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CIV382Y1: Civil Engineering Communication Portfolio

Fixed Credit Value: 0.00
Hours: 3.2T

Students will assemble a portfolio of communication assignments drawn from their second and third year Civil Engineering courses as a showcase of their ability to meet the graduate attributes for communication. The student will demonstrate competence in discipline specific written, oral, and visual communication through the selection of assignments for the portfolio. Each entry will be framed by a short introduction speaking to the context of the work and its significance in the portfolio. Students whose communication work is not up to standard will be provided with opportunities for revision. The course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis; students who receive no credit must retake the course in year 4.

CIV416H1: Reinforced Concrete II

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course covers the behaviour and ultimate strength of reinforced concrete structures. Members subjected to flexure, axial load, shear and torsion are treated. Detailing of reinforcement, the design of floor systems and the design of shear walls are covered. An introduction to the seismic design of reinforced concrete structures is made. Emphasis is given to the relationship between recent research results and current building codes. A brief treatment of the behaviour and design of masonry walls is included.

Prerequisite: CIV313H1

CIV420H1: Construction Engineering

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course considers the engineering aspects of construction including earthmoving, equipment productivity, fleet balancing, formwork design, shoring, hoisting, aggregate production, equipment operating costs, and modular construction. Several construction projects will be reviewed to demonstrate methods and processes. Students will be expected to visit construction sites, so safety boots and hard hats are required.

CIV440H1: Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor. The process and techniques for assessing and managing the impacts on and risks to humans and the ecosystem associated with engineered facilities, processes and products. Both biophysical and social impacts are addressed. Topics include: environmental assessment processes; environmental legislation; techniques for assessing impacts; engineering risk analysis; health risk assessment; risk management and communication; social impact assessment; cumulative impacts; environmental management systems; the process of considering alternative methods for preventing and controlling impacts; and stakeholder involvement and public participation. Examples are drawn from various engineering activities and facilities such as energy production, chemical production, treatment plants, highways and landfills.

CIV477H1: Special Studies in Civil Engineering

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

A course covering selected topics in Civil Engineering not covered in other electives. The topics, which may be different every year, are selected by Staff. Course may not be offered every year and there may be limited enrolment in particular years.

CIV498H1: Group Design Project

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4T

The Group Design Project is a significant design experience that integrates the mathematics, basic sciences, engineering sciences, complementary studies, and detailed design aspects of the different civil engineering sub-disciplines.

Exclusion: APS490Y1

CIV510H1: Solid Mechanics II

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course provides a continuing study of the mechanics of deformable solids. Stress and equilibrium conditions, strain and compatibility conditions, stress-strain relations and yield/failure criteria are considered in the context of civil engineering materials. Two-and three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed, with an introduction to the use of tensor notation. Advanced topics in bending, shear and torsion of beams are also covered, as is elementary plate bending theory. The course concludes with a further development and application of energy methods including virtual work, potential energy, strain energy, and related approaches.

Prerequisite: CME210H1

CIV514H1: Concrete Technology

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Material aspects of concrete production will be dealt with in the context of various performance criteria with emphasis on durability. The process of material selection, proportioning, mixing, transporting, placing and curing concrete will be the framework within which topics such as: the use of admixtures, choice of cements, environmental influences, methods of consolidation and testing techniques will be studied.

Prerequisite: CIV209H1

CIV515H1: Introduction to Structural Dynamics

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

The concept of dynamic equilibrium and corresponding equation of motion will be introduced. The theoretical solution of a songle degree of freedom system will be derived and the effects of verious types of loads, such as impulse load, sinusoidal load, or random vibration on the structural response will be discussed. To solve dynamic problems of multi-degree of freedom (MDOF) systems, concepts of mass, stiffness, and damping matrix will be introduced, which will be followed by eigen value analysis and modal analysis. The concepts of Fourier Transformation will be introduced, which will be used to interpret dynamic responses of structures or dynamic nature of applied loads. Dynamic experiments of elastic systems will be demonstrated using an educational shaking table.

Prerequisite: CIV312H1 and CIV313H1 or equivalent

CIV516H1: Public Transit Operations and Planning

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course covers a broad range of topics in urban transit operations and planning, with special emphasis on best-practice strategies of modern transit systems. The course will help students: Learn the history of transit and its relationship to urban development, emerging challenges, transit role in society, and new trends and issues; Understand and analyze the factors that affect transit performance and demand; Identify and analyze transit operational and planning problems; Identify possible solutions at the operational level (mostly short-term and line-based) and the strategic level (mostly long-term and network-based), and assess alternative solutions; Understand the relative performance of various transit modes (both conventional and new modes) and their domains of application; and gain knowledge of best-practice transit systems planning and emerging innovations.

CIV517H1: Prestressed Concrete

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

An introduction to procedures for predicting the load-deformation response of prestressed concrete elements and structures with emphasis on how these procedures can be used in the design of new structures and in the evaluation of existing structures. Topics include: prestressing technology; control of cracking; response to axial load and flexure; response to shear and torsion; disturbed regions; restraint of deformations; design codes.

Prerequisite: CIV313H1 or CIV357H1 or equivalent.

CIV518H1: Behaviour and Design of Steel Structures

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The behaviour and design of trusses, frames, members and connections in steel building and bridge structures is presented and design methods are developed. Ultimate strength, stability, and postbuckling are emphasized in topical examples including: plate girders, composite steel/concrete girders, second-order frame behaviour, high-strength bolted and welded framing connections. Design applications considering metal fatigue and brittle fracture, and methods of plastic analysis are also introduced. Canadian design standards and the Limit States Design concepts are used.

CIV519H1: Structural Analysis II

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

The general flexibility and stiffness methods of analysis; multispan beams, trusses, frames and grids; loadings due to force, support displacement, temperature change and member prestrain; axial and flexural stability; basic plasticity. Topics in this course represent the basis for the finite element method of analysis.

Prerequisite: CIV214H1

CIV521H1: Rock Mechanics

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course provides general analytical tools and experimental methods that are used in rock mechanics. The lectures are complemented with laboratory experiments. Theoretical topics include: stress and strain, linear elasticity, failure modes and models of rocks, fracture of rocks, inelastic behavior of rock, seismic waves in rocks.
Experiments include: preparation of rock samples, uniaxial compressive strength measurements, Brazilian disc tests for rock tensile strength, fracture toughness measurements with core-based rock samples.

Prerequisite: CME210H1

CIV523H1: Geotechnical Design

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course is built around a transportation project that contains all the essential geotechnical investigation and design elements and illustrates how they all come together on a project. The students will be taken through the entire design process from project initiation to construction. In essence, the project will include a bridge over a river with some property constraints requiring the use of a retaining wall as well as deep and shallow foundations and some groundwater control. The highway will require a soil cut. One section crosses a low-lying swampy area that will require embankment construction over deep soft soils. A short tunnel section is planned beneath a railway that cannot be taken out of service. A pavement design will be required along the entire route as well as materials testing and construction monitoring.

Prerequisite: CME321H1; equivalent or permission of instructor

CIV531H1: Transport Planning

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

This course is intended to provide the student with the following: the ability to design and execute an urban transportation planning study; a working knowledge of transportation planning analysis skills including introductions to travel demand modelling, analysis of environmental impacts, modelling transportation - land use interactions and transportation project evaluation; an understanding of current transportation planning issues and policies; and an understanding of the overall process of transportation planning and its role within the wider context of transportation decision-making and the planning and design of urban areas. Person-based travel in urban regions is the focus of this course, but a brief introduction to freight and intercity passenger transportation is also provided. A "systems" approach to transportation planning and analysis is introduced and maintained throughout the course. Emphasis is placed throughout on designing transportation systems for long-run environmental, social, and economic sustainability.

Prerequisite: CME368H1 or equivalent.

CIV536H1: Urban Activity, Air Pollution, and Health

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This is an interdisciplinary course where the challenge of air pollution is introduced with a focus on urban areas. The interdependencies between transportation, air quality, and health are demonstrated. The city and the behaviour of its inhabitants constitute the context for the following course topics: overview of air pollutants in urban areas, urban air quality monitoring networks, mobile source emissions, air pollution and meteorology, atmospheric dispersion, chemical processes specific to cities, personal mobility and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, epidemiology of air pollution.

CIV541H1: Environmental Biotechnology

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

Principles involved in the design and operation of biologically-based treatment facilities are covered with considerations for energy efficiency and sustainability. The course includes water / wastewater biological unit operations, advanced treatment, sludge processing and composting, natural treatment systems and specialized bioengineered systems such as groundwater remediation and biological air treatment.

Prerequisite: CIV342H1 or equivalent.

CIV549H1: Groundwater Flow and Contamination

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Mechanics of saturated and unsaturated fluid flow in porous media. Confined and unconfined flow. Flow to wells. Analytical and numerical solutions of groundwater flow equations. Non-reactive and reactive contaminant transport on groundwater systems. Analytical and numerical solutions of contaminant transport equations. Flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. Assessment of environmental impacts of waste disposal operations. Remediation of contaminated groundwater.

Prerequisite: CME270H1, CIV250H1 or equivalent

CIV550H1: Water Resources Engineering

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Global and national water problems, law and legislation. Hydraulic structures. Reservoir analysis. Urban drainage and runoff control: meteorologic data analysis, deterministic and stochastic modelling techniques. Flood control: structural and nonstructural alternatives. Power generation: hydro and thermal power generation. Low flow augmentation. Economics and decision making.

Prerequisite: CIV250H1, CIV340H1 or equivalent

CIV576H1: Sustainable Buildings

CIV577H1: Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T

Developing infrastructure for sustainable cities entails understanding the connection between urban morphology and physiology. This course uses a systems approach to analyzing anthropogenic material flow and other components of urban metabolism, linking them to the design of urban infrastructure. Elements of sustainable transportation, green buildings, urban climatology, urban vegetation, water systems and local energy supply are integrated in the design of sustainable urban neighbourhoods.

Prerequisite: CIV340H1, [CIV375H1/CIV575H1]

CIV578H1: Design of Building Enclosures

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

A brief summary of the science involved in controlling heat, moisture and air movement in buildings is presented at the outset of the course. With this background, methods of designing enclosures for cold, mixed, and hot climates are examined. Design principles related to the design of walls, windows and roofs are presented and applied. In particular, topics related to the control of rain penetration, air movement, and interstitial condensation are studied in detail. Emphasis is placed on developing designs based on fundamentals which can be verified with computer modelling solutions.

Prerequisite: CIV375/CIV575 or equivalent

CIV580H1: Engineering and Management of Large Projects

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L

This technical elective course will investigate the role of stakeholders in major civil engineering projects; the complexities of managing project stages, multiple stakeholders, and technical challenges, and, social and environmental factors.

Each week includes a different speaker who can address issues related to technical, social, and environmental challenges in the project and how they were overcome.

CME210H1: Solid Mechanics I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/19.2T/19.2P

An introduction to the mechanics of deformable bodies. General biaxial and triaxial stress conditions in continua are studied, as are elastic stress, strain and deformation relations for members subjected to axial load, bending and shear. Properties of plane sections, moment-area theorems for calculating deflection, and Mohr's circle representation of stress and of moment of inertia are examined, followed by a look at stability.

Prerequisite: CIV100H1, MAT186H1, MAT187H1
Exclusion: CIV210H1

CME261H1: Engineering Mathematics I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

This course deals with both numerical methods for engineering analysis (solution of linear and non-linear equations, interpolation, numerical integration) and advanced topics in analytical calculus (multiple integrals and vector analysis). Within the numerical methods portion of the course emphasis is placed on problem formulation, solution algorithm design and programming applications. Within the analytical calculus portion emphasis is placed on the mathematical foundations of engineering practice and the interrelationship between analytical and numerical solution methods.

Prerequisite: MAT188H1, MAT187H1

CME262H1: Engineering Mathematics II

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

This course continues the study of numerical and analytical methods for civil engineering analysis. Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations are treated in some detail, followed by numerical solution methods for partial differential equations. The final major topic of the course deals with an introduction to optimization. Emphasis is placed throughout the course on problem formulation, solution algorithm design and programming applications.

Prerequisite: CME261H1
Exclusion: CME362H1

CME263H1: Probability Theory for Civil and Mineral Engineers

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/25.6T

Probability theory as the study of random phenomena in Civil and Mineral Engineering systems, including the definition of probability, conditional probability, Bayes' theorem in discrete and continuous sample spaces. Common single and multivariate distributions. Mathematical expectation including mean and variance. Independence. An introduction to realizations of probability models and parameter estimation.

CME270H1: Fluid Mechanics I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/19.2P

Fluid and flow characteristics, applications, dimensions and units. Fluid statics. One-dimensional flow including conservation of mass, energy and momentum. Introduction to dimensional analysis and similitude, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layer concept, and flow about immersed objects. Calculation of flow in closed conduits and open channels.

CME321H1: Geotechnical Engineering I

Fixed Credit Value: 0.50
Hours: 38.4L/12.8T/12.8P

An introduction to elements of geotechnical analysis and design. Basic site investigation techniques and quantitative descriptions of soil properties and behaviour. Permeability, seepage analysis, and internal stability of granular soil; granular filter design for internal hydraulic stability. Compaction of granular soil; engineered fills for earth dams, road bases, and backfills. Soil shear strength at constant volume; ultimate limit state design of retaining walls, shallow footings, natural slopes and constructed embankments. Groundwater flow analysis and slope stability analysis using commercial software. Physical laboratories for basic soil identification, model groundwater flow analysis, direct shear strength tests, and reinforced earth models.

Prerequisite: CME270H1, CME210H1