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APS100H1: Orientation to Engineering

Fixed Credit Value: 0.25
Hours: 12.8L/12.8T

This course is designed to help students transition into first-year engineering studies and to develop and apply a greater understanding of the academic learning environment, the field of engineering, and how the fundamental mathematics and sciences are used in an engineering context. Topics covered include: study skills, time management, problem solving, successful teamwork, effective communications, exam preparation, stress management and wellness, undergraduate research, extra- and co-curricular involvement, engineering disciplines and career opportunities, and applications of math and science in engineering.

APS106H1: Fundamentals of Computer Programming

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

An introduction to computer systems and software. Topics include the representation of information, algorithms, programming languages, operating systems and software engineering. Emphasis is on the design of algorithms and their implementation in software. Students will develop a competency in the Python programming language. Laboratory exercises will explore the concepts of both Structure-based and Object-Oriented programming using examples drawn from mathematics and engineering applications.

APS110H1: Engineering Chemistry and Materials Science

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course is structured around the principle of the structure-property relationship. This relationship refers to an understanding of the microstructure of a solid, that is, the nature of the bonds between atoms and the spatial arrangement of atoms, which permits the explanation of observed behaviour. Observed materials behaviour includes mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical, and corrosive behaviour. Topics covered in this course include: structure of the atom, models of the atom, electronic configuration, the electromagnetic spectrum, band theory, atomic bonding, optical transparency of solids, magnetic properties, molecular bonding, hybridized orbitals, crystal systems, lattices and structures, crystallographic notation, imperfections in solids, reaction rates, activation energy, solid-state diffusion, materials thermodynamics, free energy, and phase equilibrium.

APS111H1: Engineering Strategies & Practice I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for understanding problem solving and developing communications skills. This first course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to the process of engineering design, to strategies for successful team work, and to design for human factors, society and the environment. Students write team and individual technical reports and give presentations within a discussion group.

APS112H1: Engineering Strategies & Practice II

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6P

This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process, problem solving and project management. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for practicing team skills and developing communications skills. Building on the first course, this second course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to project management and to the design process in greater depth. Students work in teams on a term length design project. Students will write a series of technical reports and give a team based design project presentation.

APS301H1: Technology in Society and the Biosphere I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Humanities and Social Science Elective
This course teaches future engineers to look beyond their specialized domains of expertise in order to understand how technology functions within human life, society and the biosphere. By providing this context for design and decision-making, students will be enabled to do more than achieve the desired results by also preventing or significantly reducing undesired consequences. A more preventively-oriented mode of practicing engineering will be developed in four areas of application: materials and production, energy, work and cities. The emphasis within these topics will reflect the interests of the class.

CHE112H1: Physical Chemistry

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

A course in physical chemistry. Topics discussed include systems and their states, stoichiometry, the properties of gases, the laws of chemical thermodynamics (calculations involving internal energy, enthalpy, free energy, and entropy), phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, acids and bases, solutions, colligative properties, electrochemistry, and corrosion.

CHE353H1: Engineering Biology

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 25.6L/25.6T

Using a quantitative, problem solving approach, this course will introduce basic concepts in cell biology and physiology. Various engineering modelling tools will be used to investigate aspects of cell growth and metabolism, transport across cell membranes, protein structure, homeostasis, nerve conduction and mechanical forces in biology.

Exclusion: BME105H1

CHE354H1: Cellular and Molecular Biology

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/12.8P

This course will cover the principles of molecular and cellular biology as they apply to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics will include: metabolic conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; nucleic acids; enzymology; structure and function relationships within cells; and motility and growth. Genetic analysis, immunohistochemistry, hybridomis, cloning, recombinant DNA and biotechnology will also be covered. This course will appeal to students interested in environmental microbiology, biomaterials and tissue engineering, and bioprocesses.

Prerequisite: CHE353H1

CIV100H1: Mechanics

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The principles of statics are applied to composition and resolution of forces, moments and couples. The equilibrium states of structures are examined. Throughout, the free body diagram concept is emphasized. Vector algebra is used where it is most useful, and stress blocks are introduced. Shear force diagrams, bending moment diagrams and stress-strain relationships for materials are discussed. Stress and deformation in axially loaded members and flexural members (beams) are also covered.

Exclusion: APS160H1

CIV185H1: Earth Systems Science

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/25.6P

This course introduces students to the basic earth sciences with an emphasis on understanding the impact of humans on the natural earth systems. Beginning with a study of the lithosphere, principles of physical geology will be examined including the evolution and internal structure of the earth, dynamic processes that affect the earth, formation of minerals and rocks and soil, ore bodies and fossil- energy sources. Next, the biosphere will be studied, including the basic concepts of ecology including systems ecology and biogeochemical cycles. The influence of humans and the built environment on these natural systems will also be examined with a view to identifying more sustainable engineering practices. Finally, students will study the oceans and the atmosphere and the physical, chemical and thermodynamic processes involved in climate change.

CIV191H1: Introduction to Civil Engineering

Fixed Credit Value: 0.15
Hours: 12.8L

This is a seminar series that will preview the core fields in Engineering. Each seminar will highlight one of the major areas of Engineering. The format will vary and may include application examples, challenges, case studies, career opportunities, etc. The purpose of the seminar series is to provide first year students with some understanding of the various options within the Faculty to enable them to make educated choices for second year. This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis.

CIV201H1: Introduction to Civil Engineering

Fixed Credit Value: 0.20

A field-based course introducing students to current and historical civil engineering works in the urban and natural environments, highlighting the role of the Civil Engineer in developing sustainable solutions. It will run the Tuesday through Thursday immediately following Labour Day, with follow-up assignments coordinated with the course CIV282 Engineering Communications I. Students must have their own personal protective equipment (PPE). One night will be spent at the University of Toronto Survey Camp near Minden, Ontario.

CIV209H1: Civil Engineering Materials

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/25.6P

Deals with the basic principles necessary for the use and selection of materials used in Civil Engineering and points out the significance of these in practice. Fundamentals which provide a common basis for the properties of various materials are stressed. The laboratory time is devoted to demonstrations illustrating the fundamentals covered in lectures.

Prerequisite: APS104H1 or MSE101H1

CIV214H1: Structural Analysis I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course provides an introduction to the nature of loads and restraints and types of structural elements, and then reviews the analysis of statically determinate structures. Shear and moment diagrams for beams and frames are considered, along with influence lines, cantilever structures, three-pin arches, cables and fatigue. Virtual work principles are viewed and applied to various structural systems. An introduction to the analysis of indeterminate structures is made, and the Portal method is applied to the analysis of building frames under lateral loads. Displacement methods of an analysis including moment distribution are also studied.

Prerequisite: MAT188H1, CME210H1

CIV220H1: Urban Engineering Ecology

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor Basic concepts of ecology within the context of urban environments. Response of organisms, populations, dynamic predator-prey and competition processes, and ecosystems to human activities. Thermodynamic basis for food chains, energy flow, biodiversity and ecosystem stability. Biogeochemical cycles, habitat fragmentation and bioaccumulation. Introduction to industrial ecology and life cycle assessment principles. Urban metabolism and material flow analysis of cities. Response of receiving waters to pollution and introduction to waste water treatment. Emphasis is on identifying the environment/engineering interface and minimizing environmental impacts.

Prerequisite: CHE112H1.

CIV235H1: Civil Engineering Graphics

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 76.8P

Fluency in graphical communication skills as part of the civil engineering design process is emphasized. Drawings are prepared making use of freehand sketching, drafting equipment and commercially available computer drafting programs. Topics in descriptive geometry are covered to develop spatial visualization skills. Drawing procedures and standards relevant to Civil Engineering projects to be covered include layout and development of multiple orthographic views, sectional views, dimensioning, and pictorial views. Class projects, assignments, and examples demonstrate how graphical skills fit into the overall design process.

CIV250H1: Hydraulics and Hydrology

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

The hydrologic processes of precipitation and snowmelt, evapotranspiration, ground water movement, and surface and subsurface runoff are examined. Water resources sustainability issues are discussed, including water usage and water shortages, climate change impacts, land use impacts, and source water protection. Conceptual models of the hydrologic cycle and basics of hydrologic modelling are developed, including precipitation estimation, infiltration and abstraction models, runoff hydrographs, the unit hydrograph method and the Rational method. Methods for statistical analysis of hydrologic data, concepts of risk and design, and hydrological consequences of climate change for design are introduced. Principles of open channel hydraulics are introduced. Energy and momentum principles are studied with application to channel transitions, critical flow, choked flow, and hydraulic jumps.

Prerequisite: CME270H1

CIV280H1: Management of Construction

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

An introduction to the management of construction projects including: the nature of the industry, project delivery alternatives, legal and ethical considerations, the Safety Act and construction regulations, labour relations, construction contracts, risk distribution, project planning and scheduling, estimating and bidding, controlling of time, cost and quality, accounting leading to financial statements, dispute resolution, as well as new and evolving concepts in managing construction.

CIV282H1: Engineering Communications I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.20
Hours: 12.8L/12.8T

This course develops students' communications skills focusing on the specific skills required for work in foundational civil engineering. Target communication areas include: Oral Presentation; Logical Argument; Document Development; Sentence and Discourse Control; and Visual Design. The course will build capacity in support of specific assignments delivered in other courses in the same term.

CIV300H1: Terrestrial Energy Systems

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Core Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.

Exclusion: ENV346H1

CIV312H1: Steel and Timber Design

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

An introduction to structural engineering design. Topics discussed include safety and reliability, load and resistance, probability of failure, performance factors, and material properties. A study of basic steel design examines tension members, compression members, beams, framing concepts and connections. Plasticity and composite action in steel structural systems are also discussed. Timber design aspects include beams, compression members and connections.

Prerequisite: CIV214H1, CIV235H1

CIV313H1: Reinforced Concrete I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course provides an introduction to the design of reinforced concrete structures. Concrete technology, properties of concrete and reinforcing steel, construction practice, and general code requirements are discussed. Analysis and design of members under axial load, flexure, shear, and restraint force are examined in detail. Other aspects of design covered include control of cracks, minimum and maximum reinforcement ratios, fire resistance, durability, distress and failure. A major design project, done in teams of two and accounting for 15% of the final mark, requires students to formulate a complete design for a structural system such as a pedestrian bridge or floor system. Project requirements include consideration of alternative designs in terms of structural efficiency and total costs.

Prerequisite: CIV312H1

CIV324H1: Geotechnical Engineering II

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Building on CME321, more complex aspects of geotechnical analysis and design are considered. Topics include: mineralogy; soil identification and classification; laboratory- and field-based soil index tests; correlations of index test results to engineering properties; vertical stress distribution; soil-foundation interaction; volume change and consolidation of clay and settlement. Shear strength of soil and slope stability analysis are also discussed. Laboratories are held for soil identification and classification, and confined triaxial compression tests of clay and sand.

Prerequisite: CME321H1.

CIV331H1: Transport I - Introduction to Urban Transportation Systems

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course introduces the fundamentals of transportation systems and the application of engineering, mathematical and economic concepts and principles to address a variety of transportation issues in Canada. Several major aspects of transportation engineering will be addressed, including transportation planning, public transit, traffic engineering, geometric design, pavement design and the economic, social and environmental impacts of transportation. The course focuses on urban transportation engineering problems.

CIV332H1: Transport II - Performance

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course focuses on the fundamental techniques of transportation systems performance analysis with emphasis on congested traffic networks. Topics include transportation demand, supply and equilibrium, traffic assignment, network equilibrium, and system optimality, traffic flow theory, shockwaves, highway capacity analysis, introduction to deterministic and stochastic queuing analyses, intersection signal control types and related timing methods, and traffic simulation. The course also provides an introduction to basic elements of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS).

CIV340H1: Municipal Engineering

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Municipal service systems for water supply and wastewater disposal, land development, population forecasting, and demand analysis. Water supply: source development, transmission, storage, pumping, and distribution networks. Sewerage and drainage, sewer and culvert hydraulics, collection networks, and storm water management. Maintenance and rehabilitation of water and wastewater systems, and optimization of network design. Design projects.

Prerequisite: CIV250H1.

CIV342H1: Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

Principles involved in the design and operation of water and wastewater treatment facilities are covered, including physical, chemical and biological unit operations, advanced treatment and sludge processing.

CIV375H1: Building Science

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T/4.224000168P

The fundamentals of the science of heat transfer, moisture diffusion, and air movement are presented. Using these fundamentals, the principles of more sustainable building enclosure design, including the design of walls and roofs are examined. Selected case studies together with laboratory investigations are used to illustrate how the required indoor temperature and moisture conditions can be maintained using more durable and more sustainable designs.

Exclusion: CIV575H1

CIV380H1: Sustainable Energy Systems

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course will provide students with knowledge of energy demand and supply from local to national scales. Topics include energy demands throughout the economy, major energy technologies, how these technologies work, how they are evaluated quantitatively, their economics and their impacts on the environment. In addition, the ever changing context in which these technologies (and emerging technologies) are being implemented will be outlined. Systems approaches including life cycle assessment, will be refined and applied to evaluate energy systems. A particular focus will be placed on analysis of energy alternatives within a carbon constrained economy.

Prerequisite: CIV375H1, CIV220H1, CME368H1.