the minor, not both

CERTIFICATE IN GLOBAL ENGINEERING (U of T Global Scholar) (AECERGLOB)

CERTIFICATE IN GLOBAL ENGINEERING (U of T Global Scholar) (AECERGLOB)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

The Undergraduate Certificate in Global Engineering is open to Engineering students interested in developing their knowledge of global issues and how engineers can influence and improve conditions around the world. The courses focus on a variety of concepts such as effects of emerging and appropriate technologies in both developed and developing economies, global energy systems, innovative finance techniques, current theories in international development and foreign aid. All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible to participate in this certificate. Students who complete the requirements of the Certificate in Global Engineering are considered University of Toronto Global Scholars.

The requirements for the Certificate in Global Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Choose two of:          
APS299Y0: Summer Research Abroad Y - 7 - 1.00
APS510H1: Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems F 3 - 1 0.50
APS530H1: Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development S 3 - - 0.50
APS420H1: Technology, Engineering and Global Development S 3 - - 0.50
Global Engineering themed capstone (APS490Y, ECE496Y, MIE490Y, CIV498H) as approved by the Director of the Centre for Global Engineering F/S/Y       0.00
Choose one of:          
APS330H1: Interdisciplinary Studies for Sustainability & Innovation W 3 - - 0.50
ANT204H1 (formerly ANT204Y1): Anthropology of the Contemporary World F - - - 0.50
ENV333H1: Ecological Worldviews F - - - 0.50
GGR112H1: Geographies of Globalization, Development and Inequality F - - - 0.50
JGU216H1: Globalization and Urban Change S - - - 0.50
POL201H1: Politics of Development Y - - - 0.50
POL208H1: Introduction to International Relations Y - - - 0.50
CDN268H1 (formerly UNI268H1): Canada and Globalization S - - - 0.50

NOTE:

If a student is pursuing both the Certificate in Global Engineering and either the Sustainable Energy Minor or the Environmental Engineering Minor, the courses listed above can only be counted towards either the certificate or the minor, not both, unless they taken as Extra credits or not being counted towards degree requirements.

CERTIFICATE IN MINERAL RESOURCES (AECERMINR)

CERTIFICATE IN MINERAL RESOURCES (AECERMINR)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

The mineral resources sector encompasses many disciplines, and covers endeavours that range from mineral exploration and resource estimation, through mine planning, design and operation, and on to mining finance. Environment protection is foremost in all these, and they all operate under strict international legislative frameworks. The Mineral Resources Certificate provides exposure to the sector for interested candidates, and is arranged in themes to suit a student’s specific area of interest.

Students in all disciplines except the Lassonde Mineral Engineering Program are eligible to participate in this Certificate.

All courses indicated below are technical courses, not CS or HSS. Students may take these as either a Free Elective or as a Technical Elective Substitution with the approval of their home department.

Students will receive the Mineral Resources Certificate upon completion of 3 courses as outlined below:

Certificate Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
Core Requirement:          
MIN120H1: Insight into Mineral Engineering S 3 2 1 0.50
           
Two courses from one of the following themes:          
Theme 1: Mine planning and design          
MIN250H1: Surface Mining S 3 - 1 0.50
MIN351H1: Underground Mining S 3 - 1 0.50
           
Theme 2: Mineral Resources and Economics          
MIN301H1: Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource Estimation F 3 - 1 0.50
MIN350H1: Mineral Economics S 3 - 1 0.50
           
Theme 3: Mining and the Environment          
MIN250H1: Surface Mining S 3 - 1 0.50
MIN330H1: Mining Environmental Management S 3 - 1 0.50
           
Theme 4: Assessment & Management of Mineral Resources          
MIN301H1: Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource Estimation F 3 - 1 0.50
MIN330H1: Mining Environmental Management S 3 - 1 0.50

Notes:

  • Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.
  • Students must secure approval from their home department before selecting any elective outside their departmental approved list.

CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC TECHNOLOGY (AECERMUST)

CERTIFICATE IN MUSIC TECHNOLOGY (AECERMUST)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

This certificate was designed for Engineering undergraduates interested in exploring the intersection between music, technology and engineering. This certificate is open to any student completing an undergraduate degree in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.

Through our partnership with the Faculty of Music, we are able to provide access to a number of technical courses normally only open to their students.

Due to the nature of these courses and the requirements set by the CEAB, there are courses within this program that are only eligible for Free Elective (FE) or Extra course status (EXT). Thus students wishing to pursue this minor must be prepared to be taking on course work above and beyond their degree requirements. ECE446 and Technical courses from the Faculty of Music may be requested as Technical Elective Substitutions (TES) for a student's degree program, subject to the approval of the student's home department.

Students pursuing the Certificate in Music Technology must successfully complete a minimum of 3 courses (1.5 FCE) as follows:

Core Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
TMU111H1: Introduction to Computer Applications in Music F/S/Y - - - 0.00
One of:          
ECE446H1: Sensory Communication F 3 1.50 - 0.50
TMU130H1: Music Theory I F/S - - - 0.50

Electives   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
One of:          
HMU111H1: Introduction to Music & Society F/S - - - 0.50
MUS110H1: Introduction to Music History & Culture F/S - - - 0.50
MUS111H1: Historical Survey of Western Music F/S - - - 0.50
MUS200H1: Music of the World's Peoples F/S - - - 0.50
MUS204H1: The Age of Bach and Handel F/S - - - 0.50
MUS209H1: Performing Arts of South Asia F/S - - - 0.50
MUS211H1: The World of Popular Music F/S - - - 0.50
MUS212H1: Music, Sound & Power in the Middle East F/S - - - 0.50
MUS240H1: Heavy Music F/S - - - 0.50
MUS302H1: Symphony F/S - - - 0.50
MUS306H1: Popular Music in North America F/S - - - 0.50
MUS308H1: Handel F/S - - - 0.50
MUS335H1: A Social History of the Piano F/S - - - 0.50
TMU131H1: Music Theory 2 F/S - - - 0.50
TMU313H1: Introduction to Music Recording F/S - - - 0.50
TMU319H1: Electroacoustic Music I (Not offered in 2023-2024) F/S - - - 0.50
TMU330H1: Live Coding: Digital Audio in Real Time (Not offered in 2023-2024) F/S - - - 0.50
TMU406H1: Max/MSP F/S - - - 0.50

Note: Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.

Note on Electives: The Faculty of Music updates the list of MUS courses offered each year. A final list of MUS electives eligible for the academic year will be posted on the Minors web site in May.

CERTIFICATE IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING (AECERNUC)

CERTIFICATE IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING (AECERNUC)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

Nuclear energy constitutes an important component of the energy mix in most national energy strategies, and its proportion will likely increase in response to growing challenges related to fossil-driven climate change. Modular nuclear systems power space craft and remote sites on earth. Future nuclear power systems will address current concerns regarding safety and the environment, and significant breakthroughs are likely in fusion technology. This certificate provides recognition for an interdisciplinary focus on nuclear systems. Students in all disciplines are eligible to participate in this Certificate.

The requirements for the Certificate in Nuclear Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

Courses Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
CHE566H1: Elements of Nuclear Engineering F 3 - 2 0.50
Choose two of:
AER507H1: Introduction to Fusion Energy F 3 - 1 0.50
CHE568H1: Nuclear Engineering S 3 - 1 0.50
MIE407H1: Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design F 3 - 2 0.50
* MIE408H1: * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors S 3 - 2 0.50

NOTE:

  • Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.
  • Students must secure approval from their home department before selecting any elective outside their departmental approved list.
  • If a student is pursuing both the Nuclear Engineering Certificate and the Sustainable Energy Minor, the courses listed above can only be counted towards either the certificate or the minor, not both.

CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENGINEERING (AECERPHEN)

CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENGINEERING (AECERPHEN)

The connection between engineering and public health has a long history. Innovation in areas such as clean drinking water and sanitation enabled the development of today’s cities. Many shared challenges remain in relation to home and occupational exposures and the impact of environmental pollution on health. Most recently, the COVID-19 pandemic has further increased interest in public health, from the design and production of new personal protective equipment, optimization of building systems, development of new disinfecting tools and modeling viral transmission. Moreover, transformation of global infrastructure over the coming decade to mitigate climate change will increasingly require engineers who are able to recognise and leverage public health connections.



All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible to participate in this certificate program. Students who complete the requirements of the Certificate will receive a notation on their transcript upon graduation.


The requirements for the Certificate are the successful completion of the following courses:

  1. APS470H1 – Engineering and Public Health
  2. One Public Health elective from the Faculty of Arts & Science:
  • HST209H1 - Introduction to Health: Determinants of Health & Health Care
  • HST211H1 – Health Policy in Canada
  • HST330H1 - Population Health
  • GGR433H1 – Built Environment and Health
  • GGR434H1 – Building Community Resilience
  • One Public-health related Engineering elective:
    • CHE416H1 – Chemical Engineering in Human Health
    • CHE561H1 – Risk-Based Safety Management
    • CHE460H1 – Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment
    • CIV536H1 – Urban Activities, Air Pollution and Health
    • CIV577H1 – Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities
    • CIV550H1 – Water Resources Engineering
    • MIE368H1 – Analytics in Action
    • MIE542H1 – Human Factors Integration
    • MIE561H1 – Healthcare Systems
    Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
    Fall Courses          
    APS470H1 – Engineering and Public Health F 3   1 0.5
    CIV536H1 – Urban Activities, Air Pollution and Health F 3     0.5
    CIV550H1 – Water Resources Engineering F 3   2 0.5
    HST209H1 – Introduction to Health: Determinants of Health & Health Care F 3     0.5
    MIE368H1 – Analytics in Action F 2 3 1 0.5
    Winter Courses          
    CHE416H1 – Chemical Engineering in Human Health S 3   1 0.5
    CHE460H1 – Environmental Pathways and Impact Assessment S 3   2 0.5
    CHE561H1 – Risk-Based Safety Management S 3   1 0.5
    CIV577H1 – Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities S 3   1 0.5
    GGR433H1 – Built Environment and Health S 3     0.5
    GGR434H1 – Building Community Resilience S 3     0.5
    HST211H1 – Health Policy in Canada S 3     0.5
    HST330H1 – Population Health S 2     0.5
    MIE542H1 – Human Factors Integration S 3   2 0.5
    MIE561H1 – Healthcare Systems S 3   1 0.5

    Notes:

    Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable. Students must secure approval from their home department before selecting any elective outside their departmental approved list.


    CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC POLICY AND ENGINEERING (AECERPPGE)

    CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC POLICY AND ENGINEERING (AECERPPGE)

    Engineering is a fundamentally public endeavour. Many foundational engineering projects – from bridges to waterworks to recent climate mitigation efforts - are undertaken with government partners. Private projects are similarly shaped by public regulations. Public policy training will enable engineers to build effective and informed collaborations with these public actors, from governments to regulatory agencies. This proficiency will also help engineers knowledgeably participate in policy making. Technological expertise is essential to public decision-making, and familiarity with public institutions and processes will facilitate engineers’ contributions to the many issues facing an urbanizing, changing planet.


    All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible to participate in this certificate program. Students who complete the requirements of the Certificate will receive a notation on their transcript upon graduation.

    The requirements for the Certificate are the successful completion of the following courses:

    1. PPG201H1F: Microeconomics for Engineers
    2. PPG302H1F: Institutions and Public Policy for Engineers
    3. PPG402H1S: Public Policy Analysis for Engineers

    Note: Availability of the courses for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.


    Courses Term Lect Lab Tut Wgt
    Fall Courses
    PPG201H1 – Microeconomics for Engineers F 2 - 1 0.5
    PPG302H1 – Institutions and Public Policy for Engineers F 2 - - 0.5
    Winter Courses
    PPG402H1 – Public Policy Analysis for Engineers S 2 - - 0.5

    CERTIFICATE IN RENEWABLE RESOURCES ENGINEERING (AECERRRE)

    CERTIFICATE IN RENEWABLE RESOURCES ENGINEERING (AECERRRE)

    Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate is included on transcripts. Note that no course counted for degree credit, can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

    The Forestry faculty at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and design have expertise in sustainable resource management and bio-economics, sustainable energy production, green manufacturing and sustainable communities. This grouping of courses developed for engineering students reflects the strong interconnections between their work and various branches of Engineering. The Certificate provides recognition for a demonstrated focus in renewable resources. Students in all disciplines are eligible to participate in this Certificate.

    Students pursuing the Certificate in Renewable Resources Engineering Leadership must successfully complete a minimum of 3 courses from the list outlined below:

    Courses   Lect. Lab. Tut. Wgt.
    Choose three of:          
    CHE475H1: Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration S 3 - 1 0.50
    FOR308H1: Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development F 3 - 1 0.50
    FOR421H1: Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City Forests F 2 - - 0.50
    FOR424H1: Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials S 2 - 1 0.50
    FOR425H1: Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology S 2 - 2 0.50

    NOTE:

    • Availability of the courses (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable.
    • Students must secure approval from their home department before selecting any elective outside their departmental approved list.
    • If a student is pursuing both the Renewable Resources Engineering Certificate and a Minor that lists the course, the courses listed above can only be counted towards either the certificate or the minor, not both.

    Certificate Programs Courses

    Aerospace Science and Engineering

    AER507H1 - Introduction to Fusion Energy

    AER507H1 - Introduction to Fusion Energy
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Nuclear reactions between light elements provide the energy source for the sun and stars. On earth, such reactions could form the basis of an essentially inexhaustible energy resource. In order for the fusion reactions to proceed at a rate suitable for the generation of electricity, the fuels (usually hydrogen) must be heated to temperatures near 100 million Kelvin. At these temperatures, the fuel will exist in the plasma state. This course will cover: (i) the basic physics of fusion, including reaction cross-sections, particle energy distributions, Lawson criterion and radiation balance, (ii) plasma properties including plasma waves, plasma transport, heating and stability, and (iii) fusion plasma confinement methods (magnetic and inertial). Topics will be related to current experimental research in the field.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    Applied Science and Engineering (Interdepartmental)

    APS360H1 - Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning

    APS360H1 - Applied Fundamentals of Deep Learning
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    A basic introduction to the history, technology, programming and applications of the fast evolving field of deep learning. Topics to be covered may include neural networks, autoencoders/decoders, recurrent neural networks, natural language processing, and generative adversarial networks. Special attention will be paid to fairness and ethics issues surrounding machine learning. An applied approach will be taken, where students get hands-on exposure to the covered techniques through the use of state-of-the-art machine learning software frameworks.

    Prerequisite: APS105H1/APS106H1/ESC180H1/CSC180H1; APS163/MAT187H1/ESC195H1; MAT185H1/MAT188H1
    Recommended Preparation: CHE223H1/CME263H1/ECE302H1/MIE231H1/MIE236H1/MSE238H1/STA286H1/ECE286H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    APS420H1 - Technology, Engineering and Global Development

    APS420H1 - Technology, Engineering and Global Development
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L

    Humanities and Social Science Elective

    The role of technology and engineering in global development is explored through a combination of lectures, readings, case studies, and analysis of key technologies, including energy, information and communications technologies, water and healthcare. Topics include a brief history and basic theories of international development and foreign aid, major government and non-government players, emerging alternative models (social entrepreneurship, microfinance, risk capital approaches), major and emerging players in social venture capital and philanthropy, the role of financial markets, environmental and resource considerations/sustainable development, technology diffusion models and appropriate technologies.

    Exclusion: APS520H1, APS420H1
    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    APS440H1 - Making Sense of Accidents

    APS440H1 - Making Sense of Accidents
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8P

    Despite the best of engineering practices, spectacular failures of complex technological systems occur regularly. Traditional engineering explanations for the causes of accidents utilize eventchain models and often blame operators. This course highlights the limitations of such models and shows that accidents in sociotechnical systems can be better understood using systems engineering. Further insights are provided by reviewing various sociological theories that have been advanced to explain and prevent accidents.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    APS470H1 - Engineering and Public Health

    APS470H1 - Engineering and Public Health
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    An introduction to the disciplines of public health and the connections with engineering; quantitative and qualitative public health methods including study designs and statistical analysis; legal, regulatory and ethical frameworks applicable to public health; the structure and regulation of the public health and health care system; examples of common public health hazards to illustrate public health toxicology, exposure measurement and modelling, data analysis and prevention strategies.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    APS510H1 - Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems

    APS510H1 - Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Complementary Studies elective

    A broad range of global energy systems are presented including electricity generation, electricity end use, transportation and infrastructure. Discussions are based on two key trends: (a) the increasing ability to deploy technologies and engineering systems globally, and (b) innovative organizations, many driven by entrepreneurship (for profit and social) and entrepreneurial finance techniques. The course considers these types of innovations in the context of developed economies, rapidly developing economies such as India and China, and the developing world. The course will interweave a mix of industry examples and more in-depth case studies. The examples and cases are examined with various engineering, business and environmental sustainability analysis perspectives.

    Prerequisite: Undergraduate economics course
    Exclusion: APS310H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    APS530H1 - Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development

    APS530H1 - Appropriate Technology & Design for Global Development
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L

    Engineering design within the context of global society, emphasizing the needs of users in order to support appropriate, sustainable technology. A design project will comprise the major component of the course work. The course will take the approach of "design for X". Students are expected to be familiar with design for functionality, safety, robustness, etc. This course will extend the students' understanding of design methodologies to design for "appropriateness in developing regions". Readings and discussions will explore the social, cultural, economic, educational, environmental and political contexts in which third world end users relate to technology. Students will then incorporate their deepened understanding of this context in their design project. The projects will be analyzed for functionality as well as appropriateness and sustainability in the third world context. Upon completion of the course, students should have a deeper appreciation of the meaning of appropriate technology in various international development sectors such as healthcare, water & sanitation, land management, energy, infrastructure, and communications in both urban and rural settings.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    CHE249H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis

    CHE249H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Engineering analysis and design are not ends in themselves, but they are a means for satisfying human wants. Thus, engineering concerns itself with the materials used and forces and laws of nature, and the needs of people. Because of scarcity of resources and constraints at all levels, engineering must be closely associated with economics. It is essential that engineering proposals be evaluated in terms of worth and cost before they are undertaken. In this course we emphasize that an essential prerequisite of a successful engineering application is economic feasibility. Hence, investment proposals are evaluated in terms of economic cost concepts, including break even analysis, cost estimation and time value of money. Effective interest rates, inflation and deflation, depreciation and income tax all affect the viability of an investment. Successful engineering projects are chosen from valid alternatives considering such issues as buy or lease, make or buy, cost and benefits and financing alternatives. Both public sector and for-profit examples are used to illustrate the applicability of these rules and approaches.

    Prerequisite: CHE221H1, CHE223H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    CHE374H1 - Economic Analysis and Decision Making

    CHE374H1 - Economic Analysis and Decision Making
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Economic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals. Cost estimation; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; inflation; equity, bond and loan financing; after tax cash flow; measures of economic merit in the private and public sectors; sensitivity and risk analysis; single and multi-attribute decisions. Introduction to micro-economic. Applications: retirement and replacement analysis; make-buy and buy-lease decisions; economic life of assets; capital budgeting; selection from alternative engineering proposals; production planning; investment selection.

    Prerequisite: MAT194H1, ESC103H1
    Exclusion: CHE249H1, CME368H1/MIE258H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    CHE441H1 - Engineering Materials

    CHE441H1 - Engineering Materials
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    This course advances the understanding of the use of materials in engineering design, with special emphasis on corrosion and the effect of chemical environment on long term failure modes. Students will learn how to apply material property data to specify materials for load bearing applications, thermal and other non-structural applications, and chemical containment and transport. Topics will include strength of materials concepts, an introduction to computerized materials databases, material failure modes and criteria, principles of corrosion, and practical applications of corrosion prediction and mitigation. Students are required to design a component of their choice and do a detailed materials selection as a major design project.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    CHE467H1 - Environmental Engineering

    CHE467H1 - Environmental Engineering
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor A course which treats environmental engineering from a broad based but quantitative perspective and covers the driving forces for engineering activities as well as engineering principles. Models which are used for environmental impact, risk analysis, health impact, pollutant dispersion, and energy system analysis are covered.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    CHE475H1 - Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration

    CHE475H1 - Biocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    An overview on structure, processing and application of natural and biological materials, biomaterials for biomedical applications, and fibre-reinforced eco-composites based on renewable resources will be provided. Fundamental principles related to linear elasticity, linear viscoelasticity, dynamic mechanical response, composite reinforcement mechanics, and time-temperature correspondence will be introduced. Novel concepts in comparative biomechanics, biomimetic and bio-inspired material design, and materials' ecological and environmental impact will be discussed. In addition, key material processing methods and testing and characterization techniques will be presented. Structure-property relationships for materials broadly ranging from natural materials, including wood, bone, cell, and soft tissue, to synthetic composite materials for industrial and biomedical applications will be covered.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    CHE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

    CHE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1, MIE488H1, MSE488H1 and CIV488H1.)

    *Complementary Studies Elective

    Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    CHE561H1 - Risk Based Safety Management

    CHE561H1 - Risk Based Safety Management
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    This course provides an introduction to Process Safety Management. The historical drivers to improve safety performance are reviewed and the difference between safety management and occupational health and safety is discussed. National and international standards for PSM are reviewed. Risk analysis is introduced along with techniques for process hazard analysis and quantification. Consequence and frequency modelling is introduced. Rsik based decision making is introduced, and the course concludes with a discussio of the key management systems required for a successful PSM system.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    CHE566H1 - Elements of Nuclear Engineering

    CHE566H1 - Elements of Nuclear Engineering
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    A first course in nuclear engineering intended to introduce students to all aspects of this interdisciplinary field. Topics covered include nuclear technology, atomic and nuclear physics, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission, nuclear reactor theory, nuclear power plants, radiation protection and shielding, environment and nuclear safety, and the nuclear fuel cycle.

    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    CHE568H1 - Nuclear Engineering

    CHE568H1 - Nuclear Engineering
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Fundamental and applied aspects of nuclear engineering. The structure of the nucleus; nuclear stability and radioactive decay; the interaction of radiation with matter including radiological health hazards; the interaction of neutrons including cross-sections, flux, moderation, fission, neutron diffusion and criticality. Poison buildup and their effects on criticality. Nuclear engineering of reactors, reactor accidents, and safety issues.

    Exclusion: MIE414H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    Civil Engineering

    CIV440H1 - Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment

    CIV440H1 - Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor. The process and techniques for assessing and managing the impacts on and risks to humans and the ecosystem associated with engineered facilities, processes and products. Both biophysical and social impacts are addressed. Topics include: environmental assessment processes; environmental legislation; techniques for assessing impacts; engineering risk analysis; health risk assessment; risk management and communication; social impact assessment; cumulative impacts; environmental management systems; the process of considering alternative methods for preventing and controlling impacts; and stakeholder involvement and public participation. Examples are drawn from various engineering activities and facilities such as energy production, chemical production, treatment plants, highways and landfills.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    CIV488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

    CIV488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered in other Departments: MSE488H1, MIE488H1, ECE488H1 and CHE488H1.)

    *Complementary Studies Elective

    Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    CIV510H1 - Solid Mechanics II

    CIV510H1 - Solid Mechanics II
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    This course provides a continuing study of the mechanics of deformable solids. Stress and equilibrium conditions, strain and compatibility conditions, stress-strain relations and yield/failure criteria are considered in the context of civil engineering materials. Two-and three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed, with an introduction to the use of tensor notation. Advanced topics in bending, shear and torsion of beams are also covered, as is elementary plate bending theory. The course concludes with a further development and application of energy methods including virtual work, potential energy, strain energy, and related approaches.

    Prerequisite: CME210H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    Civil and Mineral Engineering

    CME368H1 - Engineering Economics and Decision Making

    CME368H1 - Engineering Economics and Decision Making
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    The incorporation of economic and non-monetary considerations for making decision about public and private sector engineering systems in urban and other contexts. Topics include rational decision making; cost concepts; time value of money and engineering economics; microeconomic concepts; treatment of risk and uncertainty; and public project evaluation techniques incorporating social and environmental impacts including benefit cost analysis and multi-objective analysis.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    Computer Science

    CSC384H1 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

    CSC384H1 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 24L/12T

    Theories and algorithms that capture (or approximate) some of the core elements of computational intelligence. Topics include: search; logical representations and reasoning, classical automated planning, representing and reasoning with uncertainty, learning, decision making (planning) under uncertainty. Assignments provide practical experience, in both theory and programming, of the core topics.

    Prerequisite: (CSC263H1/​ CSC265H1/ CSC263H5/ CSCB63H3/ ECE345H1/ ECE358H1/ MIE335H1/ (CSC148H1, enrolled in ASMAJ1446A, completed at least 9.0 credits), STA220H1/ STA237H1/ STA247H1/​ STA255H1/​ STA257H1/ STA237H1/ STAB57H3/ STAB52H3/ ECE302H1/ STA286H1/ CHE223H1/ CME263H1/ MIE231H1/ MIE236H1/ MSE238H1/ ECE286H1/ PSY201H1)
    Exclusion: CSC384H5, CSCD84H3. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at A&S, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at A&S, are limited to a maximum of 1.5 credits in 300-/400-level CSC/ECE courses.
    Recommended Preparation: CSC324H1

    Electrical and Computer Engineering

    ECE345H1 - Algorithms and Data Structures

    ECE345H1 - Algorithms and Data Structures
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    Design and analysis of algorithms and data structures that are essential to engineers in every aspect of the computer hardware and software industry. Recurrences, asymptotics, summations, trees and graphs. Sorting, search trees and balanced search trees, amortized analysis, hash functions, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, basic graph algorithms, minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, introduction to NP completeness and new trends in algorithms and data structures.

    Prerequisite: ECE244H1 or equivalent with the permission of the Chair of the AI certificate/minor.
    Total AUs: 46.5 (Fall), 50.4 (Winter), 96.9 (Full Year)

    ECE421H1 - Introduction to Machine Learning

    ECE421H1 - Introduction to Machine Learning
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    An Introduction to the basic theory, the fundamental algorithms, and the computational toolboxes of machine learning. The focus is on a balanced treatment of the practical and theoretical approaches, along with hands on experience with relevant software packages. Supervised learning methods covered in the course will include: the study of linear models for classification and regression, neural networks and support vector machines. Unsupervised learning methods covered in the course will include: principal component analysis, k-means clustering, and Gaussian mixture models. Theoretical topics will include: bounds on the generalization error, bias-variance tradeoffs and the Vapnik-Chervonenkis (VC) dimension. Techniques to control overfitting, including regularization and validation, will be covered.

    Prerequisite: ECE286H1/STA286H1, ECE302H1/MIE231H1/CHE223H1/MIE236H1/MSE238H1
    Exclusion: CSC411H1, ECE521H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    ECE446H1 - Sensory Communication

    ECE446H1 - Sensory Communication
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

    Physical acoustics, acoustic measurements, electroacoustic transducers, and physiological acoustics. Speech processing, speech recognition algorithms and signal processing by the auditory system. Engineering aspects of acoustic design. Electrical models of acoustic systems. Noise, noise-induced hearing loss, and noise control. Introduction to vision and other modalities. Musical and psychoacoustics.

    Total AUs: 50.2 (Fall), 54.4 (Winter), 104.6 (Full Year)

    ECE472H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship

    ECE472H1 - Engineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    The economic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals are discussed. Cost concepts; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; the time value of money and compound interest; inflation; capital budgeting; equity, bond and loan financing; income tax and after-tax cash flow in engineering project proposals; measures of economic merit in the public sector; sensitivity and risk analysis. Applications: evaluations of competing engineering project alternatives; replacement analysis; economic life of assets; lease versus buy decisions; break-even and sensitivity analysis. Entrepreneurship and the Canadian business environment will be discussed.

    Total AUs: 46.5 (Fall), 50.4 (Winter), 96.9 (Full Year)

    ECE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

    ECE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: MSE488H1, MIE488H1, CHE488H1 and CIV488H1.)

    *Complementary Studies Elective

    Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    Forestry

    FOR308H1 - Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development

    FOR308H1 - Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Humanities and Social Science elective

    Trees and their components have been used through the centuries for shelter, heat, entertainment, weapons, sport, furnishings, communication, food and medicines. This course explores the co-evolution of nature and culture by examining the social and economic impacts that the forest and its exploitation had in the development of societies throughout the ages. Focus will be on the cultural history of wood and products derived from it and its influence on developing societies from biblical times to modern day. The course will examine how wood's versatility and usefulness in varied applications has been discovered by society as needs for survival to austerity develop. The unique properties of woody materials will be examined to expose its ability to meet the varied demands of societies throughout the ages. This course will allow students to explore the place and role of wood derived products in sustainable society.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    FOR421H1 - Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City Forests

    FOR421H1 - Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City Forests
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L

    Complementary Studies elective

    With over 80% of the world's population now living in cities, tomorrow's forests will be urban. Increasing global recognition of nature deficit disorder and the values of green infrastructure to mitigate broader human impacts gives a new meaning to the term 'urban forestry', coined here at UofT and now recognized widely. Trees in and around the city are key to providing multiple engineered and ecological services that only recently have been brought into the responsible fiscal planning of every municipality around the globe. If managed properly (a key concept), urban forests mitigate climate change and urban heat island effects, act as carbon sinks, air filters, water purifiers, air conditioners, noise dampeners, wildlife and/or biodiversity refuges, and green spaces for the human spirit. Here, we explore the challenges and opportunities of this exciting new applied field at the cross-roads of ecology, engineering and planning to ensure future global sustainability.

    Exclusion: FOR416H1
    Total AUs: 23.6 (Fall), 25.6 (Winter), 49.2 (Full Year)

    FOR424H1 - Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials

    FOR424H1 - Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

    Sustainable materials are a mandate for sustainable societies. This course will explore the manufacturing, engineering principles and design fundamentals for creating sustainable materials from renewable resources. Special emphasis will be on bioplastics, biofibre, nanobiofibre, biocomposites and nanobiocomposites. Written communication and design skills will be developed through tutorials and assignments.

    Exclusion: FOR423H1
    Recommended Preparation: Basic knowledge of materials science.
    Total AUs: 29.5 (Fall), 32 (Winter), 61.5 (Full Year)

    FOR425H1 - Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology

    FOR425H1 - Bioenergy and Biorefinery Technology
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    Technological advances and approaches in deriving biofuels, chemical feedstocks from forest and other biomass resources. Fundamental chemical attributes of biomass, as they affect the fuel value and potential for deriving liquid, solid and gaseous fuels and valuable chemicals for other applications will be explored.

    Exclusion: FOR410H1
    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    Joint Courses

    JRE300H1 - Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance

    JRE300H1 - Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Complementary Studies elective

    Introduces a brief overview of essential concepts in accounting and corporate finance. The first part of the course covers the fundamentals of accounting. We start by exploring the basic language of accounting and the fundamental concepts of financial reporting. Students learn to read and analyze basic financial statements including the statements of financial position, comprehensive income, changes in equity, and cash flows. We then introduce key management accounting concepts and explore various methods of costing for decision-making. The second part of the course covers the fundamentals of corporate finance. In the second half, students will learn how to make financial projections and how to value complex investment opportunities. Following this, students learn various techniques for controlling risk and how to determine the appropriate cost of capital. Finally, the course considers issues in cash flow management and overviews project valuation as it relates to corporate mergers.

    Exclusion: CHE375H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    JRE410H1 - Markets and Competitive Strategy

    JRE410H1 - Markets and Competitive Strategy
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6P

    Complementary Studies elective

    Introduces the basic concepts, frameworks and methodologies useful to managers in crafting and executing entrepreneurial business strategies in technology-based companies. In the first part of the course, students gain an understanding of the external, internal, and dynamic environments of a business and the elements of a superior competitive position. In the second part, we focus on designing and delivering customer value, which involves strategic decisions about segmentation, targeting and positioning, and tactical decisions related to product introductions, marketing communications, distribution channels and pricing. In the third part of the course, we build on these fundamentals and examine challenges related to innovation and industry dynamics, such as industry life cycles, disruptive technologies, product renewal, and the relationship between R&D and commercialization.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    JRE420H1 - People Management and Organizational Behaviour

    JRE420H1 - People Management and Organizational Behaviour
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Spans three inter-related topics within organizational behavior and human resources: individual behavior, group behaviour, and leadership. It provides students with both the theory and practice of how to work, lead, and thrive in organizations. Topics include theories of personality, learning, power, decision making, ethics, culture, communication, leadership, teamwork, and motivation teamwork. These topics are taught in three ways:

    1. Case studies, role play & simulation exercises followed by class discussion
    2. Surveys of Personality & Skills
    3. Lectures, discussions, and readings based on the current research on the topic

    Exclusion: IRE260H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    MIE245H1 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    MIE245H1 - Data Structures and Algorithms
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

    Introduction to algorithms (principles involved in designing, analyzing, and implementing algorithms). Basic data structures (lists, sets, maps, stacks, queues). Graphs and graph search. Decision algorithms (greedy methods and approximation algorithms). Sorting, divide-and-conquer, and recursive algorithms. Trees, heaps, and priority queues. Hashing and hash tables. Algorithmic analysis: big-O complexity. Numerical methods as examples of algorithms and big-O analysis (matrix inversion, matrix decomposition, solving linear system of equations).

    Prerequisite: MIE262H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    MIE258H1 - Engineering Economics and Accounting

    MIE258H1 - Engineering Economics and Accounting
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Engineering economic and accounting concepts needed in the design of engineering systems. Financial analysis topics include: financial statements, depreciation, income tax, and basic accounting techniques. Project analysis topics includes: time value of money, evaluation of cash flows, defining alternatives, analysis of independent projects, acceptance criteria, buy or lease, make or buy, replacement analysis, economic analysis in the public sector, project risk and uncertainty. Inflation concepts.

    Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent
    Exclusion: CHE249H1, CHE374H1, CME368H1, ECE472H1, MIE358H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    MIE304H1 - Introduction to Quality Control

    MIE304H1 - Introduction to Quality Control
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

    Introduction to quality engineering. Quality standards and certification. TQM. Modeling processes with simulation. Making inferences about product quality from real or simulation output data. Introduction to statistical process control. Control charts for variables and attributes. Process capability analysis. Lot Acceptance Sampling.

    Prerequisite: MIE231 or equivalent
    Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

    MIE364H1 - Quality Control and Improvement

    MIE364H1 - Quality Control and Improvement
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

    In manufacturing and service industries alike, quality is viewed as an important strategic tool for increasing competitiveness. Continuous quality improvement is a key factor leading to a company's success. With more emphasis on quality, the cost and the product cycle time are reduced and the communication between producer and customer is improved. The course focuses on the following topics: introduction to quality engineering, TQM, quality standards, supplier-producer relations and quality certification, costs of quality, statistical process control for long and short production runs, process capability analysis and acceptance sampling, quality certification, six sigma quality, quality improvement using designed experiments and an overview of the Taguchi Methods.

    Prerequisite: MIE236H1 or equivalent
    Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

    MIE407H1 - Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design

    MIE407H1 - Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    This course covers the basic principles of the neutronic design and analysis of nuclear fission reactors with a focus on Generation IV nuclear systems. Topics include radioactivity, neutron interactions with matter, neutron diffusion and moderation, the fission chain reaction, the critical reactor equation, reactivity effects and reactor kinetics. Multigroup neutron diffusion calculations are demonstrated using fast-spectrum reactor designs.

    Prerequisite: MIE230H1 or equivalent
    Recommended Preparation: CHE566H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    MIE408H1 - * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors

    MIE408H1 - * Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    This course covers the basic principles of the thermo-mechanical design and analysis of nuclear power reactors. Topics include reactor heat generation and removal, nuclear materials, diffusion of heat in fuel elements, thermal and mechanical stresses in fuel and reactor components, single-phase and two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transport in nuclear reactors, and core thermo-mechanical design.

    Prerequisite: MIE407H1/MIE222H1, MIE312H1, MIE313H1 or equivalents
    Recommended Preparation: CHE566H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    MIE424H1 - Optimization in Machine Learning

    MIE424H1 - Optimization in Machine Learning
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

    1. To enable deeper understanding and more flexible use of standard machine learning methods, through development of machine learning from an Optimization perspective.

    2. To enable students to apply these machine learning methods to problems in finance and marketing, such as stock return forecasting, credit risk scoring, portfolio management, fraud detection and customer segmentation.

    Prerequisite: MIE365H1/MIE376H1/ECE367H1/ROB310H1, or equivalent
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    MIE442H1 - Machine Design

    MIE442H1 - Machine Design
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/38.4T/19.2P

    Introduction to the fundamental elements of mechanical design including the selection of engineering materials, load determination and failure analysis under static, impact, vibration and cyclic loads. Surface failure and fatigue under contact loads, lubrication and wear. Consideration is given to the characteristics and selection of machine elements such as bearings, shafts, power screws and couplings.

    Prerequisite: MIE320H1
    Total AUs: 62 (Fall), 67.2 (Winter), 129.2 (Full Year)

    MIE469H1 - Reliability and Maintainability Engineering

    MIE469H1 - Reliability and Maintainability Engineering
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    An introduction to the life-cycle costing concept for equipment acquisition, operation, and replacement decision-making. Designing for reliability and determination of optimal maintenance and replacement policies for both capital equipment and components. Topics include: identification of an items failure distribution and reliability function, reliability of series, parallel, and redundant systems design configurations, time-to-repair and maintainability function, age and block replacement policies for components, the economic life model for capital equipment, provisioning of spare parts.

    Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent, MIE258H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    MIE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

    MIE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1, MSE488H1, CHE488H1 and CIV488H1.)

    *Complementary Studies Elective

    Exclusion: TEP234H1, TEP432H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    Mineral Engineering

    MIN120H1 - Insight into Mineral Engineering

    MIN120H1 - Insight into Mineral Engineering
    Hours: 51.2L/12.8T

    A comprehensive introduction to the global minerals industry using international regulatory requirements as a thematic structure. Engineering applications together with current and emerging issues are emphasized throughout. Principal topics include: mineral resources in the economy; stakeholder concerns and responsible mining; mineral exploration; surface and sub‑surface mine development and operation; fundamentals of mineral processing; mineral industry finance.

    Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.60 (Winter), 110.70 (Full Year)

    MIN250H1 - Surface Mining

    MIN250H1 - Surface Mining
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Operational aspects of open pit mine design and mine planning. Topics will include: open pit design and pit optimization; long term and short term planning considerations; materials handling; equipment selection and optimization; industrial minerals production; mine safety and mine regulations; mining and the environment; mine personnel organization; ethics and professional issues. Pit dewatering, the location and stability of waste dumps and an examination of equipment cost and production statistics are also included.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    MIN301H1 - Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource Estimation

    MIN301H1 - Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource Estimation
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Introduction to Mineral Resource and Mineral Reserve Estimation is an advanced level course that focuses on the stages of a mineral resource and mineral reserve estimation program from assembling the database through to reporting under industry guidelines. Major course topics include: statistical analysis of sampling data, geologic interpretation and deposit models; mineral resources estimation approaches and methods, mineral reserve estimation, classification of resources and reserves, and reporting under regulatory standards and industry guidelines for professional practice.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    MIN330H1 - Mining Environmental Management

    MIN330H1 - Mining Environmental Management
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    This course provides an overview of the major aspects of mining environmental management from exploration, through design and development of the property, into operation, and final closure implementation. An applied approach is taken utilizing case studies and examples where possible. Participation and discussion is an integral part of the course. Topics include sustainable development, environmental impacts, designing for mitigation, environmental management systems and reclamation.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    MIN351H1 - Underground Mining

    MIN351H1 - Underground Mining
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Operational aspects of underground mine design and mine planning. Topics will include: underground mining methods for hard and soft rock; shaft sinking, hoisting and materials handling; equipment selection and optimization; mine safety and mine regulations; mine personnel organization; ethics and professional issues. Development and production costs associated with mining are an inherent aspect of this course.

    Exclusion: MIN350H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    Materials Science and Engineering

    MSE401H1 - Materials Information in Design

    MSE401H1 - Materials Information in Design
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/12.8T/25.6P

    This course presents approaches to composite and structural design, and optimization, for components and products. Tools for optimization, material property data analytics, and structural simulation will be used. We will apply advanced materials selection (and the CES materials database) to product and component design, and hybrid (composite) materials design. Composite mechanics theory and topology optimization will be developed for structural optimization. Finally, modern techniques including AI and machine learning will be presented for aspects of materials selection, composite design and structural optimization. Component design decisions will include both material properties and the capabilities of applicable fabrication processes, to identify the material and process which best satisfy the design requirements.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    MSE415H1 - Environmental Degradation of Materials

    MSE415H1 - Environmental Degradation of Materials
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    This course deals with four major areas: electrochemistry of low temperature aqueous solvents, the corrosion of materials, mechano-chemical effects in materials and corrosion prevention in design. Electrochemistry deals with thermodynamics of material-electrolyte systems involving ion-solvent, ion-ion interactions, activity coefficients, Nernst equation and Pourbaix diagrams, and rate theory through activation and concentration polarization. Corrosion of metallic, polymeric, ceramic, composite, electronic and biomaterials will be explored along with mechano-chemical effects of stress corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion fatigue. Corrosion prevention in terms of case histories and the use of expert systems in materials selection.

    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    MSE419H1 - Fracture and Failure Analysis

    MSE419H1 - Fracture and Failure Analysis
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    Fracture mechanisms and mechanics of solid materials. Topics include: nature of brittle and ductile fracture, macro-phenomena and micro-mechanisms of failure of various materials, mechanisms of fatigue; crack nucleation and propagation, Griffith theory, stress field at crack tips, stress intensity factor and fracture toughness, crack opening displacement, energy principle and the J-integral, fracture mechanics in fatigue, da/dN curves and their significance. Practical examples of fatigue analysis and fundamentals of non-destructive testing.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    MSE431H1 - Forensic Engineering

    MSE431H1 - Forensic Engineering
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    The course provides participants with an understanding of scientific and engineering investigation methods and tools to assess potential sources, causes and solutions for prevention of failure due to natural accidents, fire, high and low speed impacts, design defects, improper selection of materials, manufacturing defects, improper service conditions, inadequate maintenance and human error. The fundamentals of accident reconstruction principles and procedures for origin and cause investigations are demonstrated through a wide range of real world case studies including: medical devices, sports equipment, electronic devices, vehicular collisions, structural collapse, corrosion failures, weld failures, fire investigations and patent infringements. Compliance with industry norms and standards, product liability, sources of liability, proving liability, defense against liability and other legal issues will be demonstrated with mock courtroom trial proceedings involving invited professionals to elucidate the role of an engineer as an expert witness in civil and criminal court proceedings.

    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    Robotics

    ROB311H1 - Artificial Intelligence

    ROB311H1 - Artificial Intelligence
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

    An introduction to the fundamental principles of artificial intelligence from a mathematical perspective. The course will trace the historical development of AI and describe key results in the field. Topics include the philosophy of AI, search methods in problem solving, knowledge representation and reasoning, logic, planning, and learning paradigms. A portion of the course will focus on ethical AI, embodied AI, and on the quest for artificial general intelligence.

    Prerequisite: ECE286H1, ECE302H1 and ECE345H1, ECE358H1, CSC263H1
    Total AUs: 41.3 (Fall), 44.8 (Winter), 86.1 (Full Year)

    ROB313H1 - Introduction to Learning from Data

    ROB313H1 - Introduction to Learning from Data
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

    This course will introduce students to the topic of machine learning, which is key to the design of intelligent systems and gaining actionable insights from datasets that arise in computational science and engineering. The course will cover the theoretical foundations of this topic as well as computational aspects of algorithms for unsupervised and supervised learning. The topics to be covered include: The learning problem, clustering and k-means, principal component analysis, linear regression and classification, generalized linear models, bias-variance tradeoff, regularization methods, maximum likelihood estimation, kernel methods, the representer theorem, radial basis functions, support vector machines for regression and classification, an introduction to the theory of generalization, feedforward neural networks, stochastic gradient descent, ensemble learning, model selection and validation.

    Prerequisite: ECE286H1, MAT185H1, MAT195H1, CSC263H1/ECE358H1
    Exclusion: ECE421H1, CSC411H1, STA314H1
    Total AUs: 47.2 (Fall), 51.2 (Winter), 98.4 (Full Year)

    ISTEP

    TEP234H1 - Entrepreneurship and Small Business

    TEP234H1 - Entrepreneurship and Small Business
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 51.2L/12.8T

    Complementary Studies elective

    Part 1 of the 2 Part Entrepreneurship Program

    The age of enterprise has arrived. Strategic use of technology in all sorts of businesses makes the difference between success and failure for these firms. Wealth creation is a real option for many and the business atmosphere is ready for you! Increasingly, people are seeing the advantages of doing their own thing, in their own way, in their own time. Entrepreneurs can control their own lives, structure their own progress and be accountable for their own success - they can fail, but they cannot be fired! After all, engineers are the most capable people to be in the forefront of this drive to the business life of the 21st century.

    This course is the first of a series of two dealing with entrepreneurship and management of a small company. It is intended the student would  take the follow-up course TEP432 as they progress toward their engineering degree. Therefore, it is advisable that the descriptions of both courses be studied, prior enrolling in this one.

    This is a limited enrolment course. If the number of students electing to take the course exceeds the class size limit, selection of the final group will be made on the basis of the "Entrepreneur's Test". A certificate will be awarded upon the successful completion of both courses, attesting to the student having passed this Entrepreneurial Course Series at the University of Toronto.

    The course is based on real life issues, not theoretical developments or untried options. Topics covered include: Who is an entrepreneur; Canadian business environment; Acquisitions; Different business types (retail, wholesale, manufacturing, and services); Franchising; Human resources, Leadership, Business Law; and many others. Several invited visitors  provide the student with the opportunity to meet real entrepreneurs. There will be several assignments and a session project. Please note, the 5 hours per week would be used for whatever is needed at the time. Tutorials will not normally happen as the calendar indicates them.

    Exclusion: CHE488H1/CIV488H1/ECE488H1/MIE488H1/MSE488H1/APS281H1
    Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

    TEP281H1 - Language and Meaning

    TEP281H1 - Language and Meaning
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 28.2L/28.2T

    Humanities and Social Science elective

    As students study how language is used to make meaning in diverse contexts, they will hone their own skills in deploying written and oral professional engineering language. The course explores the nature of language across linguistic, discipline and cultural boundaries. Students apply the theoretical knowledge of language and language learning to their own written and oral language performances. In conjunction with this, theories of translation and bilingualism will be introduced to challenge assumptions about the universality of meanings. Weekly lecture and tutorial.

    Exclusion: APS281H1
    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP320H1 - Representing Science on Stage

    TEP320H1 - Representing Science on Stage
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    Humanities and Social Science elective

    An examination of representations of science/scientists in theatre. Reading and/or viewing of works by contemporary playwrights and related materials on science and culture. Critical essays; in-class discussion and scene study.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP321H1 - Introduction to Science Communication

    TEP321H1 - Introduction to Science Communication
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    Humanities and Social Science elective

    Introduces students to the history, theory and practice of communicating science to the public. We first establish a theoretical foundation for understanding the complex relationship between science, scientists, and the public, closely examining techniques and strategies for communicating about science to non-technical readers with a variety of backgrounds and ideological perspectives. We apply these concepts to contemporary case studies in multiple media, focusing on (mis)representations of climate, environmental, and biomedical sciences, breakthroughs in engineering. In doing so, we explore how the shift from traditional news to new media – including videos, podcasts, and social media – has changed how science is communicated to the public, plus the implications of this shift for scientists and engineers.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP322H1 - Language and Power

    TEP322H1 - Language and Power
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    Humanities and Social Science elective

    This course explores Rhetoric historically to understand its development and practically to understand how ideas are constructed, disseminated, shared or imposed. The course explores worldview - the organizing structure by which we view the world - to position the student as rhetorically effective in multiple contexts. Students analyze political, cultural, and scientific discourse from great speeches to advertising to research papers. Students develop their rhetorical, communication, and persuasive abilities.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP323H1 - Writing Lab

    TEP323H1 - Writing Lab
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    This course uses writing in various modes as an exploratory process.Students strengthen their communication skills by exploring different expressive voices, each with a different potential to uncover and communicate ideas. A synthesis of various voices strengthens each of them; hence, by exploring their poetic, story-telling, scientific and analytic voices, students becomes better analytic, scientific or creative writers.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP324H1 - Engineering and Social Justice

    TEP324H1 - Engineering and Social Justice
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    The purpose of this course is to enable future engineers to initiate, facilitate and moderate discussion between stakeholders with differing and/or opposing values and ideologies.  The relationship between engineering and the concepts of social justice to develop the skills needed to take practical action in a complex world is explored. This course facilitates building  personal responses to ideas of justice, bias and marginalization. These ideas affect Engineers and Engineering in general, domestically and globally, in projects and in contexts, such as the workplace and academic environment. Readings will be drawn from current writers on Engineering and Social Justice. Students will rehearse action through theatre techniques, developed to enable communities to practice and critique action.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP325H1 - Engineering and Science in the Arts

    TEP325H1 - Engineering and Science in the Arts
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    Humanities and Social Science elective

    This course examines the connections between engineers, scientists, and artists. Taking examples from architecture, sculpture, painting, and the performing arts, this course will show how these artistic disciplines have grown through their interplay with engineering and science.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP326H1 - Special Topics in Creative Writing

    TEP326H1 - Special Topics in Creative Writing
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    In this course, students will explore the creative writing process, with an emphasis on the giving and receiving of critical feedback. This exploration will reinforce the iterative principles of the engineering design process and will provide students with flexible and transferable tools for them to apply to future engineering work. They will examine up to two genres of creative writing (fiction, science fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, screenwriting, playwriting, etc.) in order to hone their own creative and critical thinking skills. Students will be introduced to relevant elements of craft, will analyze representative literary examples, will create original creative work both in generative weekly exercises and in longer at-home assignments, will give and receive feedback from their peers through structured in-class workshops, and will apply this feedback to their own writing.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP343H1 - Engineering Leadership

    TEP343H1 - Engineering Leadership
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 12.8L/25.6P

    Complementary Studies elective

    This course is a practical approach to being a more productive engineer, based on the premise that for technology to become a reality, it must be translated through people. A key is understanding engineers lead in ways that reflect their skills and mind set. The course begins with examining: 1) the meaning of leading (Why do something?); 2) the processes of leading (How do you do you create a vision and motivate others?); and 3) the tools of leading (What steps do you take to lead?). Learning frameworks and personal working styles inventories, provide practical tools to assist the student to understand human nature and the logic of learning, to become a competent leader of self, teams and organizations. The student prepares to become a competent leader by undertaking to learn (understand and integrate) key skills, character attributes and purposeful behaviours. The course presents strategies for development of high-performance teams. Special attention is given to a number of subjects: transformational change, organizational culture, high performance work systems, and self-leadership. The course material is delivered through lectures, readings, in-class discussion and a team project. The project is based on the team interviewing the CEO of an engineering-intensive company or senior leader in the community. Students will be required to submit written reflections on course content and their personal experience.

    Total AUs: 23.6 (Fall), 25.6 (Winter), 49.2 (Full Year)

    TEP432H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business Management

    TEP432H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business Management
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 51.2L/12.8T

    Complementary Studies elective

    Part 2 of the 2 Part Entrepreneurship Program

    This is part two of the Entrepreneurship course series. The student  taking this course would typically plan to pursue a career in small business started by themselves, or in a family enterprise. The skills acquired, however, are very useful in any business where a graduate might end up in their career, without the need to  be an entrepreneur. Our approach to teaching is based on real-life business experiences and many years of successful practice of "what we preach". The course contains very little theoretical work or academic approaches. It is designed to familiarize you with the kinds of opportunities (problems) likely to be encountered in an entrepreneurial career. If you really want this lifestyle and are prepared to work hard, we will provide you with the practical knowledge and technical skills required to pursue this kind of career. Topics covered in this course include: Marketing and Sales; Legal issues; Financing the business; Human Resources challenges, the Business Plan and many other issues. Note, the course material may be adjusted between the two courses as required. We recognize the value of communication skills in the classroom and in project reports. We require that you learn how to present yourself in a business-like manner. As and when appropriate, outside visitors from the business community will join in and contribute to the class discussions. The course deals with practical concepts, actual past and current events, and is presented from the point of view of someone who has "done it all". This means  what you hear is the “real stuff”. There will be several assignments and the preparation of a full Business Plan as the session project. Please note,  the 5 hours per week will  be used for whatever is needed at the time, so tutorials will not normally happen as the calendar indicates them.

    Prerequisite: APS234H1 / TEP234H1
    Exclusion: CHE488H1/CIV488H1/ECE488H1/MIE488H1/MSE488H1
    Total AUs: 53.1 (Fall), 57.6 (Winter), 110.7 (Full Year)

    TEP442H1 - Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership

    TEP442H1 - Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L

    Complementary Studies elective

    This course investigates the cognitive and psychological foundations of effective leadership. Students will explore current theories driving effective leadership practice, including: models of leadership, neurophysiological correlates of leadership, and psychodynamic approaches to leadership. Students will learn and apply skills, including: mental modeling, decision-making, teamwork and self-evaluation techniques. This course is aimed at helping Engineering students to gain practical skills, which will enhance their impact as leaders throughout their careers.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP444H1 - Positive Psychology for Engineers

    TEP444H1 - Positive Psychology for Engineers
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L

    Humanities and Social Science elective

    Many disciplines have explored happiness - philosophy, anthropology, psychology, sociology, neurobiology, film, art and literature - to name a few. Why not engineering? During the first part of the course, we will play catch-up, examining the scholarly and creative ways that people have attempted to understand what makes for a happy life. Then we turn our attention to our own domain-expertise, applying engineering concepts like: "balance", "flow", "amplitude", "dynamic equilibrium", "momentum" and others, to explore the ways  your technical knowledge can contribute to a deep understanding of happiness. This course is designed to challenge you academically as we analyze texts from a variety of disciplines. It is also designed to challenge you personally, to explore happiness as it relates to yourself, your own personal development and your success and fulfillment as an engineer.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP445H1 - The Power of Story: Discovering Your Leadership Narrative

    TEP445H1 - The Power of Story: Discovering Your Leadership Narrative
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/12.8T

    Humanities and Social Science elective

    This course offers an introduction to relational, authentic and transformational leadership theory, by focusing on narrative and the power of storytelling. Students will practice storytelling techniques by: learning about the mechanics of stories; improve their public speaking by engaging in regular storytelling practice; explore their personal history by reflecting on their identities; and develop critical thinking skills regarding the stories (meta-narratives) that surround us; particularly as they relate to engineering problems/ethics. This is a highly experiential course with a focus on reading, discussion, practice and reflection.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP447H1 - The Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in Engineering

    TEP447H1 - The Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in Engineering
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 38.4L

    The primary objective of this course is to help engineering students navigate the ambiguous world of engineering ethics and equity using case studies drawn from the careers of Canadian engineers. This course tackles complex ethics and equity challenges by focusing on multiple levels of practice: from design work to organizational practice and governance. By applying a systems lens, students will learn to develop the knowledge and skills needed for short-term and long-term action strategies. In addition to being exposed to a range of ethical theories, the PEO code of ethics, and the legal context of engineering ethics, students enrolled in this course will engage in ethical decision-making on a weekly basis.

    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

    TEP448H1 - System Mapping

    TEP448H1 - System Mapping
    Credit Value: 0.50
    Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

    Engineers are taught to think in systems, but often these are limited in scope to the technical realm. Yet, many of today’s “wicked problems” are as much dictated by social and environmental considerations as by any technical considerations. System mapping is a system thinking tool  frequently used in fields such as public health and environmental policy to describe complex, multi-stakeholder problems. Students will apply system mapping techniques to describe complex problems with technical, social and environmental aspects. Students will explore fields outside of engineering  critical to these challenges, including: public policy, sociology, and law. Students will complete a team project to develop a system map of a complex problem. The emphasis will be on problem definition, not problem solution, though it is expected  maps will point to potential paths for solution.

    Enrolment Limits: 36
    Total AUs: 35.4 (Fall), 38.4 (Winter), 73.8 (Full Year)

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